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Can people *buy* profile approvals?!

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
21 of 30

@Alexander N wrote:

Why not allow membership in every field as long as freelancer is Premium and pays monthly fee? Then total time wasters won't be there.

 


 Because clients get innundated by endless proposals and with 80% of all newbies in many categories never winning a single contracts there is 0 point allowing more just to make more noise and bury more clients in masses of useless proposals...

 

Community Guru
Alexander N Member Since: Dec 28, 2008
22 of 30

But well Petra, endless row of time wasters won't pay a $20 monthly fee.

 

While i agree with your view of the problem in general. Like in every crowd-anything platform, say Uber, there is a problem of desperate people who don't realise they can't succeed. No one invented a surefire solution to that problem. Nothing short of extensive system of prequalification (essentially ensuring that only people who will get in are those who are already successful offline or elsewhere - not create a business on Upwork, but present your already provably successful business there) is likely to ever fix it.

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
23 of 30

@Petra R wrote:

@Alexander N wrote:

Why not allow membership in every field as long as freelancer is Premium and pays monthly fee? Then total time wasters won't be there.

 


 Because clients get innundated by endless proposals and with 80% of all newbies in many categories never winning a single contracts there is 0 point allowing more just to make more noise and bury more clients in masses of useless proposals...

 


A googolplex kudos to this. Oversaturating an already saturated market is not a solution to any problem.

 

But still remains the question of the possibly corrupt Upwork agent. Managment really need to look into this, I say...

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Ace Contributor
Fatima A Member Since: Sep 26, 2013
24 of 30

@Rene K wrote:

@Petra R wrote:

@Alexander N wrote:

Why not allow membership in every field as long as freelancer is Premium and pays monthly fee? Then total time wasters won't be there.

 


 Because clients get innundated by endless proposals and with 80% of all newbies in many categories never winning a single contracts there is 0 point allowing more just to make more noise and bury more clients in masses of useless proposals...

 


A googolplex kudos to this. Oversaturating an already saturated market is not a solution to any problem.

 

But still remains the question of the possibly corrupt Upwork agent. Managment really need to look into this, I say...


I don't see a strong case for the idea that spammers would pay $20 per month to send bids with no response. But there have to be multiple strategies to manage saturation. Some that I have seen are markets that make your profile private if you can't win a single project in the first 1-3 months after joining. Another could be the rate at which your proposals are opened. That's a good way to gauge quality, because obvious timewasters generally don't bother crafting proposals worth reading.

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
25 of 30

If qualified freelancers are being turned away because someone who monitors new accounts on Upwork, is being paid to pass profiles that are not suitable, then Upwork needs to do something about it. 

 

 

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
26 of 30

@Fatima A wrote:


A googolplex kudos to this. Oversaturating an already saturated market is not a solution to any problem.

 

But still remains the question of the possibly corrupt Upwork agent. Managment really need to look into this, I say...


I don't see a strong case for the idea that spammers would pay $20 per month to send bids with no response.


 Spammers may not - but people desperate enough would and already do. It's $ 10 a month by the way.

 

People pay some self proclaimed guru hundreds or thousands to be taught how to earn money on Upwork and still don't (make even their "course fee" back.) $ 10 a month is nothing.

 

If a category is oversubscribed, and most entry level ones are, there is NO point admitting more. None.

 

Clients already get too many proposals (in the categories where people are being turned down) - anything that turns off clients is a bad idea.

 

Ace Contributor
Fatima A Member Since: Sep 26, 2013
27 of 30

@Alexander N wrote:

I think motivation behind it is that ARPU of Upwork suffers if there are too many people on it who aren't making any money. It also hits image - 'several million people out there and only a few thousands make a first-world salary, and a few tens of thousands a third-world salary, others just wasting time'. Naturally Upwork wants to limit numbers of 'dead souls'.

 

Why not allow membership in every field as long as freelancer is Premium and pays monthly fee? Then total time wasters won't be there.

 

Or better yet, just make EVERYONE pay. If you can't pay $20 a month to stay on the platform, especially knowing that clutter will decrease severalfold so getting jobs will be easier, you are doing something wrong and probably shouldn't be there. That would be a no-go for a new site as it has shortage of talent even without fees, but Upwork is the world giant.


When I got started on Upwork, back in 2013, I was a nearly homeless kid living with no bank balance, no degree, nothing but what I could offer clients here. Upwork opened a lot of doors for me, first to survive on my own and second to suceed in the fields of my choice. It hasn't all been smooth sailing but it's been one of the best and most important career decisions I've ever made, teaching me more about what it takes to be a good professional and engage with people from all over the world than any school could have as well as opening entire career tracks for me to this day. I can understand a scenario where a talented person might not have the means to make online payments (even assuming they have the money). I am profoundly grateful I went through what I did at a time when I had this unexpected opportunity available, and it's not a ladder I'd like to pull up after me.

 

I do support the idea of premium members being approved for their categories as an additional option, not the only option, although Upwork would still have to answer for quality and figure out what do if someone cancels membership afterwards.

Community Guru
Alexander N Member Since: Dec 28, 2008
28 of 30

Yeah i am getting your frustration people... I feel frustrated as well... Fixing it is a same thing as fixing people being stupid - which ain't gonna happen.

 

Markets aren't oversaturated because of some Upwork's flaws or sins. They are saturated because people are too stubborn and fanatical, many of them desperate for money, and don't think what they are doing.

 

Just take the field of SEO. It is truly pathetic. What all these people are really doing, or supposed to do? SEO is nearly not working any more, but crowds and crowds of people keep offering it, wasting time capturing the few final clueless clients.

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
29 of 30

@Alexander N wrote:

 

Markets aren't oversaturated because of some Upwork's flaws or sins. They are saturated because people are too stubborn and fanatical, many of them desperate for money, and don't think what they are doing.


That's a significant factor, but if you look at things from a historical perspective, many freelancers who were approved prior to Upwork implementing the policy of rejecting applicants for saturated markets are objectively less qualified than the new applicants being rejected, and that's tough to accept if you're rejected. If you doubt this, do a broad freelancer search in any of the saturated markets, and you will find a great many freelancers who have earned little or no money.

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
Alexander N Member Since: Dec 28, 2008
30 of 30

And that's fair. If i bought an apartment in now-hot area 20 years ago, i am rightly enjoying the value i am getting on it. What's wrong with it?

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