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Community Guru
Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
1 of 26

Hi all.

 

I was wondering if anyone had a book recommendation that they could share, because, much as I love them, I seem to be constantly reading either 'The House At Pooh Corner' or 'Catcher In The Rye'! New or old, it dosn't matter.

 

Any suggestions would be great.

 

 

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
2 of 26

A book I recently read, that I thought well written and full of information about what is (unfortunately) going on in the real world:

Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century 

It's written by an American journalist, Jessica Bruder. It one one of those rare books that made me wake up in the middle of the night to read some more.

Community Guru
Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
3 of 26

Luce N wrote:

A book I recently read, that I thought well written and full of information about what is (unfortunately) going on in the real world:

Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century 

It's written by an American journalist, Jessica Bruder. It one one of those rare books that made me wake up in the middle of the night to read some more.

 

Thank you Luce, that's now on the list!


 

Community Guru
Richard L Member Since: Dec 14, 2016
4 of 26

Can you give me an idea of what you enjoy? I tend to read at the literary fringe. Weird fact. I'm a freelance editor and I haven't read a physical book in 6 years. I have 5 books here in Spain (I had about 1000 in the US before I left). Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable by Beckett in Romanian (I tried to learn Romanian by trying to read it); La Machina de Follar by Buchowski (in Spanish, translates to the f-ing machine); Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges (Spanish short stories  by an Argentinian magical realism author); The Koran in Arabic (someone who rented a room from me left it here and didn't pay for the room); The Book of Not Knowing (actually in English. My daughter left it with me after her trip to visit me). I am finding it difficult to read in a second language. I read and edit about 100 books a year on the computer, so I am less not reading than doing it as a job via Siskel and Ebert. 

I could name probably all of the books on my shelves in my office before I left the US. I had a shelf dedicated to unusual people (e.g., biographies of Change and Eng, Sid and Nancy, Side Show Freaks, etc.), a shelf of poetry, a shelf of the best books, a shelf of the worst ones. Nothing was alphabetized but I could find anything immediately. I had a shelf that was mostly my own publications. When you publish books in English and they get translated into Chinese or whatever, they take up space. I gave my grandmother a Japanese version of one of my books because it wasn't worth her trying to read my book in English. She was 101 at the time and it gave her bragging rights at the home. It was dedicated to her (in English and various languages).

So...tell me what you like. Post a list of favorites. I'm sure I can share. One of my creative writing instructors said to me "Who is putting this stuff in your hands?" when referring to my reading list. I was resourceful.


Community Guru
Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
5 of 26

Richard L wrote:

Can you give me an idea of what you enjoy? I tend to read at the literary fringe. Weird fact. I'm a freelance editor and I haven't read a physical book in 6 years. I have 5 books here in Spain (I had about 1000 in the US before I left). Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable by Beckett in Romanian (I tried to learn Romanian by trying to read it); La Machina de Follar by Buchowski (in Spanish, translates to the f-ing machine); Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges (Spanish short stories  by an Argentinian magical realism author); The Koran in Arabic (someone who rented a room from me left it here and didn't pay for the room); The Book of Not Knowing (actually in English. My daughter left it with me after her trip to visit me). I am finding it difficult to read in a second language. I read and edit about 100 books a year on the computer, so I am less not reading than doing it as a job via Siskel and Ebert. 

I could name probably all of the books on my shelves in my office before I left the US. I had a shelf dedicated to unusual people (e.g., biographies of Change and Eng, Sid and Nancy, Side Show Freaks, etc.), a shelf of poetry, a shelf of the best books, a shelf of the worst ones. Nothing was alphabetized but I could find anything immediately. I had a shelf that was mostly my own publications. When you publish books in English and they get translated into Chinese or whatever, they take up space. I gave my grandmother a Japanese version of one of my books because it wasn't worth her trying to read my book in English. She was 101 at the time and it gave her bragging rights at the home. It was dedicated to her (in English and various languages).

So...tell me what you like. Post a list of favorites. I'm sure I can share. One of my creative writing instructors said to me "Who is putting this stuff in your hands?" when referring to my reading list. I was resourceful.


Hey Richard. Yep, that's exactly where I am...I read so much with work that I don't do it enough anymore for it's simple enjoyment....Well, apart from 'Pooh' and 'Catcher', I'm a fan of Cormac McCarthy and Dickens and as regards non fiction, 'Stalingrad' by Anthony Beevor is one of the best things I have ever read...Hopefully that may give you an indication about what I like, but I'm really open to anything.


 

Community Guru
Richard L Member Since: Dec 14, 2016
6 of 26

Beckett: Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable
Tom Kromer: Waiting for Nothing
Brautigan: So the Wind Won't Blow it All Away

Community Guru
Richard L Member Since: Dec 14, 2016
7 of 26

Jerzy Kozinsky: The Painted Bird

John Brunner: Stand on Zanzibar
D. Keith mano: The death and life of harry Goth or Take Five (a lot of his other books suck)

Community Guru
Michael S Member Since: Aug 29, 2017
8 of 26

If you're into cold-war era cloak & dagger stuff that leans toward technical thriller, snag a copy of Storming Intrepid by Payne Harrison. American space shuttle with parts for the "Star Wars" platform is hijacked by a Soviet operative, and it goes into great detail about how that happened, as well as all the surrounding events to get it back and prevent things from escalating into WW3.

 

Bit of a Hunt for Red October in space vibe, but really enjoyable. I've lost count of the number of times I've gone through it cover to cover.

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
9 of 26

The Midnight Folk by John Masefield (as an extension of  Pooh) - a true classic. The Kite Runner (which you have probably read),  as well as A Thousand Splendid Suns, and And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hossein, and if you are looking for a bit of enjoyable best-seller crime, the Cormoran Strike series by Robert Galbraith (AKA J.K. Rowlings)

 

And then, the standby classics of all the Brontes and Jane Austen etc.  If you like French writers: Balzac, Proust, Baudelaire, Gide, Camus, Sartre  and a thousand others ... 

Community Guru
Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
10 of 26

Nichola L wrote:

The Midnight Folk by John Masefield (as an extension of  Pooh) - a true classic. The Kite Runner (which you have probably read),  as well as A Thousand Splendid Suns, and And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hossein, and if you are looking for a bit of enjoyable best-seller crime, the Cormoran Strike series by Robert Galbraith (AKA J.K. Rowlings)

 

And then, the standby classics of all the Brontes and Jane Austen etc.  If you like French writers: Balzac, Proust, Baudelaire, Gide, Camus, Sartre  and a thousand others ... 

 

Thank you Nichola. Not sure why you thought I would have read The Kite Runner, but you're right, I have and loved it Smiley Happy I'll definitely look to get The Midnight Folk.


 

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