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Hello Writer's

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Ace Contributor
Emmanuel S Member Since: Mar 17, 2016
1 of 27

I want to know which Plagiarism tool is the best. I've been making use of the Duplichecker tool and Smallseotools.

But something  confuses me about these two. Sometimes I check plagiarism with Duplichecker, it will detect no Plagiarism, but if I decide to recheck the article with Smallseotools, it will detect the article as plagiarized. Same thing applies to when I make use of Smallseotools, and later crosscheck with Duplichecker.

 

But this does not happen all the time. Just some times.

 

So, please, which Plagiarism tool is really the accurate?

 

Thanks.

2 of 27

@Emmanuel S wrote:

I want to know which Plagiarism tool is the best. I've been making use of the Duplichecker tool and Smallseotools.

But something  confuses me about these two. Sometimes I check plagiarism with Duplichecker, it will detect no Plagiarism, but if I decide to recheck the article with Smallseotools, it will detect the article as plagiarized. Same thing applies to when I make use of Smallseotools, and later crosscheck with Duplichecker.

 

But this does not happen all the time. Just some times.

 

So, please, which Plagiarism tool is really the accurate?

 

Thanks.


Why do you need a plagiarism tool as a writer if your content is 100% original? 

Ace Contributor
Emmanuel S Member Since: Mar 17, 2016
3 of 27

Hello Margaret,

 

Thanks for the reply.

I am working with a client, and he requires me to edit some articles from his website he delivers to me. He always wants them to be somehow similar. After editing it, I will need to run it through a plagiarism tool, to make sure it's 100% different, but says the same thing.

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4 of 27

@Emmanuel S wrote:

Hello Margaret,

 

Thanks for the reply.

I am working with a client, and he requires me to edit some articles from his website he delivers to me. He always wants them to be somehow similar. After editing it, I will need to run it through a plagiarism tool, to make sure it's 100% different, but says the same thing.


I see, Emmanuel, here is another one:

https://www.grammarly.com/plagiarism-checker 

Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
5 of 27

I write research based articles. Some of the articles include quotes and citations. For other articles, I am learning about the topic and then writing about it. I always use a plagiarism checker to make sure that I am not accidentally including excessive amounts of someone else's language in my articles. The only way a written article could be 100% original would be for me to create my own language using my own symbols. Woman Wink

 

To the OP: I would ask the client which program he prefers. I use Grammarly usually because it integrates with MSWord. Sometimes I use Copyscape. 

Ace Contributor
Emmanuel S Member Since: Mar 17, 2016
6 of 27

@Tonya P wrote:

I write research based articles. Some of the articles include quotes and citations. For other articles, I am learning about the topic and then writing about it. I always use a plagiarism checker to make sure that I am not accidentally including excessive amounts of someone else's language in my articles. The only way a written article could be 100% original would be for me to create my own language using my own symbols. Woman Wink

 

To the OP: I would ask the client which program he prefers. I use Grammarly usually because it integrates with MSWord. Sometimes I use Copyscape. 



Grammarly is quite good, I think I will use it. And as you said, the article included quotes, like from Martin Luther King Jr, but I told him I won't be adding those quotes. But he insisted, so I put it. The quotes normally appears as plagiarized, because they are all over the web.

 

But, what do you mean by using your own words for the quotes? Do you mean by rewriting it, and changing the original words used in it? 

Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
7 of 27

There are a few different ways that you can refer to someone else's work. These are the ones that I come across the most: 

 

Direct quote- I would not leave out the quotes when referencing a famous speaker. If you have included the citations, i.e. "In the words of Martin Luther King, Jr....", then I wouldn't count that as plagiarism. The program won't distinguish between proper citation or copied- it will just flag the words as duplicates.

 

Paraphrased reference- If you choose to rephrase someone else's words, you may still need to offer a citation. For instance, I might say "In a recent Wall Street Journal article..." I could put what the article said into my own words, but would still need to cite my source.

 

Distillation of information- If I write,  "Vinyl car wraps are an affordable and effective way to advertise your business," I am basing that statement on something I've read. In an academic setting, I would need to cite my reference. In a blog article, I would not cite a reference for the statement, but I would make sure that I wrote it in such a way that it wasn't a direct copy of someone else's work. If a plagiarism check turned up the exact same phrasing elsewhere, I would change my statement to be more unique. 

 

I run into duplicate word issues more when I am writing about technical or medical issues. Some words and phrases are fact-based and are going to be the same no matter who writes about the topic. 

Community Leader
Peter G Member Since: Aug 1, 2015
8 of 27

"He always wants them to be somehow similar. After editing it, I will need to run it through a plagiarism tool, to make sure it's 100% different, but says the same thing."

 

In my experience, it's likely this client doesn't own the rights to these articles.  That's why he wants them "edited" to make sure they're "100% different" and then checked for plagiarism. He wants to be sure he can get away with plagiarism.  I can think of no other reason why someone would want "100% different" versions of an article.

 
Ace Contributor
Emmanuel S Member Since: Mar 17, 2016
9 of 27

@Peter G wrote:

"He always wants them to be somehow similar. After editing it, I will need to run it through a plagiarism tool, to make sure it's 100% different, but says the same thing."

 

In my experience, it's likely this client doesn't own the rights to these articles.  That's why he wants them "edited" to make sure they're "100% different" and then checked for plagiarism. He wants to be sure he can get away with plagiarism.  I can think of no other reason why someone would want "100% different" versions of an article.

 

I am not really sure of that, but according to him, he owns the right to the articles. He said it's from his site, I wanted to know about the site, but it's of no use.

 

I just edit and send to him. That's his business. But, I think, maybe the articles belonged to him, but appeared elsewhere on the web, so he wants to make an edit to keep it unique.

Ace Contributor
Jake S Member Since: Mar 29, 2016
10 of 27

When he sends you an article, Google it.

 

Then email the article owner and ask if it's the same person (it's not, he's a fraud).

 

*edited*

 

Actually, what are the articles about? Maybe it's academic fraud. Either way, I'd ditch the client and report him.

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