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noirre
Community Guru
Hanna N Member Since: Jun 17, 2015
11 of 24

You're right John, even NaNoWriMo gives you a month to reach 10,000 words. 😛

ilanherman
Active Member
ilan h Member Since: Mar 22, 2016
12 of 24

it's a novella, and even a most prolific writer would average no more than 2500 words a day (unless he wrote total crap) so that adds up to 10 days with final edit, devided by 170$ is 17 dollars a day. considering a day's work is 6 hours, the writer will average $2.90 an hour.....

yowiedesign
Community Guru
Craig A Member Since: Jan 18, 2016
13 of 24

@MERCY N wrote:
"am i reading correctly???? ill b lucky to earn a dollar an hour... someone please explain what the %^&&* is going on here?"
 
ilan, this represents $1:100 words. It's a fixed rate job not an hourly job. 
 
 
 

 i think that is the whole point of this post. To complete this project at the fixed rate supplied would mean an hourly rate of $1 per hour. 

m_njari
Community Guru
MERCY N Member Since: May 6, 2015
14 of 24

Hi guys!

 

The original post has been edited, so most of you don't have the initial picture which I responded to. 

 

It indicated that the client would like a book comprising 17,000 words. As you can see, the budget is $170 and the job is fixed.

 

When it comes to such a job, your personal hourly rate doesn't come into play. So you work with the factors provided - words versus budget. In this case the client is asking that the contractor writes 100 words for each dollar. That's the only way he/she will accommodate you in his/her budget: (17000/170). 

 

ilan, that's the way it works. I'm in your field, so I'm certain about this. And if you ask me, that's a good rate, especially as you say you are new to Upwork. 

 

Craig wrote:

 i think that is the whole point of this post. To complete this project at the fixed rate supplied would mean an hourly rate of $1 per hour. 

 
The way I understand it, ilan wants to be able to assess if the job offer is reasonable or not. He can write the book in a day if he chooses to, or he can utilize the duration allowed. So if you convert the choices into an hourly rate, you are bound to get varying rates. 
 
When a client chooses to go the fixed job way, he doesn't care if you have a team on your end to help you do a fortnight's job in a day, 2days, any. As long as the job gets done well, that's all that matters. So, we cannot say with certainty that someone cannot write more than 2,500 words in a day. That flexibility is what makes many writers request clients to convert hourly jobs that they have won into fixed rate jobs. 

 

 

 

ilanherman
Active Member
ilan h Member Since: Mar 22, 2016
15 of 24

hey mercy

 

maybe 2-3 dollars an hour is a good rate where u live but here in Ca that rate is obscenely low and expolitative. r u being argumantative just for the sake ot it, or do u live in a cave and eat weeds and roots? and your point about having a 'team' to help copmlete the task is absurd and would lower the hourly rate even more. in conclusion, no, it's not a fair rate, not even close, and if this is the standard set by upwork than i'll be much happier in the 'real world' where someone is appreciated and fairly rewarded for their craft. 

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
16 of 24

@ilan h wrote:

hey mercy

 

maybe 2-3 dollars an hour is a good rate where u live but here in Ca that rate is obscenely low and expolitative. r u being argumantative just for the sake ot it, or do u live in a cave and eat weeds and roots? and your point about having a 'team' to help copmlete the task is absurd and would lower the hourly rate even more. in conclusion, no, it's not a fair rate, not even close, and if this is the standard set by upwork than i'll be much happier in the 'real world' where someone is appreciated and fairly rewarded for their craft. 


Bro, I compete with them all the time. They ain't even ready for this jelly.

 

95% of bidders aren't qualified at all. They can hardly speak English. I figure with 100 bids that I have 5 competitors, and you have an advantage if you are in the customers's country. It can be done. I pillage jobs all the time from the lowballers. It's an acquired skill, but you have to know what to look for in job posts. 

hfspeegle
Community Guru
Heath S Member Since: Mar 16, 2016
17 of 24

@Jennifer M wrote:

Bro, I compete with them all the time. They ain't even ready for this jelly.

95% of bidders aren't qualified at all. They can hardly speak English. I figure with 100 bids that I have 5 competitors, and you have an advantage if you are in the customers's country. It can be done. I pillage jobs all the time from the lowballers. It's an acquired skill, but you have to know what to look for in job posts. 


I'm going to jump in on this thread because 1. I haven't ranted about anything in almost 24 hours and 2. I love the way Jennifer talks (types).  Please keep in mind I'm only talking about writing jobs here, not tech jobs.

 

So I've been working on acquiring the same skill that Jennifer has mastered - pillaging good jobs from lowballers.  If I think the client really wants quality (expert level, reasonable budget, etc.) then I submit a proposal with a reasonable rate, not slave wages.  About 90% of the jobs I apply to have something like "NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKERS ONLY" or "MUST BE IN THE US, CANADA, UK, AUSTRALIA, OR NEW ZEALAND."

 

What burns me is when I still see bids from places like the Phillipines, India, Pakistan, Egypt, Nigeria, and Kenya at $3-6/hour.  Is it possible that those freelancers write in English at a native level?  Absolutely!  Maybe they studied super hard in school, maybe they grew up in an anglophone country, perhaps one of their parents was a native English speaker.

 

But when that freelancer's profile says "I editor for long time of prestigus publicashuns and I do best job for you. My clients are important for success of us" then I know they're just wasting the client's time.  So how does that hurt me?  Because they bring down the average bid rate.  A good client will see that the freelancer speaks English like I speak high school Spanish, but they might look at the bid rates and hesitate to choose me because my rate is above the average.  So, tell you what, you don't pretend to speak native English, and I won't pretend to speak Hindi, or be a graphic designer, or a developer, or a database wiz, or a male model (although my profile picture kind of strikes that option).

ilanherman
Active Member
ilan h Member Since: Mar 22, 2016
18 of 24

funny how it feels to be on the other end. Picture a steel worker in Detroit, or a miner in Appalachia, how one day their jobs were gone for the sake of a global economy. The competition wasn't as good but it was a lot cheaper.   

tlbp
Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
19 of 24

I think you will be much happier in your "real" world. Someone who is offering $1 per 100 words, expects $1 per 100 words quality. There are other clients who pay more, and there are clients who pay an hourly rate. Though if you are only able to produce 2500 words in 8 hours, I doubt you'll find many willing to pay you $25 an hour. 

 

If you believe you have the skills to merit the pay, prove it and ask for the pay. 

 

Oops, only 6 hours a day. 

 

ilanherman
Active Member
ilan h Member Since: Mar 22, 2016
20 of 24

'I am able to understand and condense large amounts of information quickly.'

 

the above sentence is from your profile. that's a shaky sentence because of where u place the word 'quickly.'

 

the sentence should read : I am able to quickly understand and condense large amounts of information. 

 

see how much better that sounds? maybe it's those kind of missed details that allow you to write so quickly. lol. or maybe you just can't tell the difference. 

 

go ahead, fix it, it's on the house. 

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