Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

What should be my fair hourly rate?

gmcotet
Active Member
Gabriela C Member Since: Feb 1, 2016
1 of 16

I have been working as PR for a short time, mostly as intern, but I have skills and I would like to keep working in this field. WHat should be my fair hourly rate to clients? Is 10$ ok?

screeler
Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
2 of 16

You could check out other lancers in your category and see what they're charging and what their skills are. 

 

How much did you make on your offline jobs in your field?  You could gauge your rate here by that, but I'm not sure that the rate you have is what you should be charging. 

 

Do you value yourself at $10? 

 

I know with my rate, I have to figure out what I can live on because I have to pay for Word subscription, anti virus, computer and accessories, internet/phone, and my medical. And I have to eat of course.  I don't make enough hours right now to afford any of that from my work, but they're necessities that I must bite the bullet for. 

 

Oh and don't forget your upwork %10 fee will come off that $10 so you'll make $9 an hour. 

and979
Community Guru
Andrea B Member Since: Feb 20, 2015
3 of 16

Hi Gabriela,

it's hard for me to determine whether hourly rate is correct or not. It's not even easy for me to understand if my OWN rate is fair or not... anyway, if you want to find your way on here, my suggestion is to keep your hourly rate low until you have built a good work history. You may be better than Einstein, but with a single job completed, even if you got a 5-stars feedback, many clients will look elsewhere. Don't get me wrong: I'm sure you are talented in what you do, but in my experience clients tend to look for stability and prefer freelancers with many hours billed and many jobs completed. It simply means those freelancers have already shown they can get their job done.

So, in my opinion you can rise your hourly rate as soon as your reputation as a reliable freelancer is supported by several (let's say more than 10). And when you'll have many great feedbacks, don't be afraid to ask for more... if you ask $10/hour and do a good job, you'll be always underrated if compared to someone that does the same good job for $20/hour... we all think that the more we pay, the better the service (even if it's not always true!).

Good luck!

hodgesh
Community Guru
Kholleras I Member Since: Nov 24, 2015
4 of 16

If there is a professional organization for your field, they may have a list of standard rates. You could compare your level of expertise to professional level and decide your rate accordingly.

lindseyhgregory
Community Leader
Lindsey G Member Since: Jul 28, 2015
5 of 16

So here is the thing with calculating your hourly rate: it's not about what's fair to the client, it's about what's fair to you. Clients see that you charge say $20/hr not realizing that as a self-employed business, EVERYTHING comes out of your pocket. Office rent, electric, phone, health insurance, coffee. Your situation, experience and location will also make a difference. So think about that when calculating your hourly rate.  

screeler
Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
6 of 16

@Lindsey G wrote:

So here is the thing with calculating your hourly rate: it's not about what's fair to the client, it's about what's fair to you. Clients see that you charge say $20/hr not realizing that as a self-employed business, EVERYTHING comes out of your pocket. Office rent, electric, phone, health insurance, coffee. Your situation, experience and location will also make a difference. So think about that when calculating your hourly rate.  


Exactly. We're not running a charity. We can't feel bad about what the client can't afford. If they can't afford a freelancer, move on. Unfortunately, many people succumb to dry begging and then the only winner is the client who might have been well able to pay the lancer's price.

 

 

If we do take a job at less than our rate, that should only be because we really think it's a cool job and it's easy, or because it's a path that might lead to more work elsewhere... things like that. It should never be because we feel sorry that the client only has $5 to his name. If that's the case, he/she needs to get a job and build up some moolah! 🙂 

 

If the client ran an office and hired someone, their costs would be even higher per employee. They're saving a bundle on health insurance, internet and servers, workman's comp, retirement funds, etc etc. when they hire a freelancer here in many cases.  

gmcotet
Active Member
Gabriela C Member Since: Feb 1, 2016
7 of 16

Thank you everyone for your answers. Now it's more clear to me everything. 

prospect39
Community Leader
Peter G Member Since: Aug 1, 2015
8 of 16

I agree with Heaven.  Check out the rates recommended by professional and industry associations in your field.

 

As an aside, I worked in public relations in the early '90s. Even then, my agency charged $100/hour for my time.  $10/hour is ridiculously low, even for a relative novice.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
9 of 16

@Peter G wrote:

I agree with Heaven.  Check out the rates recommended by professional and industry associations in your field.

 

As an aside, I worked in public relations in the early '90s. Even then, my agency charged $100/hour for my time.  $10/hour is ridiculously low, even for a relative novice.


In the early 90s, though PR was largely limited to qualified professionals in agencies or those with strong press connections and/or past agency experience.

 

Today, the  "PR" market includes a large contingent of people who learned how to write a press release in a job they had once or have read a book.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
10 of 16

If you have any real experience, you know your local rates. I know rates like the back of my hand in my area. I even know what my friends in the biz are making. 

 

Maybe even go to a hiring website and see what people are offering, so you can increase from there. If you already work in PR, you must know what some people are making. 

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS