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Estimated Duration

Active Member
Ryan D Member Since: Feb 18, 2017
1 of 9

All,

 

I have no idea what Upwork means when it asks for the Estimated Duration. 

 

Do they mean how long one is available to work with a company? Or how long the task will take? And do clients understand the meaning of this?

 

In my perspective, the estimated duration is impossible to answer. Number 1, if a client is good and continues to have work it'll likely be a long term opportunity but that won't be known until after you engage with them. Number 2, until you get detailed information on a specific task you'll likely have no idea how long it will take to complete especially when most clients don't give a detailed description of the project. 

 

Please help... 

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
2 of 9

Speaking only for myself, I always assumed estimated duration to mean how long you expect a task to take. So, if you're applying for an on-going job, I don't think it's too relevant. If there's a client reading this, maybe she can tell us if clients even see the estimated duration, let alone understand it.

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Active Member
Ryan D Member Since: Feb 18, 2017
3 of 9

Thanks for getting back to me. Very interested in hearing some other feedback on this. 

Active Member
Ryan D Member Since: Feb 18, 2017
4 of 9

All,

 

I have no idea what Upwork means when it asks for the Estimated Duration. I'm curious to see how the Upwork community understands this. 

 

Does it mean how long one is available to work with a company? Or how long the task will take? And do clients understand the meaning of this?

 

Also curious if clients see this on thier end. 

 

In my perspective, the estimated duration is impossible to answer. Number 1, if a client is good and continues to have work it'll likely be a long term opportunity but that won't be known until after you engage with them. Number 2, until you get detailed information on a specific task you'll likely have no idea how long it will take to complete especially when most clients don't give a detailed description of the project. 

 

Please help... 

Community Guru
Gerry S Member Since: Nov 23, 2014
5 of 9

You need to start "somewhere".

 

You also need to ask yourself why you are applying for jobs where you cannot even "guess" at some number.

 

Plus or minus 50% is typical for an initial "guess".

 

You ALWAYS suggest an "estimating phase" when there is the least doubt.

 

I always manage to turn fixed jobs into manual hourly jobs with no complaints. If you can't convince the client, you don't know your job.

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
6 of 9

@Gerry S wrote:

You need to start "somewhere".

 

You also need to ask yourself why you are applying for jobs where you cannot even "guess" at some number.

 

Plus or minus 50% is typical for an initial "guess".

 

You ALWAYS suggest an "estimating phase" when there is the least doubt.

 

I always manage to turn fixed jobs into manual hourly jobs with no complaints. If you can't convince the client, you don't know your job.


 That depends entirely on the nature of the work and the scope of the posting. 

 

For example, many attorneys post something like "need some content for my website". Now, aside from the fact that "come content" may mean three pages or 100 pages (both actual examples), if the content includes blog posts, the job may be ongoing over several months or even years.

 

I'm curious, though, about why you "manage" to convert fixed price jobs into hourly, since my goal is always the opposite.

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
7 of 9

This field on the proposal page is totally useless. Maybe clients cant see it, maybe they can't but it doesn't matter because as it is right now, it serves no purpose.

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Community Guru
Virginia F Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
8 of 9

@Ryan D wrote:

Thanks for getting back to me. Very interested in hearing some other feedback on this. 


You're overthinking this Ryan. An experienced freelancer knows how to address time management and milestones and the variables that can occur with a client and during a job. You learn to include verbiage in your bids that should cover most issues related to deadlines, client expectations, and a reasonable estimation of your time.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
9 of 9

For me most of my stuff is short so I say a week and then give them a real estimate in chat. Come to think of it I've probably said a week but then gave them a longer deadline if I'm busy. Not sure though. I go off of whatever I tell them when I give them the deadline.

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