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Uncooperative client

Community Leader
Peter G Member Since: Aug 1, 2015
11 of 14

@Jean S - If the client wants a generic cover letter - a template - no guidance or instructions may be needed, assuming the writer is an expert.  Still, if the OP requested specific instructions, the client should make an effort to supply some.  For example, which information in the resume does he want to stress - which skills, job responsibilities, past employers, etc.?  Is the client planning on a lateral move to a different company, or is he targeting a new position ... or even a new industry?

 

(In a past life, I worked for an executive outplacement firm, where I wrote hundreds of resumes and cover letters. There, it was standard for clients to provide instructions re cover letters.)

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
12 of 14

@Peter G wrote:

@Jean S - If the client wants a generic cover letter - a template - no guidance or instructions may be needed, assuming the writer is an expert.  Still, if the OP requested specific instructions, the client should make an effort to supply some.  For example, which information in the resume does he want to stress - which skills, job responsibilities, past employers, etc.?  Is the client planning on a lateral move to a different company, or is he targeting a new position ... or even a new industry?

 

(In a past life, I worked for an executive outplacement firm, where I wrote hundreds of resumes and cover letters. There, it was standard for clients to provide instructions re cover letters.)


That surprises me. In my experience, the reason most clients come looking for help with something as simple as a cover letter is that they have absolutely no idea what to emphasize or how to organize it--in short, don't know anything beyond "I need a good cover letter."

 

I see it as the writer's role to ask not for generic guidance, but the specific questions that will form the letter, such as information about the position applied for.

Community Leader
Peter G Member Since: Aug 1, 2015
13 of 14

"I see it as the writer's role to ask not for generic guidance, but the specific questions that will form the letter ,,,"

 

I agree.  I think we've been on the same page the whole time.

 

I wasn't suggesting that the writer ask her client, "Gee, what do you want me to do?" but that she ask specific questions re the target audience and content - such as the ones I mentioned above.

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
14 of 14

However, the OP's client could be a farmer and doesn't have a clue what his/her client wants. Hence the lack of communication.

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