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Certification & portfolio recommendations

land_maya
Active Member
Maya L Member Since: Dec 21, 2016
1 of 11

Hello~~ I'm looking to create a more competetive translation profile.

 

1- Certification:

 

What certifications do you recommend for translation (Spanish=>English)?

Is it advisable to take a course before taking the ATA Certification Exam and if so, what course do you recommend?

 

2- Portfolio:

 

What type of documents would you recommend displaying in the portfolio if I have not done professional jobs yet?

 

 

Finally, in your experience, is Upwork a sustainable platform for translation work or do you recommend others?

 

Thank you! I greatly appreciate any feedback.

 

Best,

Maya

 

 

karmastore
Active Member
Jake G Member Since: Apr 10, 2017
BEST ANSWER
2 of 11

I can't really comment on your first question but as for the second. I had absolutely nothing to show in my portfolio before I registered on UpWork, I focused on applying for jobs specific to why I joined. I guess I got lucky with the niche because I seem to be receiving more offers than I send them out.

 

I have done lots of unrelated work outside of UpWork, I originally joined to build a decent, trusted portfolio. I have had nothing but good experiences but I am still very, very new to this site. The whole process/transaction is flawless in my opinion. I have done work prior to receiving any payment and I have always been paid.

 

When I do get some free time, I will for sure be putting most of it into UpWork. My top tips, don't just spam apply for jobs because you "can do it", apply for jobs you can slam out of the water. Stay away from copy and pasting in your applications and ANSWER THE QUESTIONS that are being asked by the potential client, keep it short and sweet. My number one tip, however, is to be active, apply for jobs that are freshly posted, get your application in first. If you see a posted job with tons of applicants and a handful of interviews move onto the next one, its not worth wasting your credits.

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colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
3 of 11

Maya,

 

You already have a great profile, but not much freelance experience, so I think you should certainly consider getting an ATA certification - Spanish>English>Spanish - which would give you the edge over the many translators with these language pairs on the site. For the moment, I would suggest you stick to your native/bilingual languages, but eventually, you could also offer Portuguese to English or Portuguese to Spanish.

 

For your portfolio - find  a few texts to translate (that are not copyrighted if you can't get permission from the original authors), or translate your own work.

land_maya
Active Member
Maya L Member Since: Dec 21, 2016
4 of 11

Thank you! This is very helpful Smiley Happy

danitiranti
Active Member
Daniela T Member Since: Feb 22, 2017
5 of 11

Did someone delete my post? My advice was great Smiley Sad

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
6 of 11

@Daniela T wrote:

Did someone delete my post? My advice was great Smiley Sad


That is very strange. Did your post actually show in the thread? I can't believe that you wrote anything that would have been disapproved of by a moderator.

danitiranti
Active Member
Daniela T Member Since: Feb 22, 2017
7 of 11

Yes, I actually saw it, and some minutes later it was gone.

 

Oh, well, here we go again:

 

Maya, if you haven't taken subjects on translation before, then yes, you should take a course before doing the ATA exam. I can't recommend any because my language pair is the reverse, but there are many to choose, and some courses are online about specific topics (this year I've attended an online course on the translation of clinical trial protocols, it was amazing). Have in mind that being a translator is a process. We should always try and improve Smiley Happy

 

Concerning your portfolio, volunteering is a great place to start. Cafebabel.es is an online publication where you can translate any article you want and it will be published on the site with your name and pic, so it's a great exposure, and of course, you can add it to your Upwork profile and it will look great. Another option is working for non-profits on websites like onlinevolunteering.org and trommons.org. This will give you the insight of working for a client, asking the right questions, and having an actual, scary deadline.

 

And about Upwork itself, I've only landed one job in threes months. I refuse to lower my rates, and you should do the same! So you should search work somewhere else, too, send your resume to agencies and direct clients that may be interested in your language pair.

 

Good luck!

land_maya
Active Member
Maya L Member Since: Dec 21, 2016
8 of 11

Thank you!

Cafebabel.es is a great recommendation.

land_maya
Active Member
Maya L Member Since: Dec 21, 2016
9 of 11

I'm also curious what your current rates are?

 

danitiranti
Active Member
Daniela T Member Since: Feb 22, 2017
10 of 11

@Maya L wrote:

I'm also curious what your current rates are?

 


 It depends on the topic of the text and rush of the client, but I charge between USD 0.08 and 0.12 per word.

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