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Upping Rates/Leaving Clients

purplepony
Community Guru
Pat M Member Since: Jun 18, 2016
11 of 49

But, they will see Projects/dates she's working on...

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
12 of 49

@Pat M wrote:

But, they will see Projects/dates she's working on...


 yep, but contract is closed so screw 'em.

 

She has two weeks to sweat it out and a week of that she's in the clear because no new contract shows up until money is paid on it. Clients don't know this either. So they would have the second week to check up on her and see additional jobs, and really nobody will do that. Who has time for that nonsense? This is all assuming they don't rate her for at least a week after the contract is closed.

purplepony
Community Guru
Pat M Member Since: Jun 18, 2016
13 of 49

I agree with the OP; it seems "sneaky."  IMO for numerous reasons not everyone may prefer to utilize the methods you're suggesting, Jennifer.   In addition to the need for the methods to be effective, people should feel good about the decisions they make.  As you know, what works for one may not work for another...

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
14 of 49

Right, but she asked for advice, so you know that's mine. Nothing in the rules against lying. 

 

I dunno maybe she'll get lucky and the guy is used to it and just let's her bail. If that's the case, then anything she says including a lie will fly. I just think there is a whole lot less risk to jss saying you're going away or something and need to close the contract rather than tell them you want more money and want to bail. That might work if you've been working longterm for the guy but it's only been a month. 

 

If we want to be the morality police, the only thing she can say then is that she agreed to a certain amount but figured out that she's working too cheap and wants more. Unless he lied about the job description, it's on her for agreeing to work for cheap. 

kamicaldwell
Ace Contributor
Kambria D Member Since: Jun 23, 2017
15 of 49
Thank you all for the feedback. It seems like this should go smoothly. This was my second job I had (still new here) and once I finished they had more work which are set up as milestones after I deliver each project. It works good, I would just like to bid on larger jobs now but I wasn't sure how to end the contract. I let them know after I finish the projects already assigned, I will no longer be available for additional assignments.
jmlaidlaw
Community Guru
Janean L Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
16 of 49

Kambria --

 

Like many of us here, I faced pretty much your situation: a couple of good clients for whom I was doing work at what amounted to bargain rates.

 

I will give you an example of what I have been doing with one of my very personable, pleasant, but underpaying and PERSISTENT clients. (Note that each exact "script" and details vary from client to client.) After a finished job, when the client was being typically (and pleasantly) chatty, I said something like: "Just giving you a heads-up that I have had to re-structure the way I am charging for translations. I will now be bidding all jobs on a per-word basis, and not doing any more flat-rate work. This will probably increase my prices for the types of small jobs I have been doing for you. Of course, I love working with you, and I will try to give you the best rate I can, and I won't charge you rush rates unless I am swamped." Since then, the client has sent me at least a half-dozen invitations, and each time I have scanned the work, done a word count, and sent back a polite response, with a revised bid, saying that "I have done a quick review of the document, and the word count appears to be XX. My bid is based on my per-word rate of $.15/word. Let me know if that works for you." I then add some cheerful (and sincere) words about his kids or whatever. So far, I have done only one job for this particular translation client since I effectively tripled my rates from his point of view. (Not sure why he kept sending invitations... Maybe thought I was secretly bluffing?)

 

In your case, you could tell clients that for certain types of work you will be "changing [your] fee structure" so that you charge on an hourly basis, for instance. (And then, if they still want to hire you -- GREAT!  Just charge what your time is actually worth. It's a win!) In other words, tell your clients that you are making a fundamental change in how you structure your charges, such that you will be either refusing or counter-bidding on their next invitation. It will work out to be either a polite-ish "no" or else will be a way for you to raise your rates (likely the former, but who knows?).

feed_my_eyes
Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
17 of 49

I don't understand why this is a problem or why you need to get rid of them. Can't you just say that your previous prices were an "introductory rate" and from now on, you'll be charging $X per hour? Then it's their choice as to whether they want to give you a new assignment or not. 

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
18 of 49

@Christine A wrote:

I don't understand why this is a problem or why you need to get rid of them. Can't you just say that your previous prices were an "introductory rate" and from now on, you'll be charging $X per hour? Then it's their choice as to whether they want to give you a new assignment or not. 


 LOL Have you tried this? People with no budget (and she's probably working with a farmer) don't care. They will dump her and get pissed at her. I hate farmers, but I'd be a little annoyed at someone who agreed at a price and then decided later on that she wants more. It's a contract. Shoulda thought about that before you agreed to it.

 

The only way to get out of this is to lie. This isn't a legit company where she's had a contract for years and she needs to increase her prices. This is some chick who worked for cheap and now she wants more cuz she figured out she's working for cheap. That's not a reason to cancel a contract.

yitwail
Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
19 of 49

I'd make a distinction between hourly and fixed price work. With hourly, it's reasonable for a client to expect the rate to remain the same, but for fixed price work, I see no reason not to state that you worked for an introductory price earlier, but going forward it will be your standard price.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
feed_my_eyes
Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
20 of 49

She says "This was my second job I had (still new here) and once I finished they had more work which are set up as milestones after I deliver each project." I'm confused because it sounds to me like the project was over but she feels like she has to continue working for them indefinitely at the same rate. Obviously if she agreed to do a certain project for a fixed rate then she can't raise her rates in the middle of it, but It sounds to me like the client set up a new milestone, so isn't it up to her if she wants to accept or not? Surely she doesn't have to keep working for them indefinitely?

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