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individual proposial vs copy-paste

silw
Community Guru
Aron H Member Since: Mar 29, 2017
1 of 13

Hey,

during the past months, I experimented with a couple of different approached to send out job-proposals.
While I started with the typical copy-paste proposals to as many jobs as I can find,
over time I switched to semi-adjusted proposals and recently tried fully individual and handwritten proposals.

From googling clients to their social media account and company websites.


My impressions are: it makes no difference.
The number of proposals that convert into a job interview and at the end a hiring is the same like they were when I copy-pasted them.


I am wondering if it is worth it to invest 1-2 hours for one proposal when I could spam out 20 of them in that time.

What are your experiences? Am I just doing something wrong and you experienced a big increase in interviews when you switched from copy-paste to handwritten?

Share me your experiences, please.

Best

Aron

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
2 of 13

uhh 1-2 hours? I spend like 5 minutes and rage with that stupid new milestone I have to fill in. All I need is 5 mins. 

 

I guess it could depend on how fast you type. 1-2 hours is too long but you're wrong about the other stuff.

silw
Community Guru
Aron H Member Since: Mar 29, 2017
3 of 13

then I suppose my handwritten proposals are so **bleep**ty that people think they are spam. Smiley Wink

the amount of time doesn't origin by the writing aspect.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
4 of 13

I don't know what you mean by handwritten. You mean like you create a new one every time? 

 

1-2 hours is way too long. It would be worth it if you are dealing with larger projects where you make $50k, but we're talking about a few hundred maybe thousand bucks for a project so spending that time isn't worth it.

 

Part of a good proposal is experience knowing what people want. That's one huge difference between an experienced professional and some poser.

tlbp
Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
5 of 13

Create some standard content that you use to describe yourself and save to a proposal file. Then, to personalize each proposal, just use the information available in the job listing. Your purpose at this point should be to convey that you've read the job listing.

 

Of course, you should also include a brief comment about why you are a good fit for the particular job. But if you know your UVP, this doesn't have to be a completely original statement. (You bring the same  or similar skills and benefits to each job you do.)

 

If a client expresses interest AND the total contract amount is significant, then it might be worth investing more time. This should only happen if you are on the shortlist and you highly value the job. Otherwise, you will find yourself working more on asking for jobs than earning at jobs. 

 

TL;DR The time invested in crafting a proposal should be proportionate to the potential value of the contract. 

silw
Community Guru
Aron H Member Since: Mar 29, 2017
6 of 13

i think i am getting misunderstood here.

i was not asking for advice, i was asking for other peoople experiences on that subject.

tlbp
Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
7 of 13

@Aron H wrote:

Hey,

during the past months, I experimented with a couple of different approached to send out job-proposals.
While I started with the typical copy-paste proposals to as many jobs as I can find,
over time I switched to semi-adjusted proposals and recently tried fully individual and handwritten proposals.

From googling clients to their social media account and company websites.


My impressions are: it makes no difference.
The number of proposals that convert into a job interview and at the end a hiring is the same like they were when I copy-pasted them.


I am wondering if it is worth it to invest 1-2 hours for one proposal when I could spam out 20 of them in that time.

 

No. It is not worth spending one to two hours for one proposal. 

What are your experiences? Am I just doing something wrong and you experienced a big increase in interviews when you switched from copy-paste to handwritten?

 

I can't imagine how it is possible to respond to a job using just a copy-paste proposal. I may used similar elements. But each proposal addresses the specific job request. So I cannot make a comparison. 

Share me your experiences, please.

 

I shared my experience. It was labeled as unwanted advice. 


Best

Aron


 

sam-sly
Community Guru
Samantha S Member Since: Jun 23, 2016
8 of 13

That isn't my experience. But it is in my best interest if other freelancers believe they will see the same results with copy-paste propossals. And maybe they will (well written copy-paste may be better than poorly written custom propossals if the copy/paste actually fits the job). So yes, please just copy and paste your propossals if you prefer.

 

I have won contracts because I was the only one who took the time to write a custom propossal. I haven't done the math to compare the conversion rate overall. I just know that was the specific reason a couple clients gave when I asked. I have never spent an hour on an Upwork propossal though and have never send "copy-paste" propossals. 

stefan-c
Community Guru
Stefan C Member Since: Nov 1, 2011
9 of 13

@Aron H wrote:

My impressions are: it makes no difference.



 

Ok, so we’re talking cover letters.

 

I think it makes no difference because you’re negating the "benefit" of a custom cover letter.

 

If a client wanted you to know more about his business or himself, he would have put that in the job description. If you’re researching the client/client’s business, and if you’re drafting your cover letter based on whatever findings, you might freak some clients out and look like a stalker. It seems to me like you might be over-researching.

 

The benefit of a custom cover letter is letting the client know you have read and maybe understood the job description, as opposite to other applicants that just are just copy/pasting from a can. It’s probably not smart to bore clients to death with your cover letter (be it custom, or otherwise), although some might appreciate that.

 

Watch out though - your proposals need to be “clear, include enough information, and relevant to the job you apply for”.

 

I for one have received a warning from Upwork today - it seems like they’ve reviewed some of my custom proposals, and two of them didn’t met the above guidelines. Actually, they’re not just “guidelines", it appears there is a “Job Proposal policy” somewhere in the UA.

 

How did I manage to get my proposals reviewed, you ask? Well, I think it’s because a nice person declined my proposal to his “job” with the reason: “applicant requesting to work outside of Upwork”. I didn’t, and I consider that proposal to have met the guidelines - after all, the “client” wrote 1 line, I wrote like 2+ lines.

 

Imagine that.. my “marketing effectiveness” stats (viewed/interviewed) were always over the average, 97% of my clients would recommend me, I have like 67% long term clients and 100% success, and all this time I was doing it all WRONG! Maybe I should take that warning as a subtile advice and switch to a canned cover letter. Smiley Sad

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
10 of 13

I have never copy and pasted anything in any job proposal. I type every word from scratch. My job proposals are very successful.

 

If you are a competing freelancer and you know that I am bidding on a job, you may as well not bother applying to the job.

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