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Re: What Is Upwork Doing About the Negative Effects of Dormant Contracts on Job Success Score?

tlbp
Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
21 of 29

Yes, must be paid to show.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
22 of 29

They say excessive amounts of no feedback hurt you. I agree that I don't like it either, but honestly you can close a few every update and be fine as long as you have some ones with feedback in between. I close them all the time. I tend to leave some open where the customer comes back every once in a while, but after maybe 2 or 3 months I close them.

danielmacharia
Active Member
Dan M Member Since: Feb 18, 2015
23 of 29

@Jennifer M wrote:

They say excessive amounts of no feedback hurt you. I agree that I don't like it either, but honestly you can close a few every update and be fine as long as you have some ones with feedback in between. I close them all the time. I tend to leave some open where the customer comes back every once in a while, but after maybe 2 or 3 months I close them.


Super! Thanks Jennifer.  

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
24 of 29

re: "I tend to waffle a bit though, so make a concerted effort to keep the proposals as short and sweet as possible.  Maybe I come across as abrupt(?)."

 

Doesn't seem "abrupt."

 

It seems "concise."

 

I like "short and sweet" proposals.

 

I have many things I could do with my time. I'm not interested in reading long proposals.

 

Depending on the precise nature of a job description, a "concise" job proposal (which adequately addresses the client's project and explains how the contractor will work toward achieving the client's goals)... may be a few sentences, or may be many paragraphs.

 

But the proposal shouldn't waste my time.

mandylula
Community Guru
Mandy D Member Since: Jul 29, 2013
25 of 29

Yep Preston.  I used to submit longer proposals, then I realised a couple of things:

 

1) I was not being paid to write full solutions to the problems in my proposal.

2) The clients were more than likley bored to death with all the detail.

samuel-wilson
Ace Contributor
Samuel W Member Since: Apr 21, 2015
26 of 29
Going back to what OP said. Instead of punishing the contractor for something they didn't do, why can't UW simply automatically pay the contractor a dollar from the client's pocket for each contract with no activity for a month? This amount would then be deducted for the work done by the contractor, if they are to work together again.

UW would be happy because they'd get they cut, the freelancer would be happy because they'd get a dollar a month, and it would make the client either close the contract so as to not lose any money, pause it so they can not loose the money, or eventually ask the same contractor for more work to get their money back.
petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
27 of 29

Samuel W wrote: why can't UW simply automatically pay the contractor a dollar from the client's pocket for each contract with no activity for a month?

 Run your own show!

 

Arrange with clients from the outset that you will log 10 minutes of time a month and get their permission in writing.

 

On hourly contracts: Problem solved.

samuel-wilson
Ace Contributor
Samuel W Member Since: Apr 21, 2015
28 of 29
So you're telling me the contractor should make sure they only ever take hourly contracts and always arrange for a special permission with clients who could still leave you bad feedback even if they'd agreed to this.
Sounds like a good solution.

Or, if it's like this for everyone, the client can't complain.
mirsadnuhic
Ace Contributor
Mirsad N Member Since: Nov 26, 2014
29 of 29

I accepted offer in March 2016 and I didn't log any hours against that contract, I didn't hear from client after i accepted that offer.

My question is should I close that contract and how it will affect on my JS Score?

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