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901ecc35
Community Member

What is the best way to negotiate with client while finalizing the job order

Hello Upwork family

 

I want to ask your valuable suggestion regarding  the best way to negotiate with client while finalizing the job order .

 

As per my opinion negotiating with clients when finalizing a job order is a important skill that can have very remarkable impact on our business relationships and its success with them.

 

What is your expert views ?

 

Ritesh kr. Ojha

India

 

11 REPLIES 11
alexandernovikov
Community Member

That's a question so generic there's no way to answer it. What is your particular problem when negotiating?

2bfd3e02
Community Member

If everything else fails, this might help.

bilsim
Community Member

Business consultants charge $1000/hr to answer that question. They will give you some models, but still, you need to analyze and judge individual scenarios yourself, and create your own approaches. 

 

Your negotiation power depends on many internal and external factors. Does the client have an alternative? Do you have an alternative? How much do you know about the client? Does your work control important outcomes? How important is your work for the client (many people overestimate themselves here)?

bobafett999
Community Member

Also, your rate is so cheap that you will attract cheap fraudulent clients.  So don't worry about negotiation.  Buyers you will attract are cheap price sensitive buyers.  

 

You talk about taxation and legal matters.  Do you have any experience and knowledge about those areas in foreign countries?

 

With your skimpy profile and expertise,  you will be making money for upwork via buying connects

I think he is charging low because he is new to Upwork or at least never had a job here as of yet so it's okay to go a little lower to get some reviews at first. My opinion.

It can backfire, though. Cheap clients will often extort a new freelancer for more and more work without more pay since they know they're worried about the review. And a good client seeing very low rates for past jobs may doubt that the freelancer is at the level they are looking for.

researchediting
Community Member

Personally?

"These are my rates."

"Can/could/would you..."

"No."

"But so-and-so does thus-and-such..."

"Other people's business models are not my concern."

"Why do you charge so much?"

"Because my clients are happy to pay that much."

The trick, of course, is finding a niche where that last statement is true, and there are enough clients to meet your income goals. After that, with perhaps a rare exception on your terms, negotiation becomes a thing of the past. Hypothetical conversations like the one I sketched out remain hypothetical.

Plus a Big Mac combo with a Milkshake costs $18 in the USA whereas it may only cost $5 in the Philippines HAHA, anyways great advice you gave on higher-rate clients.


Shane G wrote:

Plus a Big Mac combo with a Milkshake costs $18 in the USA whereas it may only cost $5 in the Philippines HAHA, anyways great advice you gave on higher-rate clients.


The cost of living in a particular country is irrelevant, and I would never mention this to a client nor use this as a defence for my prices.

tlsanders
Community Member

This isn't your problem, but I don't negotiate. I tell clients what I charge and they decide whether it's worth it to them. Pretty much no one I do business with--doctors, lawyers, taxi drivers, mechanics, restaurants, grocery stores, hair stylists, accountants, landscapers, shipping companies (and so on)--asks me how much I want to pay. Why should you?

feed_my_eyes
Community Member

I don't negotiate; I politely withdraw a proposal as soon as there's any mention of a client being "on a budget". Occasionally though, a client is making assumptions about how long it'll take to do a job because they don't understand how much work is involved, so when I explain exactly what I plan to do, they're fine with it.

 

When I first started freelancing and was reluctant to turn down any projects, I would try to negotiate the amount of work that I could do for the client's budget, instead of negotiating the price. Example: "Unfortunately, I can't design a 300-page document within your budget, but I could create a simple 2-3 page template that you could use to format the rest of the document yourself. Would that suit your needs?"

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