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Re: Verifying Your Added Language

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Community Guru
Setu M Member Since: Jan 26, 2014
11 of 13

@Natasha R wrote:

I thought native was the language the person learned from birth.

  


A native speaker is someone who speaks a language as his or her first language or mother tongue. Native speakers can usually speak the language very well since they speak the language since they were born. A native speaker's language is normally the language their parents speak and the language of the country they have lived in since birth.

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_speaker 

 

Spoiler

A "native speaker of English" refers to someone who has learned and used English from early childhood. It does not necessarily mean that it is the speaker's only language, but it means it is and has been the primary means of concept formation and communication. It means having lived in a truly English-speaking culture during one's formative years, so that English has been absorbed effortlessly as by osmosis.

One can have been born and grown up in a country that lists English as one of its official languages and not be a "native" speaker. For example, Canadians from Quebec cannot automatically be considered native English speakers even though many speak English quite well; they were brought up speaking French as a first language and think in French (or Canardien, as I have heard unkind Parisians refer to it). But the rest of Canada does largely consist of native speakers of English.

Speaking "like a native" of any language means more than just knowing vocabulary and grammar. Many educated foreign speakers speak better formal English than, say, many Americans or British or Australians. But formal English is only one aspect of the language. Knowing instantly what slang means, what cultural references mean, how to reduce syntax to a bare minimum and still convey precise meaning — all these things, and more, are what constitute native speech.

http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/14582/meaning-of-native-speaker-of-english

In essence, native and accent cannot be exclusive with languages.

 

---- easy like Sunday morning ----
Community Leader
Mark C Member Since: Aug 8, 2015
12 of 13

The 'discernable accent' is, I think, a ridiculous way of saying that you can be easily understood in that language.

 

In some areas of the UK, travel 10 miles and one can discern a different accent.

 

Due to the fact that I spent much of my early life travelling with my father who was in the army, I acquired a pretty generic British accent, over the past 25 years, some slight Welsh accent has rubbed off in certain phrases, but hardly noticeable.

 

I live in Mexico now where there are many North Americans and, to them, I have a discernable accent (albeit a 'nice' one lol).

Community Guru
Natasha R Member Since: Aug 2, 2010
13 of 13

@Setu M wrote:

@Natasha R wrote:

I thought native was the language the person learned from birth.

  


A native speaker is someone who speaks a language as his or her first language or mother tongue. Native speakers can usually speak the language very well since they speak the language since they were born. A native speaker's language is normally the language their parents speak and the language of the country they have lived in since birth.

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_speaker 

 

Spoiler

A "native speaker of English" refers to someone who has learned and used English from early childhood. It does not necessarily mean that it is the speaker's only language, but it means it is and has been the primary means of concept formation and communication. It means having lived in a truly English-speaking culture during one's formative years, so that English has been absorbed effortlessly as by osmosis.

One can have been born and grown up in a country that lists English as one of its official languages and not be a "native" speaker. For example, Canadians from Quebec cannot automatically be considered native English speakers even though many speak English quite well; they were brought up speaking French as a first language and think in French (or Canardien, as I have heard unkind Parisians refer to it). But the rest of Canada does largely consist of native speakers of English.

Speaking "like a native" of any language means more than just knowing vocabulary and grammar. Many educated foreign speakers speak better formal English than, say, many Americans or British or Australians. But formal English is only one aspect of the language. Knowing instantly what slang means, what cultural references mean, how to reduce syntax to a bare minimum and still convey precise meaning — all these things, and more, are what constitute native speech.

http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/14582/meaning-of-native-speaker-of-english

In essence, native and accent cannot be exclusive with languages.

 


 

They should use the info provided on the link you shared. It would even be more useful, quickly see the freelancer’s mother tongue language, but since it’s saying “complete command” I assume this is why so many are selecting English as their native language, when clearly it’s not.

 

I remember so many us of questioned “no discernible accent” but we never got an answer.

 

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