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Milestone is not what we agreed

rpruett13
Active Member
Rebecca P Member Since: Sep 18, 2017
1 of 9

Hello everyone!

 

I am new on Upwork and just finished my first job. The proposed offer that I accepted was to receive $15 for the first 2500 words submitted. The job description said I would be writing 500-1000 word articles daily. The first assignment requested was a 1000 word article which I completed and submitted via attaching a file in the message center. This morning I saw there was a milestone (I had not noticed this feature previously) and the terms we agreed upon were not the offer I accepted. The milestone says $5.00 for the first 2500 words. What am I missing? Did I get scammed? And what can I do? Thanks in advance! 

 

Rebecca

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
2 of 9

Whether you noticed it before or not, the milestone you are seeing is what you actually agreed to.

 

The client has a reasonable expectation that this is what you will do.

 

My advice is that you do exactly that.

 

If you not comfortable with that agreement, then make sure you talk with the client to clarify your expectations before agreeing to the next milestone.

 

If you feel that this client is not to be trusted, stop working for her.

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
3 of 9

re: "article which I completed and submitted via attaching a file in the message center."

 

We submit assignments using the green "Submit work / Request $" button.

 

That way we get paid automatically. There is no reason to submit using the messaging tool.

rpruett13
Active Member
Rebecca P Member Since: Sep 18, 2017
4 of 9

Thank you! I had not noticed the submit work button at the time. I did read back over the proposal and offer and see now what I missed. My question now is, if the milestone is 2500 words, and you've completed the first article of 1000, do you submit that article and request a partial amount of the milestone? 

katrinabeaver
Community Guru
Katrina B Member Since: Jan 9, 2011
5 of 9

@Rebecca P wrote:

Thank you! I had not noticed the submit work button at the time. I did read back over the proposal and offer and see now what I missed. My question now is, if the milestone is 2500 words, and you've completed the first article of 1000, do you submit that article and request a partial amount of the milestone? 


 No, if it were me I would ask the client for clarification since it's not what you agreed to. Never work on a milestone unless it is fully funded. 

"Fairness is giving all people the treatment they earn and deserve. It doesn't mean treating everyone alike-Coach John Wooden"
petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
6 of 9

@Rebecca P wrote:

. The proposed offer that I accepted was to receive $15 for the first 2500 words submitted.


 Sorry, you are setting yourself up for nightmare clients when you accept cheap <beep> jobs like that.... Not only are you working for clients who do not appreciate (or need, or want, or would recognize) quality, you are also telling any future client who looks at your profile exactly what value you put on your own work.

 

$ 15 fo 2500 words ( $ 0.006 per word) .... frankly it doesn't matter if it's $ 5 or $ 15, either is essentially "working for free!"

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
7 of 9

re: "My question now is, if the milestone is 2500 words, and you've completed the first article of 1000, do you submit that article and request a partial amount of the milestone?"

 

The situation is not IDEAL... But I can tell you from my own experience...

 

Sometimes I'm talking with a client and we agree via messaging to something to be done in a fixed-price contract or milestone, and we don't pay much attention to what is written down in the official contract. That isn't idea, but it happens and ends up with me submitting work that the client expects, and the client pays me for it.

 

Maybe that isn't the case at all this time. But that happens.

 

If WOULD NOT HURT to simply message the client, tell her what you have done thus far, and ask her if she wants you to submit it now in exchange for release of a portion of the funded escrow money... or if she wants to wait until a full 2500 words are completed...

rpruett13
Active Member
Rebecca P Member Since: Sep 18, 2017
8 of 9

Thank you so much for your insight! I was under the impression that people who were new to Upwork were supposed to take low paying jobs, even if they were just a few bucks, simply to get feedback and establish a reputation on the network. Being unfamiliar with the process certainly has it's disadvantages. When I found out that I was making basically $2 for a high-quality article, I have to admit I was a little annoyed with myself. 

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
9 of 9

re: "people who were new to Upwork were supposed to take low paying jobs, even if they were just a few bucks, simply to get feedback and establish a reputation on the network"

 

That is indeed one strategy that is used.

 

But there is no "rule" that says you are "supposed" to do this.

 

The idea behind this strategy is that it is REALLY, REALLY important to get on the playing field. And with ZERO work history, you are not on the playing field AT ALL. With zero jobs, it can be hard to get a job.

 

If you do FIXED-PRICE jobs... there is no hourly rate attached to them.

 

So that has an advantage over doing lower-paying hourly contracts, because you don't have a low hourly rate sitting in your work history. You may have a contract that you know worked out to a low hourly rate, but the clients who look at that can not see how long it took you to do the $15.00 job. Maybe it only took you a few minutes to do that.