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Will closing a contract in which no money has been paid hurt my JSS?

Community Guru
Antun M Member Since: Jan 27, 2018
11 of 26

Renata S wrote:

About two weeks ago I was hired by a client who said he would be sending me the work he wanted me to do in the near future. What I've discovered recently is that he has also hired a second freelancer to do the same work for 1/3 less than I charge. 

I am assuming that the work I was expecting to receive from this client may never materialize.

My question is this: Will it hurt my JSS to close a contract in which no money has been paid?  Also, will it hurt my JSS to have an open contract that is inactive? I'm not sure what to do in this case.  


When I have an open contract which is idle, first order of business is to contact my client. I want to know if we were to do this thing or not.

- If they are unresponsive, I close my contract and feel good that I don't have to be bothered by someone who doesn't care.

- If they respond vaguely, I ask for clarification. I deserve to know was the contract created just for fun or for work. I still feel good.

- If they do have work for me, I'm just happiest.

Obviously, I don't care enough about JSS; nothing I do is dictated by that acronym.

For your JSS concerns, await for Petra's response once again.
(saw it late)

Ace Contributor
Ambrož B Member Since: Aug 7, 2019
12 of 26

Renata,

 

Yes it will hurt (especially if it is fixed-price, because on hour paid contract you can still try to log some minutes, but with fixed-price you cannot). Only solution would be if you contact the client and ask to pay you sth.

But honestly, you do not need to worry about. You have a huge project history, so one negative "feedback" will not significally hurt your JSS. You are lucky because you are doing mostly with a lot of short contracts, and it seems that Upwork system is more adjusted to this kind of jobs.

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
13 of 26

Ambrož B wrote:

Renata,

 

Yes it will hurt (especially if it is fixed-price, because on hour paid contract you can still try to log some minutes, but with fixed-price you cannot). Only solution would be if you contact the client and ask to pay you sth.

But honestly, you do not need to worry about. You have a huge project history, so one negative "feedback" will not significally hurt your JSS. You are lucky because you are doing mostly with a lot of short contracts, and it seems that Upwork system is more adjusted to this kind of jobs.


Hi Ambrož, 

Yes, it's true that it may not hurt, but it does help to minimize the potential damage wherever possible. The impact may be larger during periods where I am not landing as many UpWork contracts. I would rather troubleshoot things where I can. I find it's best not to take anything for granted. 

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
14 of 26

Antun M wrote:

Obviously, I don't care enough about JSS; nothing I do is dictated by that acronym.


I would love to have that freedom, and I agree that in some fields, it's probably not a big deal. Unfortunately, I work in an area where people equate my JSS with my actual performance. For some freelancers, an 89% JSS may not be a disaster, but if you make part of your living proofreading and error checking, people may perceive this particular stat in the same way earned run average is understood for major league catchers in baseball, meaning you miss about 11% of the things you're supposed to catch.

(This may not have been the best analogy for me to run with because I don't really follow baseball. If you do and you want to jump in there with some free fact checking on my baseball knowledge, please be my guest.) 

Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
15 of 26

Renata S wrote:

Antun M wrote:

Obviously, I don't care enough about JSS; nothing I do is dictated by that acronym.


I would love to have that freedom, and I agree that in some fields, it's probably not a big deal. Unfortunately, I work in an area where people equate my JSS with my actual performance. For some freelancers, an 89% JSS may not be a disaster, but if you make part of your living proofreading and error checking, people may perceive this particular stat in the same way earned run average is understood for major league catchers in baseball, meaning you miss about 11% of the things you're supposed to catch.

(This may not have been the best analogy for me to run with because I don't really follow baseball. If you do and you want to jump in there with some free fact checking on my baseball knowledge, please be my guest.) 


Earned run avg (ERA) is actually a pitcher's stat, not a catcher's. In any case, the comparison that might serve you is batting average--the number of at-bats divided by the number of hits hits divided by the number of at-bats. And the point would be that a major league baseball player with a batting average above .300 is typically among the leaders in the league, whereas a professional proofreader/editor doesn't want any number close to their name that's not 100% or darned close. It's a perception thing.

 

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
16 of 26

Phyllis G wrote:

Renata S wrote:

Antun M wrote:

Obviously, I don't care enough about JSS; nothing I do is dictated by that acronym.


I would love to have that freedom, and I agree that in some fields, it's probably not a big deal. Unfortunately, I work in an area where people equate my JSS with my actual performance. For some freelancers, an 89% JSS may not be a disaster, but if you make part of your living proofreading and error checking, people may perceive this particular stat in the same way earned run average is understood for major league catchers in baseball, meaning you miss about 11% of the things you're supposed to catch.

(This may not have been the best analogy for me to run with because I don't really follow baseball. If you do and you want to jump in there with some free fact checking on my baseball knowledge, please be my guest.) 


Earned run avg (ERA) is actually a pitcher's stat, not a catcher's. In any case, the comparison that might serve you is batting average--the number of at-bats divided by the number of hits. And the point would be that a major league baseball player with a batting average above .300 is typically among the leaders in the league, whereas a professional proofreader/editor doesn't want any number close to their name that's not 100% or darned close. It's a perception thing.

 


Thanks, Phyllis. I was trying to make that one work. The reason the RBI stat analogy might not be a good fit for proofreading is that you can get 10,000 hits that no one even realizes you made. But if you have a noticeable miss, everyone lets you hear about it.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
17 of 26

That sucks, Renata, and yeah you should expect to lose a couple of points for it. 

 

My experience is that it's a pretty bad hit but I had 2 in my 6 months window at one time.

 

I had someone recently who found me on LinkedIn and then came to Upwork. I was a little annoyed because I coulda skipped Upwork fees until she contacted me here, but whatever she opened a contract here to pay me for an hour of my time. I have not had a lot of luck with LinkedIn and get more crap recruiters than anything else, so I took the documentation she sent me and billed 10 minutes to read it on Tracker. She paused the contract, got pissed and never returned. It was fine cuz I got money into the contract and closed it, but I didn't really feel like the phone call would have materialized anyway.

 

I agree that it's crappy to bill for something like that, but at the same time I gotta look out for me and this is the crap we got shoved on us thanks to the "please change my country to USA" people.

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
18 of 26

Jennifer M wrote:

That sucks, Renata, and yeah you should expect to lose a couple of points for it. 

 

My experience is that it's a pretty bad hit but I had 2 in my 6 months window at one time.

 

I had someone recently who found me on LinkedIn and then came to Upwork. I was a little annoyed because I coulda skipped Upwork fees until she contacted me here, but whatever she opened a contract here to pay me for an hour of my time. I have not had a lot of luck with LinkedIn and get more crap recruiters than anything else, so I took the documentation she sent me and billed 10 minutes to read it on Tracker. She paused the contract, got pissed and never returned. It was fine cuz I got money into the contract and closed it, but I didn't really feel like the phone call would have materialized anyway.

 

I agree that it's crappy to bill for something like that, but at the same time I gotta look out for me and this is the crap we got shoved on us thanks to the "please change my country to USA" people.


Thanks for sharing that. I wish someone at UW would realize that closing out contracts with no money exchanged can sometimes be the easiest way to solve things. 

I think I'm just going explain the situation to the client and just ask that he cover the minimum I could bill for, which seems to be 10 minutes. He can consider it a bit like buying me a drink for inconveniencing me. 

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
19 of 26

Renata S wrote:

I think I'm just going explain the situation to the client and just ask that he cover the minimum I could bill for, which seems to be 10 minutes. He can consider it a bit like buying me a drink for inconveniencing me. 

The client can also pay you a bonus of $ 1 or more.

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
20 of 26

Petra R wrote:

Renata S wrote:

I think I'm just going explain the situation to the client and just ask that he cover the minimum I could bill for, which seems to be 10 minutes. He can consider it a bit like buying me a drink for inconveniencing me. 

The client can also pay you a bonus of $ 1 or more.


Yes, that might be the fastest option. I didn't know the client could give a bonus if no work had been completed. But I still think I deserve the drink. Smiley Very Happy

 

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