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How to propose a job when est, budget is extremely low, has $$$ and is multiple hours?

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Active Member
Kim C Member Since: May 23, 2017
1 of 8

Hi there, I'm new to the platform.  I have 25+ years of experience working in large scale advertising agencies as well as startups.  I've completed my profile, uploaded several work samples.  

I could use your support in understanding how to submit a proposal when the client has set their est. budget at an extremely low rate (say $75) asks for $$$ level and the job is multiple hours says 15-30.  

I'm not sure how to respond or how to interpret the est. budget.  PLease fill me in.

 

Thank you SO much for your ilumination. : )

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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
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don't you have set rates since you are experience? I don't understand why budget matters.

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Kim C Member Since: May 23, 2017
3 of 8

Hi there, thanks for your response. I do have set rates, I've reduced my rate, for am initial period, as an introduction to this platform.  My question is from an understanding of how this platform/community operates.  I'm not sure how much weight I need to give the client est. budget in consideration of my proposal.  

 

Ex: If I prospose higher than an est. budget will my proposal automatically be eliminated? 

 

Wanting to understand the platform so that I can be effective with my time and energy.

 

Again, thank you so much for your time and experience.

 

 

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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
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No, your bid isn't hidden if you go over their budget. They can still see it.

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Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
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Kim, there are three types of clients who post disproportionately low budgets: those who can't or won't pay reasonable rates, those who have no idea what the project should cost, and those who are hoping for bargain basement rates but may change their minds when they see the range of proposals and quality difference.

 

Telling them apart takes some experience, but one place to look is at what they've paid for past work. I don't pay any attention to the 'average hourly rate,' since that aggregates work of all types. But, scrolling down to the bottom of the proposal to look at specific past jobs will give you an idea as to whether the client is willing to pay reasonable rates. 

 

As far as the "how to," I just ignore the posted budget and change the number to what I think is reasonable and don't mention their proposed budget at all. The prospective client can take it or leave it.

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Kim C Member Since: May 23, 2017
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@Tiffany S.  thank you for your reply.  This is very helpful.  Every platform has it's way that it works and the trick is figuring it out.  I truly apreciate your sharign your wisdom and experience.

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Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
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Always remember: most clients are more interested in value than in paying a particular price.

 

They will pay more if they believe doing so means getting good value.

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Active Member
Kim C Member Since: May 23, 2017
8 of 8

@Preston H, thanks for your response.  I figured that would be the case.  I approached my first several proposals this way but wasn't sure if they were being omitted or over looked becuase of the est. budget as a filter.