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Client unresponsive after receiving the complete work

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
11 of 22

This at least is a positive attitude. Now spend some time reading all the help section, enjoy the videos and ask questions here if something remains unclear.

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
12 of 22

@Abdulmoti S wrote:

Sometimes when you are NEW, you rush into things, but mistakes has to be made, in order to learn, yeah?

 

No one gets it right from get go.. I find disappointments or mistakes an opportunity to learn, it becomes a problem when you do not learn from them and keep repeating them. Smiley Happy


 yeah but like... they TELL YOU in an email lol It says not to start until verification. You think they were lying or something? lol

Community Leader
Abdulmoti S Member Since: Jan 12, 2017
13 of 22

Smiley Happy Like I said, as a new to the place, sometimes one rushes to accept the offer and also I haven't seen email telling me to not start until varification is done, maybe that applies on fix budget jobs. Anyways lessons learned, and we go forward. Besides the client might have a good reason not to communicate and give feedback on the work done, who knows, either way, not great harm is done.

Ace Contributor
Yoshua Yasmin S Member Since: Nov 9, 2016
14 of 22

This happened to me a few times - my client went missing after I submitted my work within the required time frame, making sure it met the deadline given by them.

 

However, like what others said, this doesn't simply mean that they won't pay you. The client that went missing came back a few days later and said she got so busy in life, apologised, and immediately took care of the payment.

 

In your case it's riskier because his/her payment method is unverified. I would suggest to simply follow what Preston shared in the future - make sure to tell your clients to make their payment method verified before you agree to take any work with them. I do this all the time too.

 

Sometimes, an unverified payment method should not make you back away from a potential job at all. Pay attention to other details too such as their joining date or their work history (if they have hired people before chances are they went inactive for too long, changed card - if they used one to make payments - or any other reasons that I don't know as well that made their payment method become unverified).

 

I'm curious - I've heard that sometimes contracts get suspended when a client's payment method becomes unverified. Did you get any notification that an investigation on your said contract was happening and as a result, the contract was suspended?


Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
15 of 22
> Yoshua S wrote:

> This happened to me a few times

 

Seriously? Few times? This happens once and then you learn your lesson. 

 

 

> Sometimes, an unverified payment method should not make you back away from a potential job at all.

 

Oh, OK, I get it. You are doing this wrong.

Unverified payment method means you don't start the job until the payment method is verified. And the escrow funded if it's fixed price. Period.

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Ace Contributor
Yoshua Yasmin S Member Since: Nov 9, 2016
16 of 22

What happened to me a few times was the client went missing with a fixed contract already started, funds from his/her side deposited in Escrow. 

 

Now it's hardly my fault that the client went AWOL because he/she got a sudden business. As simple as that. LOL.

 

As for the unverified payment method thingy, to each their own I guess. I have worked with clients with unverified payment methods, and by going with what I said before, all turned out fine.

 

And I don't think I said I ever started a contract with this kind of client. All I was saying was simply that an unverified payment method alone was not a guarantee that a client would end up being classified as "bad",

 

Definitely not my business if anyone simply does not want to do anything with it. 

Community Leader
Abdulmoti S Member Since: Jan 12, 2017
17 of 22

I got that notification for another excellent client and it was you said and the case was resolved, but not this one, It is very possible the case could be as you said, the client got busy with something, I am not saying it is definetly a problem, was just wondering why the silence (even though the deadline was tight and i submitted the work, i thought feedback was in order) and the unverified thing, but you guys have given me plenty of good advises. I am ought to give my client the benefit of doubt as well specially when the client has history of hires and spendings. Maybe because I am new I am curious and questions are running in my head. Either way I still learn a lot and there is no loss to mention here. Thank you all big time.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
18 of 22

What do you mean by giving them the benefit of the doubt? I figure I do that while waiting for them to do what they need to do instead of just rejecting their offer. I don't understand how giving them the benefit of the doubt means you have to work without payment verification? They just need to verify the card and escrow... that's what they got to do. There is no benefit of the doubt if they just do it.

 

I tell people to sod off every week. Gonna have to learn that skill or get scammed some more. Had some off-platform person contact me and wanted to do the 50/50 deposit thing and pay me after the draft. It was $255 so not a lot of money. Told her I don't do that. I only work with money on the table. She said it's about trust. I told her yeah I trust you when you pay me and then I do the work. Try getting product from Amazon with 50% payment...**Edited for Community Guidelines**. She backed out. Bye, **Edited for Community Guidelines**.

Community Leader
Abdulmoti S Member Since: Jan 12, 2017
19 of 22

By benefit of doubt, I meant in the particular case I was talking about and not in general, you can also be firm with a bit humility and in very nice way, you can't tell clients or otherwise, get lost and talk to them doubtful way, they offer something, you don't like it, you counter-offer they don't like it, then we part our ways and who knows the client might reflect on your offer and find it fair and comes back. You are right most of what you are saying, it is difficult to deal with someone behind a screen and it is the same for the client too, so it goes both ways, then we just have to set rules of engagement and if both sides are fine with it amazing, if not, life goes on. You get what I mean?

 

Sometimes we learn things in the hard way and it is fine with me, and sure I always try to limit learning the hardway Smiley Happy

 

Thanks for your advise, I appreciate it.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
20 of 22

@Abdulmoti S wrote:

You get what I mean?

 

 


 not really

 

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