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Unreasonable but high promising client

babzward
Community Guru
Barbara W Member Since: Sep 10, 2015
1 of 45

I have one client (who I have referenced in a previous post) on another platform, who consistently demands high volumes of work on a short deadline, despite being reminded of my other commitments as well as my "regular business hours". I had originally contracted "about five hours a week", with the possibility for additional work if my schedule allowed. Currently I am sitting at 5.5 hours with this client and he is insisting that I do 50 150-word pieces for him, today. Based on my estimates, it would take me roughly an hour for every ten pieces, and I have many other works to do today (including redoing something for another client who neglected to mention the full specifications of the assignment, and therefore rejected the entirety of the first three articles I submitted... But that's another story entirely.)

 

However, the client with high demands, if I am not being taken advantage of, is promising me about double what my highest-paying other clients are. (I was told that he couldn't do milestone payments, but would instead pay based on my hours, at the end of the week, and have so far received no compensation for the work I have done for him.)

 

For the product descriptions he is currently requesting, I offered to complete 10 today, with the possibility of doing more if I finish my other commitments with sufficient hours left in my work availability for the day. (This is the same client that is responsible for me setting business hours in the first place after he demanded that I begin work for him around midnight.) Do I have the right to refuse additional hours until proof of payment is obtained? Also, do I have sufficient grounds to release him as a client if he does not pay in a timely fashion? This guy is a total jerk, but if he pays what he's promising, it would be worth it financially for me to pick up extra work from him.

- Barbara Herrera -
screeler
Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
2 of 45

i heard promises from one client before... but nothing came of it...

you'll get some solid advice from the seniors here. don't worry. Smiley Happy 

noirre
Community Guru
Hanna N Member Since: Jun 17, 2015
3 of 45
You have every right to refuse to work certain hours or refuse to deliver in a rush, especially when there is no money in escrow for the work you are doing or no hourly contract in place. You are a contractor, not an employee. You agree with the client what you will deliver and when, and if he insist on something you have not already agreed on and that you can't or do not want to do, I think you SHOULD say no. Otherwise, how can you assure the quality of your work, if you are not allowed to work within your limits?

I would also caution you to be vary of "need it now immediately" clients, especially in a case where their requirements change after hiring you. The only thing they usually are in hurry for is to run away with your work without paying.

Promises can't be put into your bank account.
claudiacezy
Community Guru
Claudia Z Member Since: Jul 28, 2015
4 of 45

Hi Barbara,
what you trying to tell us? There is another platform where clients are willing to pay double? Smiley Happy

 

Why dont you ask on the other platform, whatever is allowed here might not be on the other platform.

 

Common sense, you have the right to refuse any work that does not meet your expectations, terms or even mood.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
5 of 45

@Barbara W wrote:

 

 

However, the client with high demands, if I am not being taken advantage of, is promising me about double what my highest-paying other clients are. (I was told that he couldn't do milestone payments, but would instead pay based on my hours, at the end of the week, and have so far received no compensation for the work I have done for him.)


 Is it an hourly contract?

 

Are you using the tracker? (whether it is an hourly contract or a fixed rate one...)

 

Is money in Escrow if it is a fixed rate contract?

 

There *IS* a contract, right?

babzward
Community Guru
Barbara W Member Since: Sep 10, 2015
6 of 45

It is an hourly contract (the contract itself states one hour per week at the rate I have listed on my profile). I had attempted to use the time tracker on the platform I found this client on, but due to some technical issues, I was unable to get the tracker working. I asked the client if we should discuss a fixed rate or if I should manually log hours, and he determined that I should manually log. After each individual assignment, I notify him of the hours to be billed for that particular project, and an update of the total hours I have put in for him.

- Barbara Herrera -
petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
7 of 45

Barbara, I don't like any of that, at all....

 

I HOPE you get paid, but I would not hold my breath, personally...

 

The main thing though is that life is too short to work with jerks...

babzward
Community Guru
Barbara W Member Since: Sep 10, 2015
8 of 45

I know, I'm not really holding my breath either, but at the same time I don't want to run the risk of cancelling this contract just in case he DOES follow through on the payment end. I have already informed him that I will be unable to accept any additional hours from him this week as I have already gone over my quoted availability, and that I will be able to schedule hours for next week upon the release of payment. (He logged off shortly after I sent that message, without responding, which kinda struck me as odd, but... Fingers crossed.)

 

If he pays well, I can deal with him being a jerk. If he pays late or does not pay what he contracted, I will have no issues closing the contract, either. The price tag is more important to me - it's not like he's made me cry or insulted me directly. He's just a jerk, and I have a feeling that karma is probably punishing him enough for it. Smiley Wink

- Barbara Herrera -
screeler
Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
9 of 45

The beauty (one of ) of being a freelancer is that you don't have to tolerate jerks like when you're an employee. You're the boss and the client is the client. 

I hope you get your pay. 

Reminds me of being in an abusive relationship. Once I see the whole thing is going south, I'm out whether the guy's good looking or if he has money. It's a strange analogy but I just thought of it. 

babzward
Community Guru
Barbara W Member Since: Sep 10, 2015
10 of 45

That's a good analogy, actually! Unfortunately I'm a bit pigheaded and my only experience with an abusive relationship didn't end when I saw the signs for potential abuse; I didn't get out until the violence became actual instead of just threatened. You'd think I'd learn my lesson and not settle for subpar treatment, but apparently I'm a glutton for punishment with too low self-confidence to set my expectations too high!

- Barbara Herrera -
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