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Upwork, please allow all freelancers to see average pay for their respective skill categories

It would stand to reason to allow easy access to the average going rate of everyone in a specific category or trade.  For example, when setting an hourly rate, new freelancers are given the average hourly for their category.  This would inspire everyone to group together and charge a fair price based on the group as a whole.  This means higher starting pay and an increase in revenue for Upwork as well.  It would also make more skilled folks in different countries more aware of the global average.  

 

What say you guys?

16 REPLIES 16
prestonhunter
Member

It is not technically possible to do this in a meaningful way.

 

Skill categories may be helpful for finding freelancers and categorizing jobs, but there is extensive variation within these categories with regards to the types of work done and the levels of expertise involved.

Thanks for the response @Preston, please correct me if I am wrong, but is there not a system already in place when posting a job on Upwork that gives the user an idea as to what the expected hourly rates are for each experience level?  And further, is this not based on the category the user is posting the job under?

Yeah, but I think those numbers are just made up. I don't think those numbers are actually calculated from real work done on the platform.

 


@Preston H wrote:

Yeah, but I think those numbers are just made up. I don't think those numbers are actually calculated from real work done on the platform.



Preston, I would have thought that they would have based this on average hourly rates in the past.  Wonder if that would have been a lower amount than what Upwork hopes to receive commissions on.  Thanks again for the feedback!


@Benjamin H wrote:

@Thanks for the response @Preston, please correct me if I am wrong, but is there not a system already in place when posting a job on Upwork that gives the user an idea as to what the expected hourly rates are for each experience level?  And further, is this not based on the category the user is posting the job under?


 There is, but it is entirely useless and almost universally disregarded, for the reasons Preston set forth.


@Tiffany S wrote:

@Benjamin H wrote:

@Thanks for the response @Preston, please correct me if I am wrong, but is there not a system already in place when posting a job on Upwork that gives the user an idea as to what the expected hourly rates are for each experience level?  And further, is this not based on the category the user is posting the job under?


 There is, but it is entirely useless and almost universally disregarded, for the reasons Preston set forth.


 Thanks for hte input Tiffany, do you feel it is useless and almost universally disregarded because our clients have a specific price they are willing to pay before coming onto the platform?

Statistically, in the writing category, this would be insane. 

 

Why?

 

Unless you're setting some strict parameters and limiting the outliers ($5 per hour, per blog or what have you), this will SKEW the average rates.

 

It would need to be disaggregated by the TYPE of writer to make any semblance of sense. 

 

My "average" isn't going to align with someone else's "average" unless Upwork wants to pop in some ML algorithm such as Naive Bayes or K-means (or others I won't mention right now because my husband is measuring behind me and disrupting my thought pattern at this moment). The "features" I offer as a freelancer differ greatly from others in my category...

 

Now maybe this might work in other categories?

 

I understand the reason for the suggestion, but there are programmatic obstacles that Upwork would probably find unwieldy?

 

Plus, clients are prone to pay what they want to pay (human psychology trumps algorithms as the algorithms have yet to account for human Ego). I've made many suggestions to them (clients) including sending them a link to standard industry rates for writing and editing.

 

Indeed, just an hour ago I was approached to write an optimized 750 blog in a specialized area for $20. Mind you, I've written books (including a textbook) on the subject...but the only algorithm for that is: "Thank you, but $20 is far too low for someone with my expertise in the field. Good luck!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


@Kat C wrote:

Statistically, in the writing category, this would be insane. 

 

Why?

 

Unless you're setting some strict parameters and limiting the outliers ($5 per hour, per blog or what have you), this will SKEW the average rates.

 

It would need to be disaggregated by the TYPE of writer to make any semblance of sense. 

 

My "average" isn't going to align with someone else's "average" unless Upwork wants to pop in some ML algorithm such as Naive Bayes or K-means (or others I won't mention right now because my husband is measuring behind me and disrupting my thought pattern at this moment). The "features" I offer as a freelancer differ greatly from others in my category...

 

Now maybe this might work in other categories?

 

I understand the reason for the suggestion, but there are programmatic obstacles that Upwork would probably find unwieldy?

 

Plus, clients are prone to pay what they want to pay (human psychology trumps algorithms as the algorithms have yet to account for human Ego). I've made many suggestions to them (clients) including sending them a link to standard industry rates for writing and editing.

 

Indeed, just an hour ago I was approached to write an optimized 750 blog in a specialized area for $20. Mind you, I've written books (including a textbook) on the subject...but the only algorithm for that is: "Thank you, but $20 is far too low for someone with my expertise in the field. Good luck!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hi Kat, thanks for the input!  Not too familar with the writing category myself to be honest.  I understand what you are getting at with the outliers but I feel this would self correct.  Especially if freelancers were constantly reminded about the platform average.  This would help everyone too especially if Upwork enforced an hourly rate at the skill level of the category's average.  

I understand this would probably force more clients to post fixed rate jobs though which I personally will not apply for anymore.  In game programming, with the way folks seem to change their minds constantly, I end up loosing money every time.

 

ML platforms are certainly an option - the technology has never been as accessable as it is today.  But I am sure that this will not really be needed as I don't see this being applyed to fixed price jobs which is what I am assuming you are alluding to when speaking about your average aligning with someone elses.

 

I believe this would do wonders for the software dev categories!  There are some folks who charge $15/hr.  Software engineering professional services fees here in the USA start at $75.00 and that is cheap.  A company I used to work for charged $125/hr for its software engineers.  If a person was browsing freelancers and the average hourly was $75.00/hr then they would have to expect to pay this much for services at an entry level.

 

If the client cannot afford this fee, then the turn to Upworks less expensive freelancers to form a plan to get the funding they need to realize their software.  Or they ask for a larger budget if this is enterprise software.  Point being, they see that they cannot expect to get their projects produced for what they think is an industry standard based on some freelancrs who are simply ignorant to the average fee that they could be charging.

 

Geographic inputs need consideration as well.  Americans will likely be willing to pay more for services than say bangladeshi folks.  Need to think more on this one.

 

And lastly, I hear your pain in your last paragraph.  This is a constant in my field.  Client says I want a MMORPG in 3D with 700 hours of playable content, the best graphics money can buy, in app purchases, a chat system, and I want it to produce winning lottery numbers at least twice a week.  I'll give you $2,500 - that is good right?  Little do they know, this project (less the lotto numbers) would take hundreds if not thousands of man-hours.  

 

I wonder if we could start some sort of union....

 

 


@Benjamin H wrote:

@Kat C wrote:

Statistically, in the writing category, this would be insane. 

 

Why?

 

Unless you're setting some strict parameters and limiting the outliers ($5 per hour, per blog or what have you), this will SKEW the average rates.

 

It would need to be disaggregated by the TYPE of writer to make any semblance of sense. 

 

My "average" isn't going to align with someone else's "average" unless Upwork wants to pop in some ML algorithm such as Naive Bayes or K-means (or others I won't mention right now because my husband is measuring behind me and disrupting my thought pattern at this moment). The "features" I offer as a freelancer differ greatly from others in my category...

 

Now maybe this might work in other categories?

 

I understand the reason for the suggestion, but there are programmatic obstacles that Upwork would probably find unwieldy?

 

Plus, clients are prone to pay what they want to pay (human psychology trumps algorithms as the algorithms have yet to account for human Ego). I've made many suggestions to them (clients) including sending them a link to standard industry rates for writing and editing.

 

Indeed, just an hour ago I was approached to write an optimized 750 blog in a specialized area for $20. Mind you, I've written books (including a textbook) on the subject...but the only algorithm for that is: "Thank you, but $20 is far too low for someone with my expertise in the field. Good luck!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hi Kat, thanks for the input!  Not too familar with the writing category myself to be honest.  I understand what you are getting at with the outliers but I feel this would self correct.  Especially if freelancers were constantly reminded about the platform average.  This would help everyone too especially if Upwork enforced an hourly rate at the skill level of the category's average.  

Human beings rarely self correct. And I mean this in the kindest way (after decades of teaching and clinical psychology), your feeling on the matter doesn't align with human psychology. They (human beings) can be constantly reminded, but, if they are in a desperate situation, or in an area of the world where $5 for a 750 word blog helps them to eat for the day...well then Upwork can encourage all day long with its algorithms...it's not going to change either the freelancers or clients mind when it comes to low rates.

 

The constraint would need to be more drastic than, "Hi! Here's reminder that our writing rates on Upwork are in this range." How would Upwork enforce an hourly rate? It's not an employer. How would they police the issue? Also, how much $$ would need to be spent on increased customer service for this purpose?

 

Many people point the finger at Upwork as the weak link in this systemic chain (online freelancing), and while I'm sure there are improvements Upwork could make, the weak link is human psychology. For example, I'm constantly barraged with "WRITE MY TERM PAPER." What's beginning to happen is, to avoid their job posting from being flagged or their account suspended, clients are inviting me privately and being oh so careful to not reveal their "papers" are actually for school. Human beings aren't machines where we can simply program them to comply with TOS or a certain range for a given category. They're crafty animals that find ways to leverage any system to their benefit. 

 

So, unless Upwork wants to transform into a hiring agency where clients and freelancers are vetted then matched by a combination of algorithms and human assessment, this is where we are: a worldwide platform where anyone can post a job and the constraints to engage in this marketplace are limited to TOS (and internal systemic constraints within Upwork at this time). 

 

Believe me, I completely understand that the low rate jobs can be exhausting to parse through. IT's even more tiring to be hit with constant invitations for $5 blog posts, or $50 white papers. 

 

I understand this would probably force more clients to post fixed rate jobs though which I personally will not apply for anymore.  In game programming, with the way folks seem to change their minds constantly, I end up loosing money every time.

 

ML platforms are certainly an option - the technology has never been as accessable as it is today.  But I am sure that this will not really be needed as I don't see this being applyed to fixed price jobs which is what I am assuming you are alluding to when speaking about your average aligning with someone elses.

 

Nope. I have more hourly jobs than fixed rate jobs. My commentary applies to ALL jobs (in my own category). My average has many "features" as I stated. The experience and education listed on my profile is only the tip of the ice berg in terms of weighting all of the variables of my "average."

 

I believe this would do wonders for the software dev categories!  There are some folks who charge $15/hr.  Software engineering professional services fees here in the USA start at $75.00 and that is cheap.  A company I used to work for charged $125/hr for its software engineers.  If a person was browsing freelancers and the average hourly was $75.00/hr then they would have to expect to pay this much for services at an entry level.

 

Could be. I defer to other Upworker veterans in that category to comment.

 

If the client cannot afford this fee, then the turn to Upworks less expensive freelancers to form a plan to get the funding they need to realize their software.  Or they ask for a larger budget if this is enterprise software.  Point being, they see that they cannot expect to get their projects produced for what they think is an industry standard based on some freelancrs who are simply ignorant to the average fee that they could be charging.

 

Geographic inputs need consideration as well.  Americans will likely be willing to pay more for services than say bangladeshi folks.  Need to think more on this one.

 

That's why I mentioned the ML algorithms. They'll need to analyze the "features" of the classifications to better understand the clusters. At any point, however, there will need to be a human decision factor. Who should be making these decisions about what to charge for each category? What industry standards would be used? Should someome fresh out of high school using Upwork to start their freelancer career start out the same as someone who has a degree, or more, and penned articles in several major news outlets? Or, how do you determine which of the two are the "better" writer in order for them to be appropriately classified (even within the three levels)?

 

Again, I'm only referring to the writing category. Much like design, it's stupendously subjective. 

 

 

And lastly, I hear your pain in your last paragraph.  This is a constant in my field.  Client says I want a MMORPG in 3D with 700 hours of playable content, the best graphics money can buy, in app purchases, a chat system, and I want it to produce winning lottery numbers at least twice a week.  I'll give you $2,500 - that is good right?  Little do they know, this project (less the lotto numbers) would take hundreds if not thousands of man-hours.  

 

I wonder if we could start some sort of union....

 

As a former teacher, I belonged to a union. It was worthless and used teachers to leverage their own moneymaking scheme. Is this true for ALL unions? No, there are always outliers. However, the prior statement I made about human beings leveraging systems for their own benefit is always a proiminent factor in any system. 

 

Thanks for generating the discussion!

 


 


@Kat C wrote:

@Benjamin H wrote:

@Kat C wrote:

Statistically, in the writing category, this would be insane. 

 

Why?

 

Unless you're setting some strict parameters and limiting the outliers ($5 per hour, per blog or what have you), this will SKEW the average rates.

 

It would need to be disaggregated by the TYPE of writer to make any semblance of sense. 

 

My "average" isn't going to align with someone else's "average" unless Upwork wants to pop in some ML algorithm such as Naive Bayes or K-means (or others I won't mention right now because my husband is measuring behind me and disrupting my thought pattern at this moment). The "features" I offer as a freelancer differ greatly from others in my category...

 

Now maybe this might work in other categories?

 

I understand the reason for the suggestion, but there are programmatic obstacles that Upwork would probably find unwieldy?

 

Plus, clients are prone to pay what they want to pay (human psychology trumps algorithms as the algorithms have yet to account for human Ego). I've made many suggestions to them (clients) including sending them a link to standard industry rates for writing and editing.

 

Indeed, just an hour ago I was approached to write an optimized 750 blog in a specialized area for $20. Mind you, I've written books (including a textbook) on the subject...but the only algorithm for that is: "Thank you, but $20 is far too low for someone with my expertise in the field. Good luck!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hi Kat, thanks for the input!  Not too familar with the writing category myself to be honest.  I understand what you are getting at with the outliers but I feel this would self correct.  Especially if freelancers were constantly reminded about the platform average.  This would help everyone too especially if Upwork enforced an hourly rate at the skill level of the category's average.  

Human beings rarely self correct. And I mean this in the kindest way (after decades of teaching and clinical psychology), your feeling on the matter doesn't align with human psychology. They (human beings) can be constantly reminded, but, if they are in a desperate situation, or in an area of the world where $5 for a 750 word blog helps them to eat for the day...well then Upwork can encourage all day long with its algorithms...it's not going to change either the freelancers or clients mind when it comes to low rates.

 

The constraint would need to be more drastic than, "Hi! Here's reminder that our writing rates on Upwork are in this range." How would Upwork enforce an hourly rate? It's not an employer. How would they police the issue? Also, how much $$ would need to be spent on increased customer service for this purpose?

 

Many people point the finger at Upwork as the weak link in this systemic chain (online freelancing), and while I'm sure there are improvements Upwork could make, the weak link is human psychology. For example, I'm constantly barraged with "WRITE MY TERM PAPER." What's beginning to happen is, to avoid their job posting from being flagged or their account suspended, clients are inviting me privately and being oh so careful to not reveal their "papers" are actually for school. Human beings aren't machines where we can simply program them to comply with TOS or a certain range for a given category. They're crafty animals that find ways to leverage any system to their benefit. 

 

So, unless Upwork wants to transform into a hiring agency where clients and freelancers are vetted then matched by a combination of algorithms and human assessment, this is where we are: a worldwide platform where anyone can post a job and the constraints to engage in this marketplace are limited to TOS (and internal systemic constraints within Upwork at this time). 

 

Believe me, I completely understand that the low rate jobs can be exhausting to parse through. IT's even more tiring to be hit with constant invitations for $5 blog posts, or $50 white papers. 

 

I understand this would probably force more clients to post fixed rate jobs though which I personally will not apply for anymore.  In game programming, with the way folks seem to change their minds constantly, I end up loosing money every time.

 

ML platforms are certainly an option - the technology has never been as accessable as it is today.  But I am sure that this will not really be needed as I don't see this being applyed to fixed price jobs which is what I am assuming you are alluding to when speaking about your average aligning with someone elses.

 

Nope. I have more hourly jobs than fixed rate jobs. My commentary applies to ALL jobs (in my own category). My average has many "features" as I stated. The experience and education listed on my profile is only the tip of the ice berg in terms of weighting all of the variables of my "average."

 

I believe this would do wonders for the software dev categories!  There are some folks who charge $15/hr.  Software engineering professional services fees here in the USA start at $75.00 and that is cheap.  A company I used to work for charged $125/hr for its software engineers.  If a person was browsing freelancers and the average hourly was $75.00/hr then they would have to expect to pay this much for services at an entry level.

 

Could be. I defer to other Upworker veterans in that category to comment.

 

If the client cannot afford this fee, then the turn to Upworks less expensive freelancers to form a plan to get the funding they need to realize their software.  Or they ask for a larger budget if this is enterprise software.  Point being, they see that they cannot expect to get their projects produced for what they think is an industry standard based on some freelancrs who are simply ignorant to the average fee that they could be charging.

 

Geographic inputs need consideration as well.  Americans will likely be willing to pay more for services than say bangladeshi folks.  Need to think more on this one.

 

That's why I mentioned the ML algorithms. They'll need to analyze the "features" of the classifications to better understand the clusters. At any point, however, there will need to be a human decision factor. Who should be making these decisions about what to charge for each category? What industry standards would be used? Should someome fresh out of high school using Upwork to start their freelancer career start out the same as someone who has a degree, or more, and penned articles in several major news outlets? Or, how do you determine which of the two are the "better" writer in order for them to be appropriately classified (even within the three levels)?

 

Again, I'm only referring to the writing category. Much like design, it's stupendously subjective. 

 

 

And lastly, I hear your pain in your last paragraph.  This is a constant in my field.  Client says I want a MMORPG in 3D with 700 hours of playable content, the best graphics money can buy, in app purchases, a chat system, and I want it to produce winning lottery numbers at least twice a week.  I'll give you $2,500 - that is good right?  Little do they know, this project (less the lotto numbers) would take hundreds if not thousands of man-hours.  

 

I wonder if we could start some sort of union....

 

As a former teacher, I belonged to a union. It was worthless and used teachers to leverage their own moneymaking scheme. Is this true for ALL unions? No, there are always outliers. However, the prior statement I made about human beings leveraging systems for their own benefit is always a proiminent factor in any system. 

 

Thanks for generating the discussion!

 


 


 Thanks for engaging Kat!

 

You bring up some very valid points.  I guess the root of the problem really is then, that some people are just willing to settle for those $5.00/hr gigs.  I believe that some of thos folks can produce quality results at $5.00/hr - as much quality as one migh get for someone charging $50.00/hr.  If nobody settled for the 5.00/hr or if Upwork enforced a minimum of $50.00/hr the whole community would be better off.  If the client wanted the work done badly enough, they would pay.

 

For those that are inexperienced or have not proven the value they bring to a category, we can have an internship program.  The very definition of internship brings about feelings of potentially low quality work due to inexperience.  On the flip side, the word also bubbles up feelings of cheap labor.  Why not exploit this for brand new freelancers with no verifiable experience.  Once they have so many hours of internship under their belts, the move on up to the minimum for the category.

 

On defining minimums for categories, we can and should base this off of the average pay for a particular field or industry.  Theses stats are readily available for consumption on the net.  I guess we would have to take the global economy into account for the setting of these minimums.  That brings to mind a few options:

 

  1. Hold everyone accountable to minimums based off of the country with the highest salary 
    1. This would unfortunately kill the business of those countries with lower salaries due to clients located within those countries being unwilling to pay more than their national standards.
  2. Break down minimums based off of each country's salary info
    1. This would help with 1.1 above, but would present the same problem we are facing now; higher paid countries competeting with lower paid countries.  This drives global averages down.
  3. Segregrate countries and enforce minimums for each segregrated national wage
    1. This would solve the global averages being driven down
    2. Drive people off the platform for outsourcing, something I am sure Upwork would not be keen on
    3. Give freelancers less price competetion within their own countries
  4. Strictly USA based solution would be to tax the everliving hell out of services imported from outside the USA

 

Guess really the only solutions would be to ensure that the folks that won't settle for peanuts are at least given tools to help sort through the folks that are not willing to pay a true valuation of the work we perform.  Perhaps the can allow us to see the clients' average hourly rate paid stats for each available category as opposed to an aggregate which includes those extreme outliers?  

 

Don't get me wrong, I love the platform (though I did like Elance better) and they are an invaluable tool for my business; I just want to make things better for all of us!

Benjamin, Upwork will not implement any of your complicated ways to regulate rates. And if they did, clients will run on other platforms.

 

 

Professionals charge professional rates and provide professional quality to professional clients. Unskilled people charge peanuts to bozos and provide crappy jobs.

 

In both cases, Upworks gets its cut.

 

There is no need to try to regulate this.

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless


@Rene K wrote:

Benjamin, Upwork will not implement any of your complicated ways to regulate rates. And if they did, clients will run on other platforms.

 

 

Professionals charge professional rates and provide professional quality to professional clients. Unskilled people charge peanuts to bozos and provide crappy jobs.

 

In both cases, Upworks gets its cut.

 

There is no need to try to regulate this.


 Rene, thanks for continuing the discussion!  I understand that Upwork might have reservations about change, but I do believe that if Upwork can see an opportunity for a general increase in their 'cut' then they would be all for it.  

 

I disagree in the sense that only 'Unskilled people charge peanuts' - I believe this is a very ethnocentric view of what is going on in general.  Yes, some are unskilled and charge next to nothing but not all.  Some might just be ignorant to what they can potentially charge based on their own geographically limited experiences.  

 

And I am sure Upwork would prefer 20% of $75.00 / hour ($15.00 / hr cut) to 20% of $5.00 / hour ($1.00 / hr cut).  And when you take into account the sheer volume of hourly transactions on this platform, even an average increase in pay of $0.50 / hour will result in a dramatic increase in revenue.  The can use part of this to market their services to higher paying clients to replace the cheap ones who bailed.  

 

Lastly, I don't think it is too much to ask to get an average hourly paid stat breakdown based on the category you are applying for.  Do you feel this is too much to ask for?  

 

Thanks for the continued discussion and for your voicing your opinions! 

anima9
Member

Theory works on paper but not here lol

 

Clients even have price ranges when posting jobs and they still low-ball anyway.

versailles
Member

Benjamin, Upwork's business model includes the long tail of numerous cheap earners. They compensate low rates with the quantity of low-paid jobs.

 

Is this a sound business model on the long run? I don't know. I don't think so. But it's their business model. This is why their fees went from 10% to 20%.

 

They will not regulate rates, they made it clear in the past. You need to accept it the way it is. Upwork management makes its own decisions and freelancers are never consulted. It's their company and they manage it the way it pleases them. There is absolutely nothing that we can do to influence anything. Believe me, we have tried.

 

They even don't listen to us when we suggest bug fixes or usability improvements.

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
prahlad1981
Member

The Classical Economists pioneered by Adam Smith held the view that Laissez Faire or free-trade should be the norm - meaning that if you don't interfere in a market process and let it perform as it does, then supply and demand will both be in the equilibrium in the long run. In our lingo, this means that both freelancers and employers will get the best deal Smiley LOL.

 

Since Freelancing is a classic example of free trade, I believe that most employers and freelancers will already have a good idea of what the going rate would be for a specific kind of development work or a programmer's billable hours. In other words, all is well! You just have to look at the right place on the internet to get the stats you are looking for. Sites like the TIOBE index tell you what programming languages are in demand, sites like StackOverflow tell you how much interest or activity is there in a specific language. Similarly Github and Bitbucket will give you an idea about active open source projects. Upwork is just one marketplace in this whole vast freelancing world that cummulatively affects the supply and demand for programming and other digital services. Why do you think that specifically Upwork's stats should affect your decision?


@Prahlad Y wrote:

The Classical Economists pioneered by Adam Smith held the view that Laissez Faire or free-trade should be the norm - meaning that if you don't interfere in a market process and let it perform as it does, then supply and demand will both be in the equilibrium in the long run. In our lingo, this means that both freelancers and employers will get the best deal Smiley LOL.

 

Since Freelancing is a classic example of free trade, I believe that most employers and freelancers will already have a good idea of what the going rate would be for a specific kind of development work or a programmer's billable hours. In other words, all is well! You just have to look at the right place on the internet to get the stats you are looking for. Sites like the TIOBE index tell you what programming languages are in demand, sites like StackOverflow tell you how much interest or activity is there in a specific language. Similarly Github and similar sites will give you an idea of active projects. Upwork is just one marketplace in this whole vast freelancing world that cummulatively affects the supply and demand for programming and other digital services. Why do you think that specifically Upwork's stats should affect your decision?


 Thanks for joining in Prahlad!

 

I love the idea of a free market economy but as Kat said earlier people will take advantage of such systems.  I believe that this is one reason that the US has minimum wage requirements.  We can augment the free economy theory to ensure it is fair and profitable for everyone involved.  

 

'Why do you think that speciffically Upwork's stats should affect your decision?'  Honestly, this is because I search for and obtain paid work mainly through Upwork, not the TIOBE index nor StackOverflow.  And I don't want to wait for the economic globalization currents to revolutionize global trade and in so doing make the global economy a truly free market economy.

 

Now if all currencies were truly global: IE a basket of food in the USA cost the same $50.00 that it did anywhere else in the world, well then I believe that the free market based economy would thrive.  But unfortunately, this is not yet a world where we conduct business.  Thus, I believe that we need a thought leader to ensure disparities in fees charged are regulated.

 

There has to be a way to solve these issues that is fair for everyone.  

 

Main problem that is common to everyone, from freelancers across all categories to Upwork, is that we all want and need more money!

 

How do we all make more money?

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