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Writing jobs in English.

screeler
Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
1 of 22

I'm kind of amused but still curious as to what your thoughts are. 

 

I see clients wanting proficient English writers with experience. I check out the applicants and even though they might say they're fluent in English and have written this or that and had great feedback, I notice that on many of the profiles I peep that there are glaring errors in punctuation or grammar. This makes me wonder what the client actually sees when he/she is wanting someone to write for their blogs or an e-book etc.

Don't clients investigate profiles before considering freelancers for the contract? Why can I see the mistakes and shake my head that the applicant is claiming to be a professional writer, proofreader or copywriter and the client doesn't? How do the freelancers with profiles contradicting their claims of being a top this or that kind of writer get jobs in this field if it's not because they charge the lowest rates?

Oh, and don't get me started on the tests on some of the profiles that show fail in different English based tests....... sigh. 

 

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
2 of 22

Some people want the cheapest writer. And then they wonder why they have a pure spam content penalty from Google.

 

If the content is just meant for trash backlinks, then they don't care. As a writer, it's better to target people who have real businesses, understand marketing and want something to put on their blog. Some people pitch out the articles to publishing companies to gain visibility for their product. This is real marketing, not the "article submission" trash you see most suppose white hat SEOs do.

 

Also, I don't claim to have 100% perfect grammar and spelling. Everyone needs an editor. So, anyone who asks for perfect English and spelling is a red flag for me.

 

Something else that I never understood was writers saying they copyscape their work. Why do you need to copyscape your work if you're not plagiarizing? I understand why clients do it, and I don't mind, but there is no reason to copyscape your work. This is a red flag to me as a client.

 

 

screeler
Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
3 of 22

i definitely don't have perfect grammar and spelling either but some of these profiles start making me feel pretty darn good about myself in that area. lol. 

adelewilkinson
Active Member
Adele W Member Since: Jan 13, 2015
4 of 22

It always amazes me. The ones that get me the most are the ones who are actually native speakers professing expert-level proofreading skills who have terrible profiles and portfolios. I often read through the feedback of these people, and there's usually not a single bad review, despite on obvious lack of skill.

stencil_media
Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
5 of 22

Yeah, I see it alot. You think they'd proofread they're portfolios for errors. 

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
anima9
Community Guru
Robert James R Member Since: Apr 17, 2015
6 of 22

Those reviews are only good because the clients themselves don't know what good English is.

 

Also, the only time I bring out my Grammarly and Copyscape subscriptions in the application is when the job requires strict editing and proofreading. I often tell the clients I paid for these should I somehow miss any detail.

 

But then I barely use them and I've wasted money -_-

zaidimariam
Ace Contributor
Mariam Fatima Z Member Since: Feb 24, 2015
7 of 22

I've actually seen job descriptions where the client states that they don't really need great grammar, because all they care about is seo and cheap articles. That said, I'm also amazed by people who can't string a simple sentence together without grammar and spelling mistakes (which are so easy to check these days with spell checkers), yet claim to be not only writers but proofreaders too.

 

While we're on the topic of writing, I have another question. How many of you write e-books for clients? I don't do that because if I had wanted to write whole e-books, shouldn't I write and publish them on Kindle myself? It's bad enough writing articles that will be published under someone else's name.

screeler
Community Guru
Mariska P Member Since: Apr 27, 2015
8 of 22

it's crazy really what people will pay for. 

I've seen the e-book job postings and I think the same...if anyone can write an e-book, why waste their time writing someone else's for pennies when they could get all the profits writing their own? 

anima9
Community Guru
Robert James R Member Since: Apr 17, 2015
9 of 22

I know an e-book reader here (she's been doing this for more than a year at $75 per book) and I asked her the same thing. She told me because she has no intention to establish a career in being author of e-books and how it would be too much responsibility for her. Not to mention how she doesn't know how to earn money from selling e-books so instead, she writes them.

zaidimariam
Ace Contributor
Mariam Fatima Z Member Since: Feb 24, 2015
10 of 22

I get that but I'd still feel bad seeing someone else credited for all the hard work that goes into producing a complete researched book.

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