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Re: bidding?

laurent213
Active Member
Laurent N Member Since: Nov 7, 2018
11 of 17

I am new to Upwork as a freelancer, and I totally agree with you, Martina.

I did not realize that bidding was the basis for every hiring transaction.

Very disappointing.

" ...the client knows what he wants and what he is willing to pay for it. The freelancer knows what he's worth and what he is willing to work for.../... it encourages the low-ball offers that we keep seeing"

r2streu
Community Guru
Randall S Member Since: Mar 20, 2017
12 of 17

"I did not realize that bidding was the basis for every hiring transaction."

It isn't. Sometimes I bid below the stated budget. More often than not, I bid above. My work and reputation speak for themselves. If the client wants a professional, s/he hires a professional. If they just want it done quick and dirty, they hire a low-baller. I see no reason to lower the quality of my body of work just to land a client I don't really want to work with. 

laurent213
Active Member
Laurent N Member Since: Nov 7, 2018
13 of 17

 Hey Randy,

You say " Sometimes I bid below the stated budget. More often than not, I bid above."

So clearly, it starts with bidding.

When I set-up my freelancer account on Upwork, I was asked for my hourly rate for a reason.

I should be able to apply/show my interest for a job without having to confirm or change that hourly rate.  My rate is my rate. It would then be up to the client to decide, based on my qualifications, if they want to hire me at that rate.

If the client wants to hire me based on my qualifications,  but at a lower rate, then they would let me know, and the conversation would start.

 

r2streu
Community Guru
Randall S Member Since: Mar 20, 2017
14 of 17

So drop in your hourly rate if it's an hourly job. The point is, the entire process isn't bid-dependent. Yes, it matters that you're bidding what the job is worth. 

What I do tends to be fixed rate because the time it takes to do the same type of job can vary for a variety of reasons. If the job is posted as an hourly job, I'll very often put in an offer but tell them in the text what my fixed-rate charge is. There's no reason you can't make Upwork work exactly how you need it to. 

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
15 of 17

@Laurent N wrote:

 Hey Randy,

You say " Sometimes I bid below the stated budget. More often than not, I bid above."

So clearly, it starts with bidding.

When I set-up my freelancer account on Upwork, I was asked for my hourly rate for a reason.

I should be able to apply/show my interest for a job without having to confirm or change that hourly rate.


 Well, why don't you then?

 

What exactly is your problem? That is exactly how it works.

 

Randy was talking about fixed rate contracts, where clients have a budget that is stated on the job post. Freelancers are then free to submit a proposal at that price, above or below.

That is meant by "a bid"

 

99d94a6d
Active Member
Melanie T Member Since: Nov 28, 2019
16 of 17
I'm struggling. As a client im confused why my bids are accepted and then I'm told it's going to be twice or more the amount I've put a bid offer out for. I'm very detailed and provide the artwork design to be basically, duplicated. Fiverr has also taken a turn for the worse too.
prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
17 of 17

re: "As a client im confused why my bids are accepted and then I'm told it's going to be twice or more the amount I've put a bid offer out for."

 

Melanie:

You are correct. The dollar amount that you state in a job posting is not necessarily a "final" number. Any job posting is the "beginning of a conversation."

 

It is absolutely possible for a freelancer to look at your stated dollar amount and send a proposal in which he agrees to do a particular job for that amount.

 

But that is not a requirement. A freelancer may suggest a lower amount. Or a higher amount.

 

After talking to you further, a freelancer may provide a different number altogether - different from your stated dollar amount and different from his original quote that he sent in with his proposal.

 

If you have a strong desire to pay a specific amount, then you may state this in a job posting: "The budget of $100 is not negotiable. Please bid on this job if that amount is acceptable to you."

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