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What Employers See

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Ace Contributor
Cathy W Member Since: May 29, 2011
1 of 10
Hello Folks- I've been taking tests, making changes to my profile, drafting cover letters, and sending applications. It made me stop and think that if I'm doing all of this work, then employers have to mull through many applications and I'm sure it's a tedious process. I guess it works both ways; but what I have begun to realize is that what employers see, is his/her need to be very careful in the selection process. So, I can't be perplexed when I am not chosen for a job as there are many other experienced contractors out there who have done their homework. I have a long way to go.
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Ace Contributor
Cathy W Member Since: May 29, 2011
2 of 10
lol....I loved your post!! Well, ya know, I was just putting it out there as part of the process. I guess what I should have asked was, how can employers really assess each profile, when so many users apply?? I just wonder if employers might skim over and just take the first few that come along. That's all....Smiley Happy Also, I am def. not negative in my applications, I just assume this forum is a somewhat safe place to express thoughts etc. I had my rate up very high in the very beginning; then someone else suggested that I drop it as it was way too high. I totally agree with you in that anyone in the western world can't survive on that rate. However, I have seen many job postings by employers who set their rate at .50, 1.00, 2.00..how can I apply for those when my rate is much higher??? I am having a difficult time setting my rate for those reasons. Thank you for your comment in regards to my writing skills...:-) I appreciate that.
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Community Guru
Natacha R Member Since: Aug 2, 2010
3 of 10

Well Cathy I still think $11 for data entry plus "0" oDesk hours/feedback is going to be very hard. But I also told you it was just my opinion and that in the end you would need to make your own decisions. I know many contractors who started at a lower rate and worked their way up after each contract. At least this has been my experience. We all have different experiences and opinions. Go with what you think is best. I saw your profile and first thing I noticed was "data entry professional", perhaps you could add more to it Smiley Happy

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Ace Contributor
Cathy W Member Since: May 29, 2011
4 of 10
Hi Natasha! You're right, the '0' hours and no feedback is a difficult place to start; and probably for data entry for the mostpart. I have been looking into other job postings such as; transcription, and writing. Those might be the jobs which would easily begin at my rate since it may be more intricate. Oh, I will be updating my profile as well...many thanks for your time, observations and advice/input. :-)
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Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
5 of 10
One of the most important things to know about what CLIENTS (not "employers") see is that when you write a cover letter, only the first sentence or first two sentences... About two lines of text in a medium-sized table... Is actually visible to the client when he sees a list of applicants. The client needs to click on your specific application in order to view you application on a page of its own.

So if a contractor applies to a job and wastes the beginning words of their job application introducing themselves, stating their name, where they're from, etc. they aren't being smart. They're restating things that appear in the table already. Get right to the point explaining why the client should hire you for THIS particular job. That is more likely to attract attention.

Remember: a busy client may get dozens of applications to the same job. A client doesn't want to waste time reading through all of them. If they can quickly choose one, they'll do so and ignore the rest.
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Community Guru
Setu M Member Since: Jan 26, 2014
6 of 10
Since this is useful information Preston, I wonder if I should still flag it as resurrecting a dead post?
---- easy like Sunday morning ----
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Community Guru
Jean S Member Since: Oct 22, 2007
7 of 10

Not only that...if the client asks a question then your cover letter does not show anything, unless they click on "more" and in green it's difficult to see.

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Ace Contributor
sathyashrayan N Member Since: May 26, 2015
8 of 10

@Preston H wrote:
One of the most important things to know about what CLIENTS (not "employers") see is that when you write a cover letter, only the first sentence or first two sentences... About two lines of text in a medium-sized table... Is actually visible to the client when he sees a list of applicants. The client needs to click on your specific application in order to view you application on a page of its own.

So if a contractor applies to a job and wastes the beginning words of their job application introducing themselves, stating their name, where they're from, etc. they aren't being smart. They're restating things that appear in the table already. Get right to the point explaining why the client should hire you for THIS particular job. That is more likely to attract attention.

Remember: a busy client may get dozens of applications to the same job. A client doesn't want to waste time reading through all of them. If they can quickly choose one, they'll do so and ignore the rest.

 

Several job posting (clients) insists on some strange code words at the starting of job application. The code word could be seen somewhere at the middle or end of the job description. If we could have read the whole job requirement then we could see the cord word. Else if we copy paste the same cover letter template then our application will get deleted by the client. I have been wondering how this is been done. Now I understood.

 

I always start with "Hi," as the first line and one line gap and then second line for job application. Time for me to change. Several thanks to Preston H for pointing this out.

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Community Guru
Lyam B Member Since: Nov 3, 2014
9 of 10

I would have to say the cover letter is the decider. I'm always pushing boundaries in my cover letters. I like to crack a few jokes, be a little cheeky, and make sure I really get th client's attention. It works. 

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Community Guru
Robert James R Member Since: Apr 17, 2015
10 of 10

Oh crap. The main part of my cover letter (where I display the websites I've worked on) is at the middle!

 

I'm changing my cover letters from now on!

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