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Unanswered proposals

Active Member
Roberto V Member Since: Feb 28, 2017
1 of 15

Hello,

Are the rejected proposal connects returned?

If so, there is a way to ask to the client to reject the proposal if he hire other freelancer?

 

It would be nice to set a time to the client to answer a proposal or reject it automatically to avoid freelancers to loose their connects.

 

Smiley Wink

Active Member
Ayman B Member Since: Feb 27, 2017
BEST ANSWER
2 of 15

Hello,

 

Sadly, the only way you get your 2 connects back after submitting a proposal is if the client cancels the job altogether without awarding it to anyone.
If the client hires someone, it doesn't automatically send you a notification telling you that your proposal has been declined. The client has to handle each proposal manually. When the client does reject your proposal, you receive a declination notification, but don't receive your connects back.

 

I thought about these matters for a while and suggested two things:

1) Possibility of receiving 1 out of 2 connects back for every declined proposal, so that for every 2 declined proposals you have a chance to submit another one, and

2) Receiving both of your connects back if the client neither hires someone nor cancels the job (there are many examples such as these in my proposal history list; jobs with 50 proposals and no activity for weeks, often for a job that was supposedly urgent).

 

I doubt they'll ever do something like 1) but 2) sounds quite reasonable, and I hope it's implemented, because inactivity amounts to cancellation for jobs with specific deadlines.

 

To conclude, I would say that it's perfectly harmless for your proposal not to be declined for a job that is awarded to someone else. In fact, clients might resort to checking out the proposal list a second time if their initial choice turns out to be a bad one, so it's either harmless or potentially beneficial.

Use your allotted connects wisely.

 

A.B.

Active Member
Roberto V Member Since: Feb 28, 2017
3 of 15

Thanks a lot for anwer.

That comment let everything clear.

 

Smiley Happy

 

Active Member
Juan V Member Since: Mar 18, 2015
4 of 15

I strongly believe they should make clients pay a fee every time they don't hire anyone for the job. Or at least every time they just vanished without answering any proposals. It seems like all the pressure (behavior, fees, etc) is on the contractor side...

Community Guru
Martina P Member Since: Jul 11, 2018
5 of 15

@Juan V wrote:

I strongly believe they should make clients pay a fee every time they don't hire anyone for the job. Or at least every time they just vanished without answering any proposals. It seems like all the pressure (behavior, fees, etc) is on the contractor side...


 This is the reality of a buyer's market. Currently, there are over 1,8 million freelancers (only counting active profiles) looking at 100K jobs. That is not a great ratio from the freelancer's perspective. 

Upwork needs to attract more clients, and will not make their activities on the platform more difficult. 

Active Member
Juan V Member Since: Mar 18, 2015
6 of 15

Yes, but it's still a mistake to think that the most important part of the marketplace are the clients, not the freelancers. The company should work to enhance both sides of the equation. Right now, if I'm looking to apply to a job, I have to take some time to write a customized cover letter for a job that (I don't really have statistics for this but I'm confident the numbers are probably worse than the stated here) 80% of the time won't even be opened again by the client who posted it. It's ridiculous!
At least, they should consider streamlining the application process. Let me apply for a job, and once the client answers back asking for more info, then ask me to write a cover letter, which takes time and for a freelancer, time is money.

Just my two cents.

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
7 of 15

@Juan V wrote:

Let me apply for a job, and once the client answers back asking for more info, then ask me to write a cover letter, which takes time


You can do that. You don't have to spend much time to write anything in order to apply. You can just put a simple sentence saying that you're interested in the job and wait for them to message you back before sending an elaborated proposal.

 

If that works for you, just do it.

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
8 of 15

@Juan V wrote:

Yes, but it's still a mistake to think that the most important part of the marketplace are the clients, not the freelancers


 Where does all (except minimal membership fees) the money come from? (The clients)

What does Upwork have WAY TOO MUCH of? (Freelancers)

Does it cost Upwork or the Marketpalce anything when freelancers leave? (No, as there are a dozen ++++  taking the place)

Does it cost Upwork or the Marketpalce anything when clients leave? (YES!)

 

So no. NOTHING that could make clients go elsewhere is a good idea.

Active Member
Juan V Member Since: Mar 18, 2015
9 of 15

@Petra R wrote:

@Juan V wrote:

Yes, but it's still a mistake to think that the most important part of the marketplace are the clients, not the freelancers


 Where does all (except minimal membership fees) the money come from? (The clients)

What does Upwork have WAY TOO MUCH of? (Freelancers)

Does it cost Upwork or the Marketpalce anything when freelancers leave? (No, as there are a dozen ++++  taking the place)

Does it cost Upwork or the Marketpalce anything when clients leave? (YES!)

 

So no. NOTHING that could make clients go elsewhere is a good idea.


So apart from the fact that your use of caps and symbols is annoying, your statements are all wrong or incorrect.

The money comes from the clients, true, but only because there are freelancers doing the jobs.

False, upwork doesn't have too many quality contractors. In fact, I'd say there is a shrotage of quality contractors.

If a contractor with a great profile leaves then I would say there is a cost for the platform. If a client that posts jobs and never goes through the applications leaves, then the cost is zero because that client is also not generating any money. So your statement is at least incorrect.

Community Leader
Michelle S Member Since: Jun 23, 2017
10 of 15

Freelancers whose skills are in high-demand have lower Upwork fees, can raise rates to cover fees, have repeat clients that hire them directly (no bidding) and can bid free on a lot of jobs since they are invited to bid.

 

All of these reasons increase the liklihood that freelancers who are doing well on Upwork will stay.

 

As a general rule, I don't apply to jobs that have more than 10 invites sent.  I don't bid on jobs with clients that hae many jobs open and a low hire rate.  I don't bid on jobs that have more than 20 people who have already applied. 

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