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Grammar Apocalypse

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
51 of 121

@Reinier B wrote:

 

PS - Another silly paradox is the Twins Paradox, in which one twin that travels away from earth at the speed of light ages at a slower rate than the twin that remained on Earth. Time dilation? Really?      


I don't see what you don't like with this paradox. It accurately illustrates the fact that each of us experience their own time flow and that there is no universal clock that ticks at the same speed everywhere and for everyone.

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
reinierb
Community Guru
Reinier B Member Since: Nov 3, 2015
52 of 121

@Rene K wrote:

@Reinier B wrote:

 

PS - Another silly paradox is the Twins Paradox, in which one twin that travels away from earth at the speed of light ages at a slower rate than the twin that remained on Earth. Time dilation? Really?      


I don't see what you don't like with this paradox. It accurately illustrates the fact that each of us experience their own time flow and that there is no universal clock that ticks at the same speed everywhere and for everyone.


 I fully agree with you, but what I don't like is this- the Twins Paradox states that since time itself can pass at different rates, some parts of the Universe age at a slower rate than others- a notion that is based on nothing more than the fact that under some conditions, two identical clocks can run at different rates. 

 

 

 

 

duncanmeyer
Ace Contributor
Duncan M Member Since: Jan 30, 2017
53 of 121

Here are some of my "favorites":

 

that vs who
of vs off

to vs too
there vs their vs they're
the apostrophe for any word ending is "s"  (aaargh!)
the omission of the apostrophe for possession

the omission of the apostrophe to indicate dropped letters (Ive, couldnt)
Here is Aussie (and New Zealand) fewer vs less (drives me nuts!)

Generally speaking, people seem to have difficulty with homophones. But what really irks me is when people write phonetically - without actually understanding what it is they're writing. For example: "its just partin parcel of doing business", "The hage hold remedy", "bying large most people dont care" (Actual examples I've picked up from forums around the web)

 

Sigh...

Duncan

jmlaidlaw
Community Guru
Janean L Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
54 of 121

@Reinier B wrote:

 Perhaps this Zeno fellow did not know that nothing in the Universe is stationary? Or can never be stationary unless it is stopped by a force that exceeds its inertia? Or that even then, both objects (or their remains)will still be moving relative to everything else?

 ______________________________________

 

Actually, one of Zeno's Paradoxes of motion very much takes account of objects moving relative to each other. It is called either the Stadium Paradox or the Chariot[s] Paradox, depending upon which authority you reference. It has to do with two chariots (substitute Lego cars, if you like) that are passing both each other and a third, stationery chariot (Lego). A little complicated to explain without my trusty blackboard, but you can "prove" mathematically that, as Zeno ultimately puts it: "half the distance is equal to the whole."  (I used to also, and more easily, amaze students by mathematically proving that infinity equals zero. It's a very simple proof, actually.)

mwiggenhorn
Community Guru
Mary W Member Since: Nov 10, 2014
55 of 121

You people are making my poor little head hurt.  Bless your hearts.

yitwail
Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
56 of 121

@Mary W wrote:

You people are making my poor little head hurt.  Bless your hearts.


Speaking of blessings, let's ponder this instead:

 

One of Crete's own prophets has said it: 'Cretans are always liars, evil brutes, idle bellies'.
He has surely told the truth. — Epistle to Titus, 1:12–13

 

Spoiler
The Cretan "prophet" in question was Epimenides. If there's anyone from Crete reading this, my apology. Cat Embarassed

 

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
reinierb
Community Guru
Reinier B Member Since: Nov 3, 2015
57 of 121

@Janean L wrote:

@Reinier B wrote:

 Perhaps this Zeno fellow did not know that nothing in the Universe is stationary? Or can never be stationary unless it is stopped by a force that exceeds its inertia? Or that even then, both objects (or their remains)will still be moving relative to everything else?

 ______________________________________

 

Actually, one of Zeno's Paradoxes of motion very much takes account of objects moving relative to each other. It is called either the Stadium Paradox or the Chariot[s] Paradox, depending upon which authority you reference. It has to do with two chariots (substitute Lego cars, if you like) that are passing both each other and a third, stationery chariot (Lego). A little complicated to explain without my trusty blackboard, but you can "prove" mathematically that, as Zeno ultimately puts it: "half the distance is equal to the whole."  (I used to also, and more easily, amaze students by mathematically proving that infinity equals zero. It's a very simple proof, actually.)


 I have often wondered what message/"lesson" the authors/creators/inventors of paradoxes try to convey. For instance, Zeno says that "half the distance is equal to the whole", but this is simply not borne out by observation and some simple measurements. In fact, what does "half the distance is equal to the whole" even mean, and what is that statement's application in the real world?

 

As for "infinity equals zero", I suppose that anyone can "prove" anything with mathematics, depending on how it it spun, much like the way anything can be proven by spinning statistics. However, in the real world, infinity can never equal zero in any practical sense. If the two concepts could be made equal, the Universe coud either exist or it could not- but  the Universe does exist,so it can not also not exist.

 

I base this on the "infinite mass and density" of the Singularity that gave rise to the Universe, in the sense that "infinite" in this context can not be calculated. "Zero" on the other hand, can either have no value, or it can have a value of 10 (in the decimal system), depending on the context of the calculation. I often use this characteristic of zero to amuse the people who pay me to attend my lectures and talks, or to illustrate astronomical distances, concepts, and principles to them, but the fact is that because the value of zero depends on the context of the calculation, it can never be made equal to "infinity", which is a value that can not be calculated.    

 

 

bredlau-rhyan
Active Member
Rhyanna B Member Since: Jan 24, 2017
58 of 121

 

It would be as if the very fabric of the Universe is in reality a grid. You can only go from one point of the grid to another point and there are no intermediary positions at all. The distance between two of those points is called the Planck length, which would be the minimal length in the Universe. Nothing could be smaller because the whole concept of being smaller than the Planck length doesn't make any sense. The Planck length is extremely small. Like really extremely small.

 

And because time is nothing more than another axis in a four-dimensional Universe, the same rule applies. There is a minimal non-divisible duration, the Planck time. Nothing happens between two Planck time graduations.


 Is this the same Planck from which the Planck Epoch gets its name?

bredlau-rhyan
Active Member
Rhyanna B Member Since: Jan 24, 2017
59 of 121

Whereas I use it as a subtle nod to the television show...although, to be fair, that shouldn't be a mark of authority, really.

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
60 of 121

@Jennifer D wrote:

I think it must have been Kat C (although I don't remember to be sure, and I apologise if I'm incorrect) who introduced me here in the forum to the History of English podcast by Kevin Stroud. I've been listening to it non-stop on my commute ever since. It's really fascinating to see how English has developed and gleefully stolen from Old Norse, Norman French, and Latin to create itself.


I LOVE that podcast!!!

 

I have to pick it up and listen again. The wheels fell off my bus when the work storm hit me. I had the whole family listening to it...

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