cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Unfair Feedback

fariha_r
Ace Contributor

How do you change an unfair feedback if the client blocks you? He falsely claimed I passed the deadline and gave me a 1-star review after giving a threatening message initially on the day of the due date. I have requested help from an UpWork agent. Will it be effective?

ACCEPTED SOLUTION
tlsanders
Community Guru

Not unless you are top rated. If you are top rated, you can remove one piece of feedback from your profile/JSS calculation every 3 months/10 jobs. Otherwise, there is generally no way to clear feedback. You have the opportunity to respond to feedback on your profile, but be very careful. Often, freelancers who use this opportunity end up doing themselves much more harm than good.

View solution in original post

21 REPLIES 21
tlsanders
Community Guru

Not unless you are top rated. If you are top rated, you can remove one piece of feedback from your profile/JSS calculation every 3 months/10 jobs. Otherwise, there is generally no way to clear feedback. You have the opportunity to respond to feedback on your profile, but be very careful. Often, freelancers who use this opportunity end up doing themselves much more harm than good.

View solution in original post

Tiffany, good advice, but in this case she received a 1 star feedback so it's unlikely whatever she does now could make things worse.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce

I disagree, John. 1 star feedback, if it's inconsistent with other feedback, can look like the client's problem...or like it was a blip. Ranting in response, regardless of the facts, creates an incentive for prospective clients to go elsewhere even if they don't believe the substance of the bad feedback.

 


@Tiffany S wrote:

I disagree, John. 1 star feedback, if it's inconsistent with other feedback, can look like the client's problem...or like it was a blip. Ranting in response, regardless of the facts, creates an incentive for prospective clients to go elsewhere even if they don't believe the substance of the bad feedback.

 


 I certainly didn't intend to imply she should rant, but I think she should give a rebuttal in a professional manner.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce

John K. posted:

 

@Tiffany S wrote:

I disagree, John. 1 star feedback, if it's inconsistent with other feedback, can look like the client's problem...or like it was a blip. Ranting in response, regardless of the facts, creates an incentive for prospective clients to go elsewhere even if they don't believe the substance of the bad feedback.

 


 I certainly didn't intend to imply she should rant, but I think she should give a rebuttal in a professional manner.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

I've always found it to be a good idea and try to practice to write down anything that potentially could be determined to be any kind of a rant and at least "sleep on it" before sending.  It's amazing how much wisdom that can be gained during contemplation thereof, and oftentimes things look much differently the next day.


@Pat M wrote:

 

 

I've always found it to be a good idea and try to practice to write down anything that potentially could be determined to be any kind of a rant and at least "sleep on it" before sending.  It's amazing how much wisdom that can be gained during contemplation thereof, and oftentimes things look much differently the next day.


In addition, it helps to not “rant” on an empty stomach. A good meal can do wonders.

 

I am off to my dinner-breakfast. Smiley Happy

"Certa bonum certamen"

@John K wrote:

@Tiffany S wrote:

I disagree, John. 1 star feedback, if it's inconsistent with other feedback, can look like the client's problem...or like it was a blip. Ranting in response, regardless of the facts, creates an incentive for prospective clients to go elsewhere even if they don't believe the substance of the bad feedback.

 


 I certainly didn't intend to imply she should rant, but I think she should give a rebuttal in a professional manner.


 Agree. That's why I said "be careful."

 

I also think it's important to keep her response very short.

I'm still pretty proud of my pure snark in my response to that one dude that try to screw me over and it went into arbitration. That guy deserved it so much sooo sooooo much.

Hi Jennifer. How did that arbitration go for you? Can you please describe everything that happened and how it resulted?

To put client's feedback in perspective, Upwork should also show the average ratings a client has historically given to his freelancers.

 

It's possible poor ratings are common with a particular client, but neither other freelancers nor a freelancer's future potential clients have any way of knowing this under the current system.

How have you seen freelancers "doing themselves much more harm than good" when responding to a client's unreasonably negative rating on their work?

 

What do you think is the best way to not do "more harm than good" when responding?

 

Thanks for your insights.


@Will L wrote:

1) How have you seen freelancers "doing themselves much more harm than good" when responding to a client's unreasonably negative rating on their work?

 

2) What do you think is the best way to not do "more harm than good" when responding?


 1) Many ways, such as the freelancer having trouble getting hired afterwards. Remember that a bystander does not know whether any given feedback is fair / unfair / reasonable / unreasonable.

 

But a lengthy rant just draws attention to a less than favourable feedback and makes it stand out, and often it is more harmful than the feedback itself. I have decided not to hire 2 freelancers because of the way they reacted to feedback and because of how that portrayed them.

 

2) Sleep over it and think about whether it NEEDS a response. If it does, keep it to a short, factual, polite (maybe even slightly humorous) comment, a line, maybe two at most, not a page filling rant full of irrelevant (to any future potential client) details.

ravi_iitian
Community Guru

@Fariha Tarannum R wrote:

How do you change an unfair feedback if the client blocks you? He falsely claimed I passed the deadline and gave me a 1-star review after giving a threatening message initially on the day of the due date. I have requested help from an UpWork agent. Will it be effective?


Hi Fariha,

 

If that client has a history of “abuse” or unfair feedback, customer support might be able to help, or at least, the feedback may not be used for your JSS.

 

What is the client’s history like?

"Certa bonum certamen"

Hi Mr. Ravindra!

Unfortunately, the client's feedbacks are pretty good. In fact, that's the reason why I applied to him in the first place. He has spent quite a lot money (like around $100,000) so all of it made me think that this must be an amazing client. I was ecstatic about this contract. However, life is pretty unpredictable after all.

lysis10
Community Guru

something I learned when I was on elance was that it's better to always be at least 24 hours early when submitting stuff to avoid the time zone issue. Sometimes I don't even realize someone is in the UK and you get a message asking where something is and it's 5pm the previous day in your time zone.

 

So now I always add a couple days to when I'm actually going to submit it in case poop happens and it just makes sure nobody can get me on stupid time zone issues.

 

I lost a bonus out of a time zone disagreement. I still say I'm right, but whateversssss.


@Jennifer M wrote:

something I learned when I was on elance was that it's better to always be at least 24 hours early when submitting stuff to avoid the time zone issue. Sometimes I don't even realize someone is in the UK and you get a message asking where something is and it's 5pm the previous day in your time zone.

 

So now I always add a couple days to when I'm actually going to submit it in case poop happens and it just makes sure nobody can get me on stupid time zone issues.

 

I lost a bonus out of a time zone disagreement. I still say I'm right, but whateversssss.


 Upwork should adjust for this. Even my Google calendar shows me meetings and deadlines in local time, regardless of the time zone in which they were posted.


@Tiffany S wrote:

 Upwork should adjust for this. Even my Google calendar shows me meetings and deadlines in local time, regardless of the time zone in which they were posted.


 True. UK is probably a bad example since that time doesn't make sense, but I have an off platform client in the UK that gets antsy if it's Wednesday at noon my time and I haven't submitted what I need to by then. It's due on Wed. So now I just send it on Tuesday to save us both the headache. He's what popped into my head with the time zone thing.

I feel the exact same way as you do, Jennifer.

Thank you for this advice about the whole time zone and deadline dilemma. I never thought this would be a problem as it never was before. Whenever the deadlines were strict, they were mentioned, including timezones and everything so I believe instructions were not clear on my client's part. What I regret most is that I gave him a pretty good feedback based on criteria. I only gave him 1.0 in the communication criteria. I hate myself a little for being too generous and ignoring the way he behaved so rudely. I wonder what will happen next year when I enter the real corporate world... Any advice with that?

purplepony
Community Guru
Yessiree bob! 😀
purplepony
Community Guru
This was in response to Ravindra's good meal post. Ahhhh phone apps. 😉
TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS