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Upping Rates/Leaving Clients

wtrabex
Ace Contributor
Winter T Member Since: May 11, 2016
41 of 49

@Kambria D wrote:
I may need to look at this too as I get more experience I suppose. I try to think of things from the client's perspective. For that rate I would expect an expert with tons of experience, both on UpWork and off. Currently, I don't have that so, I leave the higher paying jobs to the real experts.

 I'm a writer/editor/publisher. I've been at it so long that I consider myself an expert. I can tell you that even with my skill set, it's getting difficult to find jobs that pay any amount of money at all.

 

In any other industry I can think of, four years of experience and continual work in the same field earns you a pay raise, if not a promotion.

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
42 of 49

Kambria, use this for a professional guideline estimate.

http://www.the-efa.org/res/rates.php

 

As a writer/communications professional who has been freelancing for a long time - the jobs are there. Not always in abundance, but there are some good and serious clients around. They are willing and happy to pay good rates for a professional result.

 

You need to be able to read between the lines in some (or many) inadequate RFPs. If the job really interests you and the buyer comes across as sincere - your proposal should ask relevant questions. It's not about who you are. It is about what the buyer really needs v. what they think they need or how much they want to spend.

 

My rates are some of the highest for writers on the platform and I'm very selective in jobs I'll take.  I learned long ago it is more profitable, definitely more fun, and far more rewarding to earn more with one good client than 5 or 10 cheap idjits.

 

Added: Michael's statement about how you perceive yourself and present yourself is accurate beyond belief.  BTW, your profile is marked private so none of us can take a look and perhaps offer hints.

stencil_media
Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
43 of 49

@Winter T wrote:

In any other industry I can think of, four years of experience and continual work in the same field earns you a pay raise, if not a promotion.

 


 

Then give yourself a payrise and a promotion. What's the problem?

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
kamicaldwell
Ace Contributor
Kambria D Member Since: Jun 23, 2017
44 of 49
Thanks, that's very helpful. I don't do hourly projects, but this gives me a better idea of what the standard fixed price would be.
wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
45 of 49

Neither do I. For more reasons than I'll bother listing. Smiley Happy

 

Estimate the time needed; include in documented discussions or a contract that you and client sign and which automatically supersedes the standard U contract exactly what you and the client have agreed to for the price. This avoids creep. Additional work = additional fees via milestones.

kamicaldwell
Ace Contributor
Kambria D Member Since: Jun 23, 2017
46 of 49
Yes, but I do feel bad because once they sent seven future books for me to do, I said ok, even though it wasn't with an official milestone...my only hope is my current projects that are closing soon can counter act this for my JSS.
researchediting
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
47 of 49
There is accept and there is decline. There is no OK.
kamicaldwell
Ace Contributor
Kambria D Member Since: Jun 23, 2017
48 of 49
It wasn't official. The contract was going and they would send several books via message asking me to do them.
researchediting
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
49 of 49
"Offer. Or offer not. There is no ask."
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