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Editing scam?

Active Member
Troy M Member Since: Jul 18, 2019
1 of 12

I'm in the United States. I've hired people overseas to do editing. They have these great references yet, when it comes down to editing they set the cursor down on a document and they don't move hardly at all for 10 or 15 minutes is this something other people of experience? And is this simply a method of ripping people off? Or is it just customary that you have to read the whole entire document before you start editing it?

Ace Contributor
Robin H Member Since: May 28, 2019
2 of 12

Troy, if you hire experienced freelancers, why don't you trust them?  Are they not delivering by your deadline?  If they do deliver and you are satisfied with the results, why is this an issue?  Perhaps they open the document and need to get a glass of water before beginning.  Maybe the phone rings.  Maybe nature calls.  Whatever the case, have trust in your freelancer.  

Community Guru
Kim F Member Since: Aug 26, 2015
3 of 12

Troy M wrote:

I'm in the United States. I've hired people overseas to do editing. They have these great references yet, when it comes down to editing they set the cursor down on a document and they don't move hardly at all for 10 or 15 minutes is this something other people of experience? And is this simply a method of ripping people off? Or is it just customary that you have to read the whole entire document before you start editing it?


I'm not sure why being overseas is relevant, but I'm an overseas editor from your point of view.

 

What an odd question. Of course they have to read it first. Admittedly, if the document is over about 10k words I'll often edit errors that leap out while I'm doing the first read through, but I still need to have read the whole piece before I can really attack it. For example, you could have said the same thing three times and I'd need to spot that and decide where the best place for you to say that thing (and perhaps how) is. And I've been known to do few movements when considering some potential edits - or even looking something up to make certain it's correct. That's not ripping people off, it's doing a good job.

 

 

 

Ace Contributor
Wes C Member Since: May 3, 2019
4 of 12

Yes, it is common to read, or at least scan, through the document before beginning the real editing.  I do it to get an overall understanding of the work before I dive in.  It's also common to sit on a page for a few minutes to work out the best way to make a change or to Google names/places to validate spelling.   

 

Speed depends on a lot of factors - quality and complexity of the writing, how much needs to be validated for spelling / accuracy, etc.

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
5 of 12

Capture d’écran 2019-07-19 à 12.00.37.jpg

 

 

This measures the mouse/keyboard activity. If it's very low for 15 minutes, they are not doing much. I'm editing and I never stare at a screen for 10-15 minutes doing nothing.

 

 

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Community Guru
Kim F Member Since: Aug 26, 2015
6 of 12

Not doing much on screen.

 

Reading through, looking things up in books (because I haven't memorised all the style books I use, for starters), making notes on paper or on a separate screen to come back to... there are numerous reasons why people editing may not be going clickety-click all the time - especially at the start. That's without allowing time for thinking - I've never yet managed to edit a piece of fiction without having to at least once sit back for several minutes and try to work something out in my head.

 

But this is a good reminder why I avoid hourly-based projects.

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
7 of 12

Kim F wrote:

Not doing much on screen.

 

Reading through, looking things up in books (because I haven't memorised all the style books I use, for starters), making notes on paper or on a separate screen to come back to... there are numerous reasons why people editing may not be going clickety-click all the time - especially at the start. That's without allowing time for thinking - I've never yet managed to edit a piece of fiction without having to at least once sit back for several minutes and try to work something out in my head.

 

But this is a good reminder why I avoid hourly-based projects.


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Community Leader
Roberto S Member Since: Apr 27, 2019
8 of 12

Troy M wrote:

I'm in the United States. I've hired people overseas to do editing. They have these great references yet, when it comes down to editing they set the cursor down on a document and they don't move hardly at all for 10 or 15 minutes is this something other people of experience? And is this simply a method of ripping people off? Or is it just customary that you have to read the whole entire document before you start editing it?


It depends on many factors.
For example there was this time that I worked for 2 hours straight then I realized I was using the wrong contract to count the hours :facepalm: I didn't want to bother the client and I just left the counter going on for 2 hours (on the right contract this time), since I don't trust manual time requests.

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
9 of 12

Roberto S wrote:


For example there was this time that I worked for 2 hours straight then I realized I was using the wrong contract to count the hours :facepalm: I didn't want to bother the client and I just left the counter going on for 2 hours 

WAT?!

 

 

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Community Leader
Roberto S Member Since: Apr 27, 2019
10 of 12

Rene K wrote:

Roberto S wrote:


For example there was this time that I worked for 2 hours straight then I realized I was using the wrong contract to count the hours :facepalm: I didn't want to bother the client and I just left the counter going on for 2 hours 

WAT?!

 


I had 2 active contracts and it was my very first job on Upwork, I think, maybe the second one.
So i clicked "ON" to start counting the hours, but unluckily, after 2 hours, I realized I didn't select the right contract. So I deleted these 2 hours and I started counting them with the right contract this time, just that I idled for 2 hours more Smiley Indifferent Don't worry, I told the client my mistake before doing it.

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