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Re: Would you Hire Again?

Active Member
Kim H Member Since: Nov 13, 2014
1 of 27

Here's a thought, instead of using the term "would you hire again" for clients when rating their freelancers, how about instead...

 

How would you rate the work you received?

 

Good, I'm satisfied

 

or

 

Bad, I'm unsatisfied

(insert why here)

 

** Please note:  these are the same ratings used for freelancers to rate Upwork Customer Service agents. **

 

"Would you hire again" is not appropriate for some jobs and I'm pretty sure the client doesn't realize what impact that question could have on a freelancer's JSS.  Who knows, the client could give a thumbs down because they just didn't like the Upwork platform and never planning on using Upwork again.

Community Guru
Jean S Member Since: Oct 22, 2007
2 of 27

@Kim H wrote:

Here's a thought, instead of using the term "would you hire again" for clients when rating their freelancers, how about instead...

 

How would you rate the work you received?

 

Good, I'm satisfied

 

or

 

Bad, I'm unsatisfied

(insert why here)

 

** Please note:  these are the same ratings used for freelancers to rate Upwork Customer Service agents. **

 

"Would you hire again" is not appropriate for some jobs and I'm pretty sure the client doesn't realize what impact that question could have on a freelancer's JSS.  Who knows, the client could give a thumbs down because they just didn't like the Upwork platform and never planning on using Upwork again.


While I don't agree with your solution I do agree that question has got to go.

 

I am in one of those categories that all the jobs are usually one-off and they won't be back again. They want a resume done and then they're gone and so they could answer no when it comes to "Would you hire again".

 

The answer would easily be no. 

Community Guru
Suzanne N Member Since: Aug 15, 2012
3 of 27

That is not Upworks question. They use Zendesk for support and it is used on all Zendesk platforms to rate the customer support agent and the service they got.

 

That doesn't always work well either. Let me give you an example. I had a customer with my client awhile back that wanted to purchase the products we offered. Our products would not work for his situation. I discussed it throughly with him and they just were not going to work for what he wanted to do. I was nice to him and told him I am sorry but I just don't believe these will work for you and even gave him referrals to a company that may have the products that would work for him.

 

He rated me unsatisfied and then posted I couldn't buy your products as a reason.

 

Ok what did that have anything to do with my support?

Community Guru
Jean S Member Since: Oct 22, 2007
4 of 27

Thanks Suzanne. I didn't know that.

Community Guru
Suzanne N Member Since: Aug 15, 2012
5 of 27

Jean,

 

It doesn't mean for support the question is not beneficial. I have 100% Satisfaction. It is rated on a 60 day period. Zendesk also sends out stats on a monthly basis:

First Reply Time - The time it takes for your agent to first respond to a ticket., 

One-touch Resolution - The percentage of tickets resolved in one agent interaction, and 

Customer Satisfaction - The percentage of customers rating your support as satisfactory. 

 

It then gives you a percentage you are better or worse then others in your industry as well as rates you against others in your industry on if your percentage is higher or lower then the average for your industry.

 

It is still quite useful info. But like any rating system there are flaws.

 

Zendesk for instance does not take into account on response time holidays or weekends if the business is closed. It does not take into account instances such as I wrote about earlier, the feedback which had to do with he was not happy the product would not work for him, but it had nothing to do with the company nor the support. Only he was displeased it wouldn't work for him.

 

 

 

Community Leader
Sebastian N Member Since: Sep 22, 2015
6 of 27

I thought the question was: "How likely are you to recommend this freelancer to a friend or a colleague?"

 

And it always bothers me. Because one of my client's once said "I want to hire you to exclusively work for me" and in that case, wouldn't that client be not likely at all to recommend me to someone else? 

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
7 of 27

@Sebastian N wrote:

I thought the question was: "How likely are you to recommend this freelancer to a friend or a colleague?"

 

And it always bothers me. Because one of my client's once said "I want to hire you to exclusively work for me" and in that case, wouldn't that client be not likely at all to recommend me to someone else? 


 I'm almost certain you're right, and the question is the one that determines the so-called Network Promoter Score, and it was originally used by Enterprise Rent-a-Car to predict revenue growth (as opposed to customer satisfaction) and proponents claim it's superior to every other growth metric. So the objection you raised seems quite valid to me, because unlike a company, a freelancer can't really 'grow' and take on more clients at the same time, so how valid or useful is it when applied to an individual rather than an organization? (It may be more applicable to Upwork agencies, which can take on additional freelancers. Or maybe the intent is that Upwork as a whole is the organization so in effect what the question asks is "How likely are you to recommend Upwork to a friend or a colleague?")

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Leader
Sebastian N Member Since: Sep 22, 2015
8 of 27

 

Also to add on that:

 

I remember, after I completed my first job here when I was asked if I would recommend the client to anyone else, I was like.. heck no. I'll keep this client for myself.

 

After I finished my next contract I thought "Well, I don't know if any of my friends would fit the client's requirements. Better to not recommend this client to them.". (Basically I was rating my friends not my client)

 

Either way in the first few contracts I totally misinterpreted what that private feedback was about.

Then I eventually found out about it while reading in the forum.

 

I can imagine that there are clients who also misinterpret that metric, resulting in a bad JSS even though each party was absolutely satisfied.

 

If the friends/colleagues of the client can't afford the rate of the freelancer, would the client be less likely to recommend that freelancer to their friends?

Highlighted
Community Guru
Irene B Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
9 of 27

A better question would be: were the requirements met? yes/no

Community Guru
Stephen B Member Since: Dec 4, 2012
10 of 27

It's worth repeating here and at every available opportunity (although I don't believe anyone at Upwork has ever officially admitted it) that the client's question about recommending the freelancer is based on an "11-point scale" of 0 - 10. ONLY scores of 9 or 10 are taken by the system to be a recommendation. Anything below 9 can adversely affect a JSS. A client may think that a score of 7 or 8 is fair and reasonable for a very good job done, without knowing tat they are effectively marking the freelancer down.

 

Upwork has, I believe, a duty to let clients know this, but always remains silent on it, for whatever reason.

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