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Greasing the writing wheels...

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
1 of 6

Do the brother and sister writers do a writing warm up before diving into stringing those words into coherent sentences?

 

I find I operate in one of two ways:

 

1. The overwhelming urge to write down the introductory sentence (which means I'm waiting around for my subconscious to say, "HEY! HERE IT IS! WRITE THIS SENTENCE DOWN!);

2. I warm up by reading something and then writing my thoughts down about it in a journal.

 

For me, it's always that treacherous first sentence which unlocks the rest of the flow. After that, the Kraken is unleashed!

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
2 of 6

Sometimes I have great ideas. Like a dialogue unfolds in my head. I never carry paper on me so I can't write down ideas when they pop up. So eventually everything fades away in my head.

 

That's it. Life sucks.

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
3 of 6

@Rene K wrote:

Sometimes I have great ideas. Like a dialogue unfolds in my head. I never carry paper on me so I can't write down ideas when they pop up. So eventually everything fades away in my head.

 

That's it. Life sucks.


 Even if you do write the great ideas down when they pop into your head, they don't always look the same on paper (or on the screen) as they do in your head.

 

I sometimes think up titles and get totally inspired by them, but inspiration (and motivation) fades - in my case.

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
4 of 6

@Nichola L wrote:

@Rene K wrote:

Sometimes I have great ideas. Like a dialogue unfolds in my head. I never carry paper on me so I can't write down ideas when they pop up. So eventually everything fades away in my head.

 

That's it. Life sucks.


 Even if you do write the great ideas down when they pop into your head, they don't always look the same on paper (or on the screen) as they do in your head.

 

I sometimes think up titles and get totally inspired them, but inspiration (and motivation) fades - in my case.


 That's been my lifelong challenge with writing.

 

I have the idea. I write it down. Wait. That's not what I wanted LOL.

reinierb
Community Guru
Reinier B Member Since: Nov 3, 2015
5 of 6

@Kat C wrote:

@Nichola L wrote:

@Rene K wrote:

Sometimes I have great ideas. Like a dialogue unfolds in my head. I never carry paper on me so I can't write down ideas when they pop up. So eventually everything fades away in my head.

 

That's it. Life sucks.


 Even if you do write the great ideas down when they pop into your head, they don't always look the same on paper (or on the screen) as they do in your head.

 

I sometimes think up titles and get totally inspired them, but inspiration (and motivation) fades - in my case.


 That's been my lifelong challenge with writing.

 

I have the idea. I write it down. Wait. That's not what I wanted LOL.


 Sometimes I devise a question instead of a title or a first sentence. Since I have the general outline of the piece in my head already, I ask the question is such a way that if it were answered, the answer would look like what I have in my head. Sometimes the question I started with works as a title too, albeit with some modification.

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
6 of 6


 That's been my lifelong challenge with writing.

 

I have the idea. I write it down. Wait. That's not what I wanted LOL.


 Sometimes I devise a question instead of a title or a first sentence. Since I have the general outline of the piece in my head already, I ask the question is such a way that if it were answered, the answer would look like what I have in my head. Sometimes the question I started with works as a title too, albeit with some modification.


 Heisenberg!

 

That's exactly my process for clients. I start with a question the client is attempting to answer (actually, it's always more than one). Such is how I format all of my outlines -- I'm not a "pantser."

 

It's that first sentence of the very first paragraph which sets the rest in motion. 

 

Sometimes it's a statistic.

 

Other times, it's a bold statement about something commonly known in the industry. 

 

Or, if I'm feeling contrarian, it's a "contrary to popular belief" sentence (though I don't use that specifically as an intro).