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Nightmare Client, Endless Revisions

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Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
11 of 29

@Preston H wrote:

When I do a fixed-price project, I do the work, then I turn it in when it is done, and then the client pays me. That's it. There are no "revisions." 


That may be "it", but if the client wants revisions, is expecting revisions, and you don't provide revisions... I'm assuming that doesn't end that well with regards to feedback and client satisfaction? If you state, prior to hire, that no revisions are included, then that's great (I like your style!)... but if you don't, then you're setting yourself up for issues.

 

Different clients expect different things, so if revisions aren't discussed, it might become a sore point further down the line. 

 

 

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
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Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
12 of 29

To answer your question, Scott... I tell clients beforehand that they are welcome to pay for the work I do for them, or not pay.

 

They always pay. Because they don't want to risk not being able to ask me to do more work for them in the future. Not to be immodest or anything, but the work I do for clients is petty specialized and when they see it they really want it.

 

My "no revisions" policy does not work for everyone. The fixed-piece projects I work on are not subjective. A typical project I work on using a fixed-price contract is a data loader tool, to import an Excel spreadsheet into an optimized database.

 

Well... That either works or it doesn't work. And I'm the expert with regards to the whether the database is a high-quality, optimized database or not.

 

So it's not like the client can say she doesn't like the font or color or whatnot.

 

These aren't subjective projects, and I really know what I am doing with them, so I can be pretty strict with saying a project is done and it is time to pay.

 

Even so, if something doesn't work right, of course I fix it and make it work. I'm not mean about it. But I don't accept clients asking for new things that weren't part of the original agreement.

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Loraine Y Member Since: Jan 12, 2017
13 of 29

Yup, this is definitely a nightmare of my own making! It was the 2nd job I'd gotten on Upwork, and I was eager just to get it at the time. I've certainly learned my lesson well, though- won't ever be making the same mistake again, that's for sure! 

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Chris M Member Since: Jan 21, 2016
14 of 29

Hello all,

 

So far i had about 20 different clients in upwork. I always look at clients rating and feedbacks before i accept any job.

The problem is that 1/3 of my clients where problematic. Some of them asked for a lot more work than the one we agreed. Some others had very poor communication and delayed the payment.

 

My last client asked for several changes on a video that where not included in the agreement. She kept changing her mind and asking for new things several times. Some of the changes she wanted where impossible to make because the video was not filmed in front of a green screen(I explained this to her). I submited and resubmited 4 times, 4 different versions of the video she wanted. Every time I submited work she decided that she want to add something extra to the video. After my last submision(4th), she stopped communicating.

 

I am sick of these clients taking advantage of me and asking for extra work for small budgets. Only 2 of my previous clients payed a bonus for the extra work they requested.

 

How to deal with this kind of clients ???

 

In the fear of receiving a bad feedback/rating, I end up working 2-3 times more, for the same budget...

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Loraine Y Member Since: Jan 12, 2017
15 of 29

I feel you. I'm dealing with the same thing right now myself- what I thought would be a 4 hour job is now in it's 20th hour and there's still no end in sight. >_< I wish I had an answer for you, but I'm just here to add my sympathy. And to see what ideas anyone else might have.

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Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
16 of 29

Loraine: Tell your client:

 

"Cynthia, I really do appreciate the opportunity to work on this project. I think there was some misunderstanding about what a fixed-price contract would mean in this instance. A fixed-price contract is meant for doing the project once, without revisions or changes or requests unless specified in the original agreement. I would be happy to continue working on the project with you, but I can only continue to do so if you release the payment now and close the contract. Then, if you need any more changes or if it takes more work to finish, we can continue using an hourly contract which will allow for unlimited changes, revisions, new requests, etc."

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Shayla S Member Since: May 6, 2019
17 of 29

Preston, I like your style!   "It's done when I say it's done."

 

I will start using your approaching, as I am newbie who has just gotten my first dose of the client who has epiphanies through the night about what she wants to add.

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Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
18 of 29

Shayla S wrote:

Preston, I like your style!   "It's done when I say it's done."

 

I will start using your approaching, as I am newbie who has just gotten my first dose of the client who has epiphanies through the night about what she wants to add.


Shayla, as Preston himself pointed out, his approach is not applicable to creative fields. It works for him because his work is empirically right or wrong--there are no subjective preferences involved.

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Richard W Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
19 of 29

Shayla S wrote:

Preston, I like your style!   "It's done when I say it's done."

 

I will start using your approaching, as I am newbie who has just gotten my first dose of the client who has epiphanies through the night about what she wants to add.


This sounds like a very clear case of the client adding extra work. That's great, as long as the client understands (or is led to understand) that extra work requires an extra milestone or an hourly contract.

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Betsy M Member Since: Feb 27, 2020
20 of 29

Call out changes in your quote. "This quote includes 2 rounds of edits. Additonal rounds will be billed at $75 each."  Then explain to your clients why it is beneficial that they get all thier edits done in 2 rounds.