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Automatic Pass

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
11 of 24

@Reinier B wrote:

@Santosh K wrote:

Why Not Hired the perfect freelancer. 

 

By the way i am new here i like to start my 1st. Can anyone help me..???


Removing the below avarage test score from your profile would be an excellent start.


I beg to disagree. Let him be. He's a writter.

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
12 of 24

@Santosh K wrote:

Why Not Hired the perfect freelancer. 

 

By the way i am new here i like to start my 1st. Can anyone help me..???


 oh yeah you reminded me. Asks for perfect grammar or spelling. Not possible for anyone so they can diaf.

 

eta: haha VB guy capitalizing every word go figure

e_luneborg
Community Guru
Eve L Member Since: Feb 17, 2017
13 of 24

I agree with Reinier. Anything with Copyscape or "It will be checked by native speaker" puts me off.

 

I once had a client that made me change a five word sentence after he got a hit on Copyscape. The article was 2000 words in total, and that was the only hit he got, and he made it sound like I had just copied it from somewhere. After that he asked me to always check my work in Copyscape before submitting it. I didn't, but I did however end our contract. 

 

________________________
Freelancing is a gamble - To win you need skill, luck and a strategy
wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
14 of 24

Along with the above referenced 'copyscape' and 'you must/will' attitude, three "Must Pass" indicators are HIGH CONVERTING SALES (always in caps);  looooong copy for whatever arcane reason people think this actually works, and idjits who fail to include the actual theme of the copy.

 

That eliminates 2/3 of the writing gigs - and makes my life easy.

 

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
15 of 24

I'm trying to understand why people think 1000-1500 words is good for a landing page. Don't these people think for 2 seconds? I know it's because of "SEO" but jeez people nobody wants to read 1000 words on the services you sell. It usually ends up with some low priced "writer" starting off with a history of the industry (I don't know why they do this but they do), and then rambling on about nothing until you get to the last paragraph that actually says what they sell. Dumb.

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
16 of 24

Ego perhaps?  Whatever - it is STUPID.  Have they never heard of Sesame Street, texting, Twitter ... or a very limited attention span ?

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
17 of 24

Jennifer/Wendy: 

 

It's because there are roughly 12,368 blog posts showing them the graph where pages in the 2,000 word range rank best (with no consideration of other factors).

 

That said, most landing pages (at least, those designed by agencies who aren't operating in 1999) aren't 1,500+ words of straight text--they're basically a regular landing page with lots of white space, clear CTA, inviting buttons, etc in the top section of the page followed by much greater detail "below the fold" where visitors are free to ignore it if they're not interested in reading in depth.

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
18 of 24

Exactly, Tiffany.  I did a lot of work for a (direct client) Canadian Digital Marketing agency for a year or so ... and can not begin to tell you how b-o-r-i-n-g the formula writing became.  The pay was superb and immediate ... but, even then, it became too much and I found them their next writer.

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
19 of 24

@Wendy C wrote:

Exactly, Tiffany.  I did a lot of work for a (direct client) Canadian Digital Marketing agency for a year or so ... and can not begin to tell you how b-o-r-i-n-g the formula writing became.  The pay was superb and immediate ... but, even then, it became too much and I found them their next writer.


 I often grapple with that issue.

 

On the one hand, if they have a writer's style guide, then it *can* speed up my writing process (being excessively analytical, I measure every word from decades of poetry, academic, and songwriting).

 

On the flip side, it can inhibit my being in the writing flow. "Wait, what words do they prefer to use? Links? Internal? External? Mention the client's product or service? Don't mention it? Whhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaatttttttttttt?!?!"

 

For ::::bleeps::::: sake, I just want to get the ::::bleeping::::: words down. 

 

Then, there is a current client: here's a topic, write about it. Oh, wait, revise that and do this. "But muh keywords." Ok, what are they? "Oh no, we don't want writers engineering that." Ummmmm then how am I going to write what you want using the words that you want? "Just do what I say. I'm the Editor." 

 

I ended that contract LOL. 

 

It's also the reason I think I need a moratorium on 3rd party contracts. "My client wants X." Ok, here's X. Oh wait, they changed their mind.

 

No.

 

 

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
20 of 24

Kat, the digital agency gig reinforced my loathing for 3rd party contracts.  It took me back to agency days when the AEs were always trying to CY *subsitute "their" A.  For my own sanity and quality client results - my dictum became "I talk to the client".

 

Along a completely different train of thought -

 

Half the fun of freelancing is not being bored.  Writing about the same thing day in and day out is boring. Big time. If I don't find the subject matter of at least some interest - I'm not getting involved.

 

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