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Who is wrong here?

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
11 of 23

@Risty S wrote:

I'm not entirely sure I follow. Do you mean 'be a shark'?


 Pretty much yeah. But I like to be of the feline persuasion so I'm thinking like tiger with a propensity to go for the jugular. 

rstamoulis
Active Member
Risty S Member Since: Jan 26, 2017
12 of 23

Haha I'm ok with that. I'll try to take your advice moving forward.

jcullinan
Community Guru
Jess C Member Since: Feb 18, 2015
13 of 23

Yes, it is still a problem even with a good contract - can't control the client, even when the terms are there in black and white. Hourly contracts mean that you don't have to haggle over additional milestones. You just clock in, do the work, and get PAID.

mtngigi
Community Guru
Virginia F Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
14 of 23

Yeah, just clock in and have someone looking over my shoulder the entire time - no thank you .... this is not my idea of freelancing. Clients will do what they will, hourly or fixed. 

jcullinan
Community Guru
Jess C Member Since: Feb 18, 2015
15 of 23

To each their own. I don't mind the tracker at all.

katrinabeaver
Community Guru
Katrina B Member Since: Jan 9, 2011
16 of 23

@Jess C wrote:

This is called scope creep. This is why I only work hourly!

 

The files linked in the initial discussion were the ones you agreed to do. Any additional files require another milestone to be funded. If they disagree, then you can bring customer service into it. You really should have responded to the message sending you a third file, to cover yourself then and there, but this is still scope creep and you should hold firm.


 I disagree it was scope creep. The client said almost two hours, he sent 2 files totalling 1 hour and 12 minutes, the next file was 25 minutes.  This is actually a mistake on the freelancer's part. After the first two he should have pointed out these two only equal 1 hour and 12 minutes, is there another file that was supposed to be attached.  When he accepted the project he agreed to almost 2 hours and 1 hour and 12 minutes is way off that so it should have been questioned before accepting the offer.  

 

I actually have clients do this a lot and a lot of times the client either miscalculated or forgot to add a link or the audio wasn't available yet.  So this looks more like miscommunication than scope creep. 

"Fairness is giving all people the treatment they earn and deserve. It doesn't mean treating everyone alike-Coach John Wooden"
jcullinan
Community Guru
Jess C Member Since: Feb 18, 2015
17 of 23

According to the OP the client didn't say anything about forgetting to attach a file - they said, "If you want, here's another..."

 

Definitely scope creep.

katrinabeaver
Community Guru
Katrina B Member Since: Jan 9, 2011
18 of 23

Nope.

 

Here is the scenario.  I never accept an offer until I have the files first to preview them. That way I am protected if the audio is bad, if I can't understand an accent well, if the file is more audio than stated in the post etc.  It's a buisness learning experience.

 

Besides the fact that the extra file offered still didn't put him over the two hour mark. When the OP sent in his proposal he sent it on the about two hours. So even if the file came later the client is still not a scope creep.  The OP put in his proposal for two hours worth of transcription and that's what he should provide. Nothing more nothing less.

 

A scope creep is someone that wants extra work beyond the contract and not pay for it.  The other file is not beyond the scope of the contract. 

"Fairness is giving all people the treatment they earn and deserve. It doesn't mean treating everyone alike-Coach John Wooden"
rstamoulis
Active Member
Risty S Member Since: Jan 26, 2017
19 of 23

The problem I have with this is that he didn't send me the two files after accepting the job, he made a post that said "Here are two files I want transcribed..." "They are about 2 hours..."

 

I agree I made a bad judgment call as a new freelancer when I didn't question him on why the total was off. But, to me, it still stands that he said "I want these files transcribed" and then listed two files.

 

If he had made  a mistake when creating his job posting, is it my responsiblity to honor the mistake?

 

I'm approaching this as fair as I can, but the thing that strikes me as odd and indicates to me that this was his intention from the beginning (to capture a freelancer in a trap of, "Well, he did say about 2 hours..."), is the fact that he messaged me a day later with the previously unmentioned 3rd file as if it was an offer for extra work. Only to later bring up that same file again, after the original work was completed, as if it had been mandatory all along. If it was a mistake wouldn't he have said, "here's the third file" right off the bat, instead of offering it as optional?

 

Again, as the advice of others in thread said, this was a chance to squash the whole thing. Again, I regret my bad judgment, but is it not out of bounds to expect me to honor this extra work? Whether it was an honest mistake or his plan from the start, it still seems outside of the terms of the contract.

 

The job was not for two hours of audio. The job was to transcribe two audio files, which would be about two hours long.

katrinabeaver
Community Guru
Katrina B Member Since: Jan 9, 2011
20 of 23

Okay I stand corrected. Just my advice as a successful transcriptionist here. Always ask to preview the audio before you accept a contract. It will save you a lot of headache. 

"Fairness is giving all people the treatment they earn and deserve. It doesn't mean treating everyone alike-Coach John Wooden"
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