alex-roma
Member

To End Contract or Not to End Contract

Hi, Upwork community! I'm Alex, I'm still a little new here.

 

So, I'm having a dilemma and I'm not sure whether to do anything about it or not. I accepted an offer a couple days ago, and...it's hard to put my finger on what's not working for me. The client is fine. We're not really on the same wavelength but he communicates and he's usually available and he's liked my work so far. The pay is about as good as I've been able to find in the entry level section of Upwork ($8/hr). The work is easy. But I still feel like something is off.

 

Now that I have a better sense of the job, the writing isn't really what I was looking for, and I'm having a hard time getting a good picture of what's needed. I don't know, it just feels like a very awkward fit. This wouldn't really bother me if there was an end goal in sight, but because this is a long-term job, I've been wondering if I should just email and say, "Hey, this isn't really the kind of work I'm looking for. I'll finish up all of your assignments so far, but then I think we should probably just end the contract." 

 

I have other jobs and I've had a pretty easy time finding other work that does feel like a good fit for me. I also have a full-time day job, so I'm not worried about that, but I'm a little worried about feedback. All of my jobs so far are ongoing (two of them are long-term, one just started and will likely be long-term, one finishes next week), so I haven't had any feedback yet. I'm worried if I end this contract, potential bad feedback could severely damage my ability to find work in the future, because it will be the only feedback I have. On the other hand, I worry that if I wait for a few weeks, it will be harder to finish everything up and end the contract. 

 

Anyone been in this kind of position before? Any advice? 

 

...Alex

ACCEPTED SOLUTION
tlsanders
Member

Probably if you don't feel like you're on the same page with the client and this work isn't a good fit for you, your rating is already at risk. Ending the job is probably the best idea. However, I'd do it a little differently than you've described here.

 

First, I wouldn't tell the client it wasn't the type of work I was looking for--I would say that as I'd started work and learned more about the project, I'd begun to feel that I wasn't the best fit for his needs. Then, I'd assure him that I didn't want to leave him hanging, so would finish (this batch, the week, whatever is appropriate in your circumstances) to give him the opportunity to replace me. 

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tlsanders
Member

Probably if you don't feel like you're on the same page with the client and this work isn't a good fit for you, your rating is already at risk. Ending the job is probably the best idea. However, I'd do it a little differently than you've described here.

 

First, I wouldn't tell the client it wasn't the type of work I was looking for--I would say that as I'd started work and learned more about the project, I'd begun to feel that I wasn't the best fit for his needs. Then, I'd assure him that I didn't want to leave him hanging, so would finish (this batch, the week, whatever is appropriate in your circumstances) to give him the opportunity to replace me. 

Were there no red flags when you interviewed the client beforehand?

 

I understand, there aren't always red flashing lights screaming "DO NOT WORK WITH THIS CLIENT."

 

Also, always keep in mind that the minute you open a contract with a client, they can have an impact on your JSS, even if you decide to refund them the money (I'm not saying that's what you're going to do, but it's food for thought). 

 

Another future suggestion is, CHOOSE A WRITING NICHE. Otherwise, you're going to find more and more the "hey this doesn't fit the type of writing I want to do" and it can be a downward spiral regarding your JSS from there. 

 

What specifically about the writing is not aligned with you as a writer? The topic? While "feels" can indicate not a good fit with a client, it's also wise to turn those "feels" into rational explanations so you don't enter a similar contract and again "feel" that it's not a good fit down the line. 

 

Have you discussed this with your client? I wouldn't hit them up with "I don't FEEL this is working" (unless they are being abusive in some way -- or there is specific scope creep involved, but it goes back to specificity). Which is why putting your writing ability to good use and assessing what specifically is "awkward" about the situation would be a good move before contacting the client.