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fed up with ridiculous budgets from some clients

charles_kozierok
Community Guru
Charles K Member Since: Mar 6, 2017
11 of 14

What Rene said.

 

Is $50 an hour "$", "$$" or "$$$"? There are people on this site who wouldn't look at a job for $50 an hour. There are people on this site who make $50 a week.

 

You have to filter with your eyes. Personally, I just use this as an indicator of how seriously the client takes the project and/or how complex it is. Most of the time, I interpret these as follows: "$" means "probably not worth more than a quick glance"; "$$" means "worth consideration but check carefully"; "$$$" means "worth looking at".

 

Others have different approaches.

 

Regardless, fixed numbers don't make sense.

stencil_media
Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
12 of 14

And what's $$$? $16 to $20? So if I bid $21 or higher, which I do in 99% of instances... the client is going to think... "hey, what's the deal here?! I thought the maximum was $20? There's no $$$$ category. You're trying to rip me off!".

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
13 of 14

@Scott E wrote:

And what's $$$? $16 to $20? So if I bid $21 or higher, which I do in 99% of instances... the client is going to think... "hey, what's the deal here?! I thought the maximum was $20? There's no $$$$ category. You're trying to rip me off!".


 Exactly!! Thank you, Scott Smiley Happy

 

The more detailed the parameters, the greater likelihood that clients will have a narrow expectation of that value. 

 

It's a fundamental humanzee algorithm. 

 

They default to a singularity particularly when their cognitive load is increased. 

 

And with so many features they're dealing with on Upwork (fake freelancers, figuring out who is the best for their job, wanting to get the job DONE or being pressured from someone else to get the job completed ASAP), you're gonna be sorry you narrowed the scope of values.

 

Yes. I used "gonna."

 

LOL.

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
14 of 14

The majority of clients don't care about pay ranges or hourly rates. They are interested in getting something done, and they are interested in value.

 

If your proposal makes it clear that you will help them accomplish their goals and that you will provide real value for what they are spending, that's what they're looking for.

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