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Canadian French translators

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
21 of 33

@Luce N wrote:

@Reinier B wrote:

 

 Just Googled poutine. It looks really, really, disgusting, so I won't try it- even if I could get cheese curds.

 Poutine doesn't appeal to me, but do snails appeal to you, Reinier? What about insects or frogs?

 

We all have our preferences...



@Luce N wrote:

@Reinier B wrote:

 

 Just Googled poutine. It looks really, really, disgusting, so I won't try it- even if I could get cheese curds.

 Poutine doesn't appeal to me, but do snails appeal to you, Reinier? What about insects or frogs?

 

We all have our preferences...


The only time it's ever made any sense was when it was really cold (-20°C) and I'd had a lot of beer. It seems to work for two factors, alcohol absorption and increasing the protective fat level in your system. 

And if you want something translated into Quebec French, you really should hire a francophone Quebecker. I can't understand why you wouldn't do that since it's easy enough to find someone on the platform.  

Differences that you perceive as trivial or unimportant may not be when you accidentally  discover what they are.  It may depend on the type of document you're trying to translate but if you can get a regional specialist, why on earth would you take a chance?

I'll give you an example of an innocent mistake you could make with UK and US English. In UK English, when people say "pants" they mean the item of clothing the British call "trousers." If you say "pants" to a UK English speaker, from what I hear this means what a US speaker might call "underpants" or "undergarments." Even though it might not crop up in most applications, you don't know what the problem could be until you run into it.

And actually, I don't know what the problem with "pumps" would be. You could also say "a mile in her heels." Maybe you  just got an overly fastidious editor?

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
22 of 33

Wait till a Parisian translates I'm off to play with my kids by the school.

 

Then you'll see why knowledge of regional vocabulary matters.

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Community Guru
Kim F Member Since: Aug 26, 2015
23 of 33

I'll give you an example of an innocent mistake you could make with UK and US English...

 

It's often much more subtle. It's easy to learn alternative words and the different ways prepositions are used, but people run into trouble with calling the ground floor the first floor, and don't realise that in British English it would almost always be a mistake to call someone a "merchant banker". I'd always assumed similar issues to apply with different forms of French - with different forms of any language, really.

 

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
24 of 33

@Kim F wrote:

I'll give you an example of an innocent mistake you could make with UK and US English...


@You guys can go out and smoke a f@g (I had to use the @ instead of "a" because the message editor would **Bleep** it).

An American would be arrested for that.

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Community Guru
Kim F Member Since: Aug 26, 2015
25 of 33

@ Rene: > You guys can go out and smoke a f@g 

 

It's even better if you say it properly: 'Fancy a f@g?' 

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
26 of 33

@Kim F wrote:

@ Rene: > You guys can go out and smoke a f@g 

 

It's even better if you say it properly: 'Fancy a f@g?' 


As a chyron on _Laugh-In_ once advised:
For a fun evening, make a fruit cordial.

Community Guru
Renata S Member Since: Jun 10, 2014
27 of 33

@Luce N wrote:

Could you please tell me why Canadians tend to request Canadian French translations? What on earth is that? It makes me want to laugh because I can just imagine a text full of charming Canadian words such as "présentement", "niaiseux" and the such. 


Luce, I'm Canadian, but I'm not originally from Quebec. I'm a  conversational FSL speaker (and a imperfect one), so I'm not an expert commentator. (Take everything I say with a grain of salt and some cheese curds.) Petra's answer is along the right track. One part of it is that many terms used here originate from older French terms (French settlers first started arriving here in the 1600s). And some of the tech terms used here are different. The informal street lingo and idioms are a lot different.  The legal language is probably unique.  And, of couse, it's likely that some of the appropriate swear words might be completely lost on the average Parisian.  


Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
28 of 33

@Renata S wrote:


Luce, I'm Canadian, but I'm not originally from Quebec. I'm a  conversational FSL speaker (and a imperfect one), so I'm not an expert commentator. (Take everything I say with a grain of salt and some cheese curds.) Petra's answer is along the right track. One part of it is that many terms used here originate from older French terms (French settlers first started arriving here in the 1600s). And some of the tech terms used here are different. The informal street lingo and idioms are a lot different.  The legal language is probably unique.  And, of couse, it's likely that some of the appropriate swear words might be completely lost on the average Parisian.  



Of course I'm aware that there are differences between Canadian French and French French, but it sort of feels strange to know that I cannot apply to a English to French translation because I speak French and not Canadian French.

 

 

Before I noticed that on Upwork, I had never thought this could happen. It's a bit of a shock.

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
29 of 33

@Luce N wrote:


Of course I'm aware that there are differences between Canadian French and French French, but it sort of feels strange to know that I cannot apply to a English to French translation because I speak French and not Canadian French.

 

Before I noticed that on Upwork, I had never thought this could happen. It's a bit of a shock.


And the rest of us language professionals, translators or not, are baffled by your reaction to a perfectly rational business decision on the part of clients.

Also, nothing prevents you from applying to these jobs and making your case there. That advice has been repeated endlessly in the fora by our colleagues who have successfully won jobs despite not meeting very specifically stated client requirements. Your mileage may vary.

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
30 of 33

@Douglas Michael M wrote:

@Luce N wrote:


Of course I'm aware that there are differences between Canadian French and French French, but it sort of feels strange to know that I cannot apply to a English to French translation because I speak French and not Canadian French.

 

Before I noticed that on Upwork, I had never thought this could happen. It's a bit of a shock.


And the rest of us language professionals, translators or not, are baffled by your reaction to a perfectly rational business decision on the part of clients.

Also, nothing prevents you from applying to these jobs and making your case there. That advice has been repeated endlessly in the fora by our colleagues who have successfully won jobs despite not meeting very specifically stated client requirements. Your mileage may vary.


Please don't be baffled, I'm not stupid,  I perfectly understand the whole situation. It's just that I had never thought that French Canadians considered their language so different from French, and noting on Upwork that they made this difference was a total surprise. I thought that for a formal type of document, they would just think French French was proper enough.

 

Another thing is that many English to French translation offers request Canadian French - and I don't really think it would be worth applying for this type of offers. 

 

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