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individual proposial vs copy-paste

setumonroe
Community Guru
Setu M Member Since: Jan 26, 2014
11 of 13

@Preston H wrote:

If you are a competing freelancer and you know that I am bidding on a job, you may as well not bother applying to the job.


Stellar.... Preston's confidence is as solid as ever.

 

@ Aron

Not because you qualify for a job means you should apply. You need to be more selective.

I apply for jobs that I think I'm the only person who can accomplish the task - of course that is not true - but you get the idea.

---- easy like Sunday morning ----
lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
12 of 13

@Preston H wrote:

I have never copy and pasted anything in any job proposal. I type every word from scratch. My job proposals are very successful.

 

If you are a competing freelancer and you know that I am bidding on a job, you may as well not bother applying to the job.


 lol this made me LOL for realz cuz I'm the same way. MOVE OVER passionate writers let the real HBIC get this one, losers.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
13 of 13

Aron, I've never copy-pasted a proposal, but most of my proposals end up being substantially similar, and my success rate is high.

 

That said, I think you may have misinterpreted what people say here about customizing proposals. It's about being responsive to what the client has said about the job and his/her needs, and it generally adds about two minutes to the process of constructing a bid.

 

In some cases, with large, complex projects, I may invest 10-15 in a bid, and in those cases I do believe it makes a difference. For example, if a client is looking to overhaul and restructure a 40-page website, I'll look at the structure and a few pages of existing content and tell the client what type of changes I would make. In my experience, that draws a response every time. 

 

Short version: I think with a small, straightforward project where there isn't a lot to say about the project, it doesn't make a difference. In a proposal for an ongoing law firm blogging gig, for example, I pretty much say the same thing every time, and it's more about my background than the job. But, if the job requires specific planning, tailoring, etc., then it's beneficial to talk about specifics.

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