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Re: Upwork Design Flaw: Job Success Score Blue Bar

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Community Leader
Michael John M Member Since: Jul 8, 2015
1 of 6

I just found out that blue bar does not represent the Job Success Score:

 

 

bluebar.jpg

 

 

This is a design flaw.

 

The gestalt principle of proximity states that things which are closer together will be seen as belonging together.

 

Therefore, the blue bar being under the JSS will be perceived by many to be the visual representation of the JSS.

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Ace Contributor
Tom C Member Since: Nov 15, 2015
2 of 6

Pretty sure that's intentional, to discourage clients from hiring anyone but the best freelancers, presumably in an attempt to save face if people have freelancer issues. I'm not sure that people with < 50% JSS actually exist though, and again, perfectly intentional, Upwork don't want to be seen as pimping freelancers who are less than 50% successful.

 

So you can debate if it's morally right or not, but I don't think you can fault the business rationale.

Community Leader
Michael John M Member Since: Jul 8, 2015
3 of 6

If you're right, then there must be statistical bell curve that shows that there are too many freelancers clumped in the middle.

 

This must have been the same reason why they have to implement the job success score in the first place - The data must have shown that there are just too many freelancers in the 4-5 stars range.

 

To further separate the wheat from the chaff, they implemented the blue bar, which is questionable at best. The freelancer-to-job posting ratio gap must have been wide for them to implement this.

 

I wonder if this is also the reason why they tightened the signup process.

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Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
4 of 6

@Michael John M wrote:

If you're right, then there must be statistical bell curve that shows that there are too many freelancers clumped in the middle.

 

This must have been the same reason why they have to implement the job success score in the first place - The data must have shown that there are just too many freelancers in the 4-5 stars range.

 

To further separate the wheat from the chaff, they implemented the blue bar, which is questionable at best. The freelancer-to-job posting ratio gap must have been wide for them to implement this.

 

I wonder if this is also the reason why they tightened the signup process.


Michael John,

 

Your interesting observations and questions might be somewhat conflating three separate phenomena.

 

Your supposition about inflated star scores is correct. oDesk data from several years ago showed star ratings rising in something like a hyperbolic curve approaching 5 as a limit.

 

The blue bar doubles the differences between JSS scores for the top 50%, and ignores the lower 50%. There's really no mathematical justification for this, and apparently we have to accept it as a marketing ploy, perhaps related to Upwork's express purpose of moving upmarket. Who knows what they might do to the scale now that 90% JSS is the default qualification floor for new postings?

Finally, tightening the admission criteria seems aimed at the bottom of any scale, rather than a massed middle.

 

Best,

Michael

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Moderator
Valeria K Moderator Member Since: Mar 6, 2014
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5 of 6

Hi Michael John,

 

In addition to Tom's post I encourage you to check out Garnor's post on this thread which explains why the blue bar shows the range from 50% to 100% by design.

 


@Garnor M wrote:

The purpose and outcome of the blue bar is actually a lot simpler than I think some are proposing here in this thread. We aren't expecting, nor do you usually see, users dissect the visual. Instead, it serves the purpose of drawing attention to some differentiation and driving more clicks/invites to freelancers who show higher scores. This is what you see on most other sites that have some visual display of ratings, etc.  With the blue bar, we're not trying to have a redundant repetition of the score.

 

That differentiation is further clarified by looking at the actual scores, which in this case appear directly above the blue bar.

 

Again, in our testing we did not see clients confused with the blue bar display.

 

Thanks.


 



 

~ Valeria
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Community Leader
Michael John M Member Since: Jul 8, 2015
6 of 6

Thanks Valeria for taking the time to reply. I appreciate it.

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