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Request payment afer how much time?

Ace Contributor
Estelle R Member Since: Feb 12, 2017
1 of 9

Hi,

I completed a translation last week, the client wanted it back on monday. I've sent him the file last sunday and told him that I'm available if something is wrong. Since then, no news from the client, didn't even see him connected. Shall I request payment or would that be rude? Or should I wait a bit longer? What do you usually do?

best regards,

Estelle

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
2 of 9

If you submitted to an escrow project using the submit button, the escrow auto-releases in 14 days.

 

If it's hourly and you tracked your time on Monday, it goes into review this week and then next week you get paid.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
3 of 9

@Estelle R wrote:

Hi,

I completed a translation last week, the client wanted it back on monday. I've sent him the file last sunday and told him that I'm available if something is wrong. Since then, no news from the client, didn't even see him connected. Shall I request payment or would that be rude? Or should I wait a bit longer? What do you usually do?

best regards,

Estelle


Estelle, on fixed rate contracts I actually send the file through the "submit work and request payment" function on the contract. That way the client has 14 days to request changes, or approve, or the funds are automatically released from Escrow.

 

you do have a funded contract with the full amount in Escrow, right? 

Ace Contributor
Estelle R Member Since: Feb 12, 2017
4 of 9

Hi guys,

Thanks for the answers. 

Petra, ys, it's a fixed price and funded, I just don't understand the point of not responding.

Actually you're right, next time I'll just request the payment from the beginning. 

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
5 of 9

re: "I just don't understand the point of not responding."

 

I think if freelancer is new, there might be more curiosity about this.

 

Personally, after having finished as many fixed-price contracts as I have, and having dealt with a variety of clients... I don't even think about it any more. Because the reasons don't make any difference to whether or not I get paid.

 

I always submit fixed-price contracts the same way: I use the official Submit/Request Payment button, and I never send any reminders or attempt to communicate further with the client.

 

Most of the time I get paid immediately or within a day or two. Sometimes I get paid automatically after 14 days.

 

I would rather get paid automatically after 14 days then spend time messaging back and forth with a client who wants changes.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
6 of 9

@Estelle R wrote:

Hi guys,

Thanks for the answers. 

Petra, ys, it's a fixed price and funded, I just don't understand the point of not responding.

Actually you're right, next time I'll just request the payment from the beginning. 


 It's pretty crappy of someone to let the timer run. You're gonna run into these types of people and then others will pay you right away. Upwork sends a reminder after 7 days I think, because lots of times I get the money on day 7.

 

Wait until you get the guy that lets the timer run down for 10 days or whatever and then sends you a revision request. only to then disappear when you send in revisions. You will feel the rage.

 

It's better to go hourly with these types. 

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
7 of 9

re: "Wait until you get the guy that lets the timer run down for 10 days or whatever and then sends you a revision request. only to then disappear when you send in revisions. You will feel the rage."

 

This is what some people have referred to as the "fixed-price loophole."

 

Regardless of what you call it, or whether you label it at all, this is a REAL possibility.

 

Effectively, the ability that a client has to request changes and thus prevent automatic payout of a fixed-price escrow payment means that a client has IMMENSE power over these types of contracts.

 

It is unethical and unprofessional for any client to use this capability to abuse the intent of this contract model, or to simply avoid payment. But it IS POSSIBLE for clients to do this, and some of them do.

 

Is there any recourse for freelancers within the Upwork user interface? No.

 

So what can freelancers do?

 

What I do is this: I use fixed-price contracts cautiously. And I start out small. No more than about $100 or a couple hours of work for my first fixed-price contract with any given client. That way, if the client turns out to be an abuser of the system, I can extricate myself without losing too much investment of time and effort.

 

I am simply not interested in trying to 'work things out" with a client who intentionally abuses the system, nor am I interested in appealing to Upwork in cases like this in which a client is "technically" abiding by all of Upwork's rules, but is really abusing those rules.

 

So I avoid getting in "too deep" with any client who might be like this, by starting out small and doing further work with fixed-price clients only after they demonstrate that they can be trusted.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
8 of 9

I have been in that loophole, and it's not fun at all.

Ace Contributor
Estelle R Member Since: Feb 12, 2017
9 of 9

"Wait until you get the guy that lets the timer run down for 10 days or whatever and then sends you a revision request. only to then disappear when you send in revisions. You will feel the rage."

 

Oh, I can imagine...Sounds like a nightmare. Those kind of issues shouldn't even exist. I requested payment, I'll see what happens, next time I'll go hourly...

 

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