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jenproposals
Member

Profile rejection

I am absolutely flabbergasted that profiles are being rejected because there's TOO many people?

 

Are you kidding me?

 

I'm trying to direct friends and family to this site for freelance work -- THUS -- making Upwork a whole lot more money and they are being rejected.

 

Why is Upwork doing this? Yes, I saw the email as to 'why' -- but this makes absolutely no sense.

 

I've had friends invest money buying laptops and programs and training to prepare for this -- why even allow someone to start a profile if they are going to be rejected like this?

 

I've been using elance & odesk (Upwork) for years (like 15+ years) and it's going down hill so fast.

 

What gives?!!!

35 REPLIES 35
stencil_media
Member


@Jen H wrote:

 

making Upwork a whole lot more money

 


What makes you think that? Have you thought that through?

 

"why even allow someone to start a profile if they are going to be rejected like this?"

 

Because it's the content of the profile the person creates that determines whether they get accepted or not. If lots of buyers are looking for particle physicists, there aren't many particle physicists here, and you have three related doctorates and 40 years experience... then you're in the door. If you're a writer with three months experience of writing erotic fiction then it's less likely. 

 

I'm sorry, but I'm flabbergasted that people bought laptops, programs and conducted training for a site that they hadn't even been approved to work on yet. 

 

 

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)

Look -- I've been using these sites for years as a highly successful freelancer -- probably longer than you have.

 

Really, so people shouldn't come prepared in advance to starting to work? Really, that's your thought here?

 

And no, your reasoning makes no sense -- these are experienced U.S. workers that can bring in a lot more money to Upwork than lower-rate freelancers.

 

As for 'making Upwork a lot more money' -- can you not figure out how a HIGHER rate person would make Upwork more money?

 

Your response so passive-aggressive and absolutely not helpful at all.

@ Jen H. --

 

Check Scott's profile:  His hourly rate is exactly what yours is. (Asking rate, at least. Your job history shows that you often work for far less than your asking rate.) But Scott has earned roughly five times what you have earned on this platform, so it's probably fair to say that he knows his way around success on Upwork.

 

As to your friends:  Your expectation that they will earn [significant] money for themselves and Upwork is clearly predicated upon the assumption that they will readily find work at their own "HIGHER rate[s]" (as you put it). That is (and will and would be) just great, until and unless it turns out that they do NOT readily find work in their niches, because those fields are oversaturated, and/or because clients prefer to work with lower-cost freelancers, even if the lower-cost freelancers also turn out to be lower-skilled. (Alas for the clients... This is, however, a market in which clients are free to choose unwisely.) An analogy (there are many) is the assumption that a grocery store would be well-advised to stock its cookie shelves full-to-bursting with packages of luxury (high-priced) cookies, on the theory that these expensive cookies will surely make the store lots and lots of money. That would be true, of course, ONLY if a market (buyers) existed to support the purchase of all of the high-priced cookies.

 

I worked on other freelance sites before Upwork, was Upwork, so I know how it works -- I'm not looking for snarky responses here.

 

And the reason my rates fluctuates is because I offer a LOT of different services that don't involve the same rates -- I'm not going to charge $50/hour to copyedit or do DTP. I charge $50/hour for more technical work (like Proposal Management and Writing) -- so that argument is totally invalid.

 

Your analogy of the grocery store is ridiculous, because the rates that can be offered can change each time you submit a proposal, for a # of reasons -- it's highly unlikely in the grocery store scenario that the grocer is going to sell their product (which is the opposite of what the "BUYER OF UPWORK SERVICES IS DOING") based on different variables of said purchaser.

 


@Jen H wrote:

 

I worked on other freelance sites before Upwork, was Upwork, so I know how it works -- I'm not looking for snarky responses here.

 

As to my own responses, I did not offer "snark." I offered plain-spoken commentary. You may not have liked my observations, but they do not qualify as "snarky."  (I don't claim that I am above "snark." Just not guilty this time.)

 

And the reason my rates fluctuates is because I offer a LOT of different services that don't involve the same rates -- I'm not going to charge $50/hour to copyedit or do DTP. I charge $50/hour for more technical work (like Proposal Management and Writing) -- so that argument is totally invalid.

 

(1) I also provide copyediting services. I charge $42/hour for that. I cannot imagine why you would charge much less. Are you a really terrible copyeditor? (There: THAT is "snark.")

 

(2)  Before you label an "argument" as "invalid," it would be useful if you could actually identify what specific "argument" it is that you believe that you are so effectively refuting. I simply pointed out that you often charge less than your asking rate. What "argument" was I making that you so masterfully undermined with this riposte?

 

Your analogy of the grocery store is ridiculous, because the rates that can be offered can change each time you submit a proposal, for a # of reasons -- it's highly unlikely in the grocery store scenario that the grocer is going to sell their product (which is the opposite of what the "BUYER OF UPWORK SERVICES IS DOING") based on different variables of said purchaser.

 

This is incomprehensible rubbish. Cannot follow.

 


 

Really, that's where you are going with this -- not snark, insulting.

 

No i'm not a terrible copyeditor -- I copyedit every single day of my life on highly technical documents -- I just don't charge $42/hour for it because it's not as involved as the other work I provide -- so again, why are you trying to insult me when all I did was ask a question about Upwork's policy.

 

Forget it -- you guys are absolutely no help and quite insulting.

 

 

yitwail
Member


@Jen H wrote:

 

I've had friends invest money buying laptops and programs and training to prepare for this -- why even allow someone to start a profile if they are going to be rejected like this? 

 


The idea of someone training to prepare for Upwork freelancing is flabbergasting, not to mention buying laptops for the sake of joining Upwork. Aside from freelancers willing to do entry-level work at developing country rates, the only freelancers with a reasonable expectation of success at Upwork are those who can demonstrate proficiency in their field, through credentials, work experience, education, portfolio, and so forth, and evidently the people you perhaps encouraged to apply here don't fit the bill, and Upwork is probably doing them a favor by rejecting their profiles so they don't waste more time applying for work they're unlikely to get.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce

Excuse me, but an example of the "people" I am trying to bring to Upwork is:

 

Someone with 27 years experience and a Bachelors of Science in Pyschology and someone that is attending Georgetown University (pre-law) on scholarship and is currently interning for the DC Mayor's Office.

 

So, your assessment of the people I'm trying to bring to Upwork could not be more off-base.

 

Like I said -- Ive been on elance/odesk/upwork for 17 years, and have worked on projects for some of the largest companies in the world, so I think I know what it takes to be successful on Upwork.

 

So you think it's stupid for people to prepare to work for Upwork? in the way of testing, training in programs to be able to offer more services to client, to buying equipment to perform said jobs?  Really?

 

So when a new program or product comes out in whatever field of services you offer, you don't buy them, you don't train on them? I find that hard to believe.

 

Why do you people feel the need to insult me or my friends with your ridiculous comments.

 

 

slow down there, bullet

you're probably more angry than she is. Relax there are tons of places to freelance from. She'll figure it out. She has 45 years in psychology.


@Jen H wrote:

Excuse me, but an example of the "people" I am trying to bring to Upwork is:

 

Someone with 27 years experience and a Bachelors of Science in Pyschology and someone that is attending Georgetown University (pre-law) on scholarship and is currently interning for the DC Mayor's Office.

 


 Who can provide what services, exactly, that are in demand by Upwork clients?  (This is a serious question, not facetious at all.)

Internet research, Virtual Assistant, Data entry, Accounting, HR, Marketing, Political writing, Legal, etc.

 

so which of these services should my friends NOT be offering in order to be accepted.

 

 


@Jen H wrote:

Internet research, Virtual Assistant, Data entry, Accounting, HR, Marketing, Political writing, Legal, etc.

 

so which of these services should my friends NOT be offering in order to be accepted.

 

 


 Oversaturated fields:  Internet research, Virtual Assistant, Data entry

 

Not [yet] qualified if only "pre-law" (meaning, basically, just a random undergraduate) (in fact, it is illegal in all U.S. states and territories to advertise as offering, or to actually offer/perform, legal services until and unless one is admitted as a member of the bar!): Legal, etc.

 

I suspect that "HR" is also oversaturated and/or difficult to accomplish over the internet. This leaves us with "political writing" (plenty of other freelancers out there; not sure of saturation level or of demand) and the vague category of "marketing."

 

ETA:  Accounting might well be good, if your friends are well-qualified. Again, I don't know about market saturation or competing pricing from freelancers in developing countries.

Omg, those were just examples and I never said that my friend was offering to be a lawyer -- she has a strong legal and policital background in a variety of areas and has received awards from top legal and policital organizations and has paid internships supporting those types of organizations... so yeah, she could offer services related to the Legal services offered here (there's more to the 'law' than being a lawyer and no HR administration is not difficult to do over the internet -- why would it be offered as a service here then?

 

 

Hi Jen,

 

Upwork reviews freelancer registrations and if we find that our marketplace does not have opportunities for them based on their combination of skills and experience, their registration to Upwork will not be accepted. Although we allow freelancers to re-submit their profiles once if they feel they have more relevant skills or experience to add. We will take another look at this information upon resubmission.

We understand that this is disappointing to many freelancers that just registered, however, we want to make sure the freelancers we accept have the best chance at success on our platform. This requires us to not only closely review a freelancer’s talents and experience, but also balance with the availability of projects. For example, at times our marketplace may have too many freelancers with similar skills competing for a small number of projects.


Untitled


@Ryan C wrote:

Hi Jen,

 

Upwork reviews freelancer registrations and if we find that our marketplace does not have opportunities for them based on their combination of skills and experience, their registration to Upwork will not be accepted. Although we allow freelancers to re-submit their profiles once if they feel they have more relevant skills or experience to add. We will take another look at this information upon resubmission.

We understand that this is disappointing to many freelancers that just registered, however, we want to make sure the freelancers we accept have the best chance at success on our platform. This requires us to not only closely review a freelancer’s talents and experience, but also balance with the availability of projects. For example, at times our marketplace may have too many freelancers with similar skills competing for a small number of projects.


Just playing devil's advocate here Ryan.  How do you explain the many profiles that have been accepted by Upwork, but which should have been binned? I can think of (and pinpoint) one  very recent forum poster apparently holding one of the highest business aministration degrees you can get, but who hadn't the faintest idea what to do when instructed to follow a link.

Just sayin' . . .

Hi Nichola, 


We have also initiatives and programs for freelancers who have had difficulty being successful on the platform. Although I will not be able to share you the details of some programs, please know that these profiles are also addressed accordingly. 

 


~ Avery
Upwork


@Jen H wrote:

-- so which of these services should my friends NOT be offering in order to be accepted.

 

-- Omg, those were just examples

**************************

 

Sorry -- You can't have it both ways. You gave specific examples and asked "which of these [services]" your friends should not be offering to do as freelancers. When I responded with specifics, you exasperatedly indicate that you didn't actually intend for your question to be answered (and your tone clearly implies that anyone who took you seriously was foolish). If you offer examples that you seem to believe are strong support for your argument (in effect: "Knock THESE down, you smarty-pantses!"), then you cannot simply dismiss the counter-argument by claiming that the support you presented wasn't really serious in the first place. ("just examples..."  i.e., Not really my best stuff. Not the supporting arguments I COULD have made... The ones you would NOT have been able to knock down... The ones too strong and brilliant for you to overcome. If you weren't so foolish as to mistake these paltry examples for THE REAL THING--for the arguments I REALLY meant to make.)

 

 

and I never said that my friend was offering to be a lawyer -- she has a strong legal and policital background in a variety of areas and has received awards from top legal and policital organizations and has paid internships supporting those types of organizations... so yeah, she could offer services related to the Legal services offered here (there's more to the 'law' than being a lawyer and no HR administration is not difficult to do over the internet -- why would it be offered as a service here then?

 

"Unauthorized practice of law" does not make exceptions for undergraduate prodigies who have "strong legal and political background[s]." Check with our best LICENSED paralegals (several are regular Forum participants) who, themselves, are extremely careful to do only what they are legally allowed to do, and NO MORE.

 

As to HR -- fine, okay. It may well be a promising field here. I don't know.

 

 


 

Jen H, nobody is trying to insult you or your friends, but if you come onto the forum ready for a fight, you may get a little flack in return. None of us is responsible for what Upwork's algorithm decides. Many of us have been with Elance/oDesk/Upwork and many others for years, that has nothing to do with what Upwork might think of your recommendations!

 

If your friends are as well qualified and experienced as you say, then there should have been no problem in getting their profiles accepted. So something is out of whack. There are some categories that are oversubscribed, such as data entry, so profiles might well be turned down because of that. However, it is usually because the freelancer has not uploaded their pic, or satisfactorily completed Upwork's profile requirements.

I did not come here to FIGHT with the community -- I came here to complain about Upwork's policy -- and yes, I was insulted, as were my friends.

 

The idea that Upwork can't pinpoint the Offered Services that are over-saturated instead of blindly sending emails saying 'we have no use for your skills' and your profile is rejected is absolutely ridiculous.

 

I came here for guidance as to why this policy was instituted and why there is no guidance during profile development that would direct someone that those particular skills are not needed at this time, and when those services would be open.

 

 

 

 

 

 


@Jen H wrote:

I did not come here to FIGHT with the community -- I came here to complain about Upwork's policy -- and yes, I was insulted, as were my friends.

 

The idea that Upwork can't pinpoint the Offered Services that are over-saturated instead of blindly sending emails saying 'we have no use for your skills' and your profile is rejected is absolutely ridiculous.

 

I came here for guidance as to why this policy was instituted and why there is no guidance during profile development that would direct someone that those particular skills are not needed at this time, and when those services would be open.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Well, you need a mod to come in and answer this question, because we can't. We can only give an empirical view on similar complaints. We have seen thousands of freelancers wondering why their profiles are not accepted. Very often it is because a category is saturated, or a profile does not come up to standard for one reason or another. And I have to agree that there are some profiles that should never have been accepted and that are - so perhaps it is a quota thing.

This is sheer speculation on my part - I don't know.

So my complaint then is -- there should be some guidance both prior and after rejection as to what skills are over-saturated and not just sent emails saying ' we have no use for you'

 

How about when you select the type of work you're doing -- if the community is oversaturated, then Upwork should alert the person and explain why not to choose that.

 

I appreciate your reponse -- the only decent one in the bunch.


@Jen H wrote:

So my complaint then is -- there should be some guidance both prior and after rejection as to what skills are over-saturated and not just sent emails saying ' we have no use for you'

 

How about when you select the type of work you're doing -- if the community is oversaturated, then Upwork should alert the person and explain why not to choose that.

 

I appreciate your reponse -- the only decent one in the bunch.


 Is that what Upwork actually put: "We have no use for you"? Are you quite sure about that?

 

Hi Jen, 

I would just like to add to Ryan's reply that Upwork publishes a quarterly skills index that gives some insight into the fastest-growing freelance skills. Check out the latest one here.


~ Avery
Upwork


@Jen H wrote:

 

The idea that Upwork can't pinpoint the Offered Services that are over-saturated instead of blindly sending emails saying 'we have no use for your skills' and your profile is rejected is absolutely ridiculous.

 

I came here for guidance as to why this policy was instituted and why there is no guidance during profile development that would direct someone that those particular skills are not needed at this time, and when those services would be open.


 That's actually a very good idea, wish I'd thought of it myself. If you ask Upwork politely, perhaps they'll consider it (and I'm not being sarcastic). Earlier, you took exception to my remarks about your friends' qualifications. I was mainly questioning their expertise because by your original statement, some of them had to "train to prepare', and that sounded like they intended to start something new at Upwork, rather than whatever their original expertise might be. 

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
versailles
Member


@Jen H wrote:

I am absolutely flabbergasted that profiles are being rejected because there's TOO many people?

 


Guh?!?

 

This seems a most valid reason for rejecting additional applicants.

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless

I was pretty happy she used "flabbergasted" instead of "shocked." Those two words are a favorite with freelancers and we've seen "shocked" too many times. It was a nice change.

Glad I could be here for your amusement.

She said 'happy', she didn't say that it was funny or that it made here laugh. Sorry, but attention to detail is my thing. 

 

But anyway, if they gave a big list of skills that they didn't need, then people would just list a whole bunch of skills that they do need... whether they actually have those skills or not.

 

I am curious why this is such an issue for you, especially as this doesn't directly affect to you. I'm going to make some assumptions here, but there's a couple of likely issues...

 

1) You're extremely altruistic. I commend you.

 

2) You feel kind of bad recommended Upwork to these people in the first place. Maybe when you suggested, or they suggested, buying laptops, programs and conducting training... you agreed that it would be a good idea. Now that they've not been accepted, they're either blaming you, or you're blaming yourself. To save face, and/or diminish the feeling of guilt... you've decided to vent/complain/look for a solution. I guess that's understandable. 

 

But as the man says, they can resubmit their profile once, so maybe it would be a good idea to investigate the different categories, get a feel for which ones are oversaturated, revise profiles, add additional or more unique skills etc etc... and take it from there. 

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)

Many would-be freelancers have no marketable skill at all. 

They have a computer and know someone who made some money here.

 

It is a kindness on Upwork's part to reject their attempt to enter the jobs marketplace.

I am curious why this is such an issue for you, especially as this doesn't directly affect to you.

 

It would, of course, directly affect her if she was the one offering/selling the training, which was actually my first understanding of the original post.


@Kim F wrote:

I am curious why this is such an issue for you, especially as this doesn't directly affect to you.

 

It would, of course, directly affect her if she was the one offering/selling the training, which was actually my first understanding of the original post.


I've been reading this thread like a serial since last night and I never thought of that. Nice twist.




@Baris A wrote:

I've been reading this thread like a serial since last night and I never thought of that. Nice twist.


 Maybe mods can rename the thread; As The Upwork Turns? Cat Wink

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce

I am in as well, That's common problem for the new people who want to create profile in the upwork.

For example if someone bid too late in up work how skilled & qualified the freelancer is!

Chance to get that job around 10%.

 

Even I have tried to help my friend as well same issues we have too many freelancers if you have more relevant skills then add and resubmit your profile.

 

 


@Kim F wrote:

I am curious why this is such an issue for you, especially as this doesn't directly affect to you.

 

It would, of course, directly affect her if she was the one offering/selling the training, which was actually my first understanding of the original post.


 haha that was my guess too

old post but still relevant, 

 

i'm one part happy because there will be less concurency but another way, upwork forgot that the little freelancers , newbies was the ones who made upwork the great platform it is now.

not a super algorithm. So beginning to reject massively some area will not bring upwork very far. 

New platforms will benefit for those rejected ressources.

🙂