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Upping Rates/Leaving Clients

kamicaldwell
Ace Contributor
Kambria D Member Since: Jun 23, 2017
21 of 49

Thanks for summing up what I am trying to say. I did the project and there are new ones now. I am not trying to leave in the middle of a project.

 

The job post did say "this could lead to ongoing work" so I am worried its unprofessional to tell them I am done. (I actually tried but I was assigned more). They are super easy to work for and a great client, I would just like to spend my time on different projects.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
22 of 49

do yourself a favor and avoid "this could turn into ongoing work" cuz it's a bad sign.

 

nobody can tell you exactly what will happen, but we see this over and over and over again. I guess say whatever you want and hope that he doesn't hit your jss. That's all you can do.

researchediting
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
23 of 49

@Kambria D wrote:

....I did the project and there are new ones now. I am not trying to leave in the middle of a project.

 

The job post did say "this could lead to ongoing work" so I am worried its unprofessional to tell them I am done. (I actually tried but I was assigned more). They are super easy to work for and a great client, I would just like to spend my time on different projects.


Kambria,

Our clients (not our employers) do not "assign" us work. (Technically they can set up milestones and even new jobs without our input - it does not follow that we have to agree.) They offer work, and terms, and we accept or reject them.

Could, shmould. As Jen points out, the bait of ongoing work is just a way for a client to lock in low rates. You're under no obligation to keep dancing with someone who keeps stepping on your feet.

 

Speaking of feet, it sounds like you shot yourself in one when you replied, in effect: "I told you I'm not doing this any more. But I am this time." What about that response leads the client to believe your initial "no," or that your subsequent "yes" is the last one? Your action drowns out your words.

One of the most useful tools in the freelancer's toolbox is the ability to say no, and mean it, and to hell with the consequences.

 

Best,

Michael

gerrys
Community Guru
Gerry S Member Since: Nov 23, 2014
24 of 49

Maintenance.

 

You give them a "few" hours (per month). Period.

 

Your PERSONAL and other DUTIES dictate that is all you can commit, at this time; and AS A GOODWILL GESTURE, blah, blah.

 

(Before you know it, they are running their own errands; under YOUR direction).

 

It's called "managing the client".

 

Most will take and take and take  ... as long as you give.

 

Time (free or otherwise) is the most precious resource and cannot be "gotten back".

tlbp
Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
25 of 49

@Kambria D wrote:

Thanks for summing up what I am trying to say. I did the project and there are new ones now. I am not trying to leave in the middle of a project.

 

The job post did say "this could lead to ongoing work" so I am worried its unprofessional to tell them I am done. (I actually tried but I was assigned more). They are super easy to work for and a great client, I would just like to spend my time on different projects.


 What those of us who've btdt are trying to say is that this type of client likes having someone competent do the work for low pay. They are not keen to let someone like that go. A professional would say, "I understand, thank you for your time." OR "I really like working with you would you be willing to stick around if I raise your pay to $X?"

 

The type of client you are dealing with isn't going to raise the amount or give up a good worker easily. So, instead, they will ignore your notice, beg, plead, and manipulate you into sticking around. Your client knows how the system works, they know you are afraid of the JSS impact. They also know that having a milestone in place makes it harder for you to say no. 

 

If the client is adding milestones and won't close the contract, then the only way to stop the milestones from coming is to close the contract yourself. This is how you decline new work on an open contract. It isn't ideal, but that's the process.

 

Early in my career on Upwork, I had to close a contract and block a client to get the point across. He had banked on building a completely new website based on my (very cheap) writing and hadn't thought to ask me first. 

 

You'll find similar stories throughout the forum if you search long enough. 

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
26 of 49

True story:

 

- Thanks Bill for this new assignment but unfortunately my hourly rate is the double of what it was when we started. I'm afraid I'm not your best choice anymore, but I'm sure you'll find someone on Upwork to take over.

 

Bill's answer:

 

- Your new rate is OK, here is the document...

 

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
kamicaldwell
Ace Contributor
Kambria D Member Since: Jun 23, 2017
27 of 49
Thanks, I didn't realize how counter-productive it was to say this. Fortunately I did add the stipulation that I could only complete one per week instead of every two to three days so this gives me more time for other things. I'll have to plan my wording better next time.
tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
28 of 49

This doesn't help you with a client you're already in the discussion with, but when I have an ongoing client who isn't paying my current rate and I want to raise it (I usually don't raise ongoing clients immediately when I raise my rates for new clients), I tell them when accepting a project that I want to give them the heads up that I raised my rates recently, and I'll honor our prior rate for this project, but moving forward my rate would be. I tell them in the same message that I understand if that's outside their budget and they opt to work with another freelancer, so it's both easy for them to move on if they choose and clear that the rate isn't up for negotiation.

kamicaldwell
Ace Contributor
Kambria D Member Since: Jun 23, 2017
29 of 49

Okay, I finally did it and said no! I was “assigned” a new book to edit today (now the 7th in my “queue” that I’ve had to set up) and I realized I cannot plan this far in advance, nor do I want to. I also noticed while reviewing payments that my payment is rounded down always (if its 13,900 words, it is treated as 10,000 rather than paying the true rate or round up since it’s over 12,500).

 

Hi,

 

I just wanted to give you a heads-up that I have had to re-structure my pricing for editing due to the demand for my services. For new projects, my rate is typically $80 for 10,000-15,000 words. This is clearly more than the original rate we have been using, however, I can no longer accept projects at $15 for 10,000 words.

 

I have enjoyed working with you and I will have the edit for the book I am working on to you tomorrow. I will also provide the next project (XXNAME OF BOOKXX) at the current price within one week, provided you are will to pay for the 17,500 words without rounding down to 15,000.

 

If there is a different book you would prefer me to work on instead of this, please let me know once the (XXname of current bookXX) book is complete.

 

Once editing is complete, I will no longer be available to work on future projects at the current rate. I understand the importance of sticking to a budget. If my rates are out of your reach, I fully understand and would recommend finding a freelancer who is a better fit for your projects and budget.

 

So…I guess now I just will wait for a response and if they actually close out the contract when I am done with the next book. I don't know if I care too much about my JSS since I don't have one and have gotten good jobs or "interviews" without it, but a non-terrible rating would obviously be preferred.

 

I also realize now I should’ve asked them to fund the next project before it is delivered rather than afterward since I am asking for them not to round down, but I suppose this is okay.

 

P.S. Is there a way to close out this forum once my issue is fully resolved?

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
30 of 49

lol he rounded down. haha that's funny oh boy 

 

well, it's done and maybe he'll be all "wheee" and give you 5 stars and everything will be great.

Is that the going rate for an editor these days?

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