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Upwork mentioned (at length) in Guardian article

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Community Guru
Walker R Member Since: Sep 30, 2015
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Community Leader
Cristian F Member Since: Jun 21, 2015
2 of 7

Interesting article, Walker, thanks for sharing.

 

" Upwork, which estimates that it has 10 million freelancers from 180 countries on its database. They compete for approximately 3m tasks or projects each year"

 

That's why I don't like these big numbers, which I suppose they sound very sweet at the top corporate level.

 

Spam, scams, low bidders, ridiculously cheap clients, so called experts - they are all there, covered by these big numbers.

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Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
3 of 7

@Cristian F wrote:

 

That's why I don't like these big numbers, which I suppose they sound very sweet at the top corporate level.

 

Spam, scams, low bidders, ridiculously cheap clients, so called experts - they are all there, covered by these big numbers.

You're not wrong. Plus the 10 million freelancers bit. How many of them signed up and never even bothered submitting a proposal? How many did one or two jobs and never came back? Even if the average project price is $200, which is probably being very generous, and there's 3m projects a year (a lot of which won't get awarded), that means that each of these 10m freelancers earns a grand total of $1.05 a week after fees. Impressive!

 

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
4 of 7

So how much you pay for that link Upwork? 

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Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
5 of 7

I didn't read it all, but I liked the bit about robots. As I sat in the sunshine imagining the future of automation, I thought to myself "what if they eventually do invent transporter technology like on Star Trek?"

 

Some university in Wales managed to transport a sub-atomic particle from one place to another, so if they can do that, then I guess it's only a matter of time. 

 

But anyway... I imagined if they do invent it, then it's only going to get cheaper and more widespread over time. So it will one day get to the point where they can beam a bunch of seeds into the ground, wait six months or whatever, beam your veg into some giant industrial kitchen deep underground, beam the dirt off the veg, use lasers to chop them up, beam them into some boiling water, beam them out of the boiling water, combine them with the meat that they beamed out of the cow and beamed into the frying pan, beam it directly into your stomach, wait 12 hours or so and then beam it all out of your behind and directly into your septic tank. No need for houses to have kitchens or toilets, or bathrooms at all, as they'd just beam the dirt off you. I have envisaged a scary future. Maybe I should write a book.  

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
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Community Guru
Walker R Member Since: Sep 30, 2015
6 of 7

I have read lots of the comments there on the Guardian article.  No actual freelancers are commenting there.  Only the usual commentors.  Jump on their and tell The Guardian that we are not all low paid drones tagging photos (that is one example they cited).  

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Community Leader
Matija M Member Since: Feb 4, 2013
7 of 7

Mentioned three times total in the super-low prices / race to the bottom context (How surprising... not). You can change your name/rebrand yourself a million of times but public perception won't change that easily.

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