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aggarwalsaroj
Member

Working Out Freelancer Fees

Hi Freelancers, I was just wondering if anyone else has faced this issue. I received an invite for submitting a proposal from a client. When putting down a quote, I specifically noted that the UW was 10%. I factored in the final earnings per article and sent a proposal to the client. After working out the final terms and conditions, the client sent me a contract offer. Incidentally, before accepting, I checked the milestone amount, and I noted that the UW fee chargeable is 20%. Since I had already finalized the payment terms with the client, I was in a fix and a very awkward position. 

 

In my opinion, I think freelancers should be clearly informed about the fee at the time of sending a proposal. Since the sections for calculating the fee are separately indicated, the software should present an accurate picture. 

 

Has anyone faced a similar problem before?

8 REPLIES 8
joansands
Member

What do you mean, Saroj? Upwork clearly states that their fee for any one client is 20% of the amount earned by a freelancer. When a freelancer has earned $500 for any one client, the fee for income from that client is reduced to 10%. That all applies across the board.

Actually, no! Certain clients that carry the "Featured" tag can enter into contracts where freelancers pay only 10%. I have an ongoing contract where the initial fee was just 10%. After working via this contract, I make it a point to check the fee structure carefully before applying. Hope this helps.

Saroj, I have not encountered that situation but I have noticed that sometimes an invitation specifies the fee will be 10% if I am hired. I am attempting to flag this to get a moderator's attention, who will hopefully explain what happened and resolve it for you, if possible.

 

I would appreciate that, Phyllis.

 

I have screenshots of both pages and I have contacted UW. 

florydev
Member


In my opinion, I think freelancers should be clearly informed about the fee at the time of sending a proposal. Since the sections for calculating the fee are separately indicated, the software should present an accurate picture. 

 


Um, we are, it's right there on the terms where you set the milestones or your hourly rate and it tells you what You'll receive...

 

Fixed Price:

ByMilestone.PNG

 

Hourly:

Hourly.PNG

 

kochubei_valeria
Community Manager
Community Manager

Hi Saroj,

 

Top Rated freelancers pay a reduced fee of 10% if they are hired on a Featured job. However, when the offer is made it has to be related to that Featured job. If the client hires the freelancer for a different job that wasn't Featured, the standard fee will apply. 

~ Valeria
Upwork

Thank you, Valeria.

 

I understand your point. Please note that I did not submit a proposal. I received an invite to submit a proposal. When I receive an invite, and I am discussing the terms and conditions for that project, I expect to be hired for the project that I am discussing.

 

How can the client invite me for one project and then, offer me a contract for another project? 

 

In any case, it is not for the client to work out the fee. That is for the freelancers to calculate at their end. And, we look at the fee that we're expected to pay according to the job posting.

 

Again, I have screenshots showing that the fee in the job invite is at 10%. But, when the client offers a contract, it is 20%. That just does not make sense.

 

Job invite link: https://www.upwork.com/ab/proposals/1259779308082794496

Contract offer link: https://www.upwork.com/ab/f/offer/12908895

Hi Saroj, 

I looked into this further and can confirm what Valeria has shared on her reply. The client sent you an offer that was for a different job post that was invite-only and was not a Featured Job. This may be because the offer you received is for a test job. If the client intends to hire you, they can do so through the job that you applied for so that the 10% fee applies.

 

I hope my response made sense. Let us know if you have further questions!


~ Avery
Upwork