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What's wrong with the quality of jobs on this platform?

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
11 of 63

The issues and justifiable concerns about farmers are valid ... beyond a doubt.

 

However, U., like most other platforms, is focused on one thing only - bottom-line. The need to keep investors happy - or at least on-board.

 

Because U., again like their competitors, needs numbers to make it work.  Farmers bring job posts - ergo the numbers look good.

 

Your ONLY solution is to learn to speed read and then read between the lines. Find the valid gigs.

 

Look into other platforms that offer more niche marketing. 

 

And don't let it get to you.  Smiley Happy

jennguyen
Ace Contributor
Jennifer N Member Since: Oct 8, 2015
12 of 63
The options at hand look bleak don't they? Lol...I too see a plethora of jobs with rates like "$5/1000 words" and some of them even have the gall to ask for experts. At the very least, these content farmers and scammers provide a little comic relief (when the stress and frustration of trying to become a successful freelancer are at a minimum).

That being said, I still see an OK amount of decent paying jobs. De-selecting the search option for entry level jobs filters out some (though certainly not enough) of these ridiculous clients. You also have other options like setting a minimum for fixed budget jobs and finding jobs by clients who already have a history of hiring (as opposed to newbies).

I would highly recommend looking outside of upwork for jobs as well - other online freelancing platforms and real life contacts - because relying soley on upwork full time will probably not be as fruitful as you want.

davidd1008
Community Leader
David D Member Since: Jun 8, 2016
13 of 63

It can be frustrating, that's for sure.

 

Things like your JSS, your feedback, your profile, tests, etc... those all DO factor in. Believe me, they do. 

 

As a client, I can say I give a very cursory glance over a profile and I'm looking for specifics. I typically click away at the first hint of "Hi there, welcome to my profile!" kind of talk. So it does make a difference. Maybe it's not right of me to do that, but I know others do it as well.

 

Remember, you're pitching to people. And people do weird things, have weird hangups, and judgements, etc.

 

That all being said- I think its largely the seasonal nature of things. August was pretty slow for me and I got by almost solely on consistent work from regular clients. I don't think I picked up but 1 new job in August. 

 

But September is right around the corner and things should start to pick up. I've been invited to a handful of new jobs in the last day or two so I think things are moving in the busier direction. Hopefully anyway.

 

Yes, there's garbage jobs out there but they aren't going away anytime soon. If someone wants to try and pay someone $5/1000 words and someone wants to get paid $5/1000 words it is what it is. The real, good clients are still out there. 

 

 

walkerrowe
Community Guru
Walker R Member Since: Sep 30, 2015
14 of 63

@Shummas wrote:

 

 

"Are the quality of jobs in the writing category reducing?"

 

Maybe.  But to elaborate om the writing category, since June, I have seen much less jobs in the writing category that I target, which is IT.  I mean IT writing jobs that require technical knowledge and not just writing skills.  I only bid on a job if the client wants a user manual, white paper, or blog posts, and only if they want lots of blog posts over time and not just 1.   And I only bid on jobs from the USA, Israel, and Europe, because they pay the best and I work best with those cultures.

 

On any given day now when I look I see maybe 1 job worth bidding on.   Fortunately I have long term clients who want weekly blog posts and a new long-term project to write a manual to keep me going.  It only takes one of those manual jobs to keep you busy for a while.  But if I had to find another one quickly now that would be tough. And I don't think this is summer slump.

 

Ergo, based on this anecdotal evidence I would say that clients in my space must be using something else besides Upwork.

 

Walker 

miroslav84
Community Guru
Miroslav M Member Since: Jan 21, 2016
15 of 63

Clients come here requiring native English speakers to bid only. But they offer rates that are far below the minimum hourly wage in most English speaking countries. So what they can get is actually a native English speaking outsourcer. Those guys make money from large scale and volume of orders. In many cases the only thing farmers offer is -fulfilling their condition of having a native speaker as the delivering freelancer.

 

Farmers are condition providers rather than solution providers. So no wonder clients often get fooled. But it is them who want to save some money regarding to Upwork as zo a slum where everyone delivers for a pittance.

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16 of 63
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@Miroslav M wrote:

Clients come here requiring native English speakers to bid only. But they offer rates that are far below the minimum hourly wage in most English speaking countries. So what they can get is actually a native English speaking outsourcer. Those guys make out of large scale and volume of orders. In many cases the only thing farmers offer is -fulfilling their condition of having a native speaker as the delivering freelancer.

 

Farmers are condition providers rather than solution providers. So no wonder clients often get fooled. But it is them who want to save some money regarding to Upwork as zo a slum where everyone delivers for a pittance.


Meanwhile the farmer rates are even too low for developing countries and they also offer the same rates to freelancers from countries with high living costs. 

Edited to add: Just received a job offer from one of the biggest farmers on Upwork for a 1c-per-word-translation... I am willing to pay an amount of money per month for a farmer-free platform.

miroslav84
Community Guru
Miroslav M Member Since: Jan 21, 2016
17 of 63

How about lowering and limiting the number of Connects we all get on a monthly basis. On both paid and free plan? 

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
18 of 63

"Ergo, based on this anecdotal evidence I would say that clients in my space must be using something else besides Upwork."

 

No, I'm just taking all the good ones as my own. heeeheee

 

I feel kinda opposite as some people. I'm bidding but really my contracts are coming from pretty targeted invites and repeat business.

trothaar
Ace Contributor
Teresa R Member Since: Feb 6, 2012
19 of 63

I think it has to do with the fact that there's just not much demand for copywriting, period, except on the lowest levels. I've tried prospecting off of Upwork and ran into the same issues that exist here: Most of the work is in the neighborhood of $1.00 for every 100 words, sometimes less. Copywriting is largely considered unskilled work. Many companies just have the receptionist do it in between answering the phone.

 

I have built a specialization in cyber security, and I have a couple of semi-steady clients, but I don't earn enough to support my household, and I don't ever see that happening. Again, there's very little demand

 

I'm taking Coursera courses in Python and web development. I want to get out of copywriting and into something there's a demand for other than on the lowest levels -- and something you can't just have the receptionist do when she's not answering the phone.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
20 of 63

Teresa, I could not disagree with you more. When, back in 2010, I was laid off from a writing job, I never got the opportunity to look for work. Within three weeks, enough companies had reached out to me unsolicited that I was freelancing full time almost immediately. Many of these companies had significant backlogs of web pages, blogs they'd wanted to start, white papers they'd been considering, articles they wanted ghostwritten for their C-level execs, etc. that had been back burnered for months (or longer) because they hadn't had a resource to complete them.

 

These clients ranged from solo professionals to a regional hospital chain, an international technology company that may have manufactured your phone and an online service listing half a million rental units.

 

Although there are occasional gaps as there are in any freelancing field, there have been many times over the past several years when I've had to turn down good paying work because I just don't have time to complete it, even though I have an administrative assistant and an editor who work as needed. I typically schedule work 7-14 days out.

 

The backlog issue is so significant for a lot of companies that often if I run into a past client at an event or comment on a Facebook post, I'll get an email the next day asking if I'm available to work on something.

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