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Help for New Writers

Community Leader
David D Member Since: Jun 8, 2016
11 of 24

That's a problem I find when you run into the sub-sub contracting gigs. 

 

By the time you get the details, it's second generation hearsay and things get diluted. Everyone remember playing a game of telephone?? 

 

I don't generally mind them but unless the two original parties are on their game, it can get very diluted and sloppy quickly! 

Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
12 of 24

@David D wrote:

That's a problem I find when you run into the sub-sub contracting gigs. 

 

By the time you get the details, it's second generation hearsay and things get diluted. Everyone remember playing a game of telephone?? 

 

I don't generally mind them but unless the two original parties are on their game, it can get very diluted and sloppy quickly! 


Though they are out there somewhere, these mysterious client and end client in-sync experiences, I've yet to come across this miraculous combo.

 

I wish I could say differently.

 

However, I'm now less likely to work with a "middle person" than ever before. 

 

But, I'm in no way discouraging new writers from giving it a whirl. 

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
13 of 24

@David D wrote:

That's a problem I find when you run into the sub-sub contracting gigs. 

 

By the time you get the details, it's second generation hearsay and things get diluted. Everyone remember playing a game of telephone?? 

 

I don't generally mind them but unless the two original parties are on their game, it can get very diluted and sloppy quickly! 


 This is especially a problem if you're in a niche that involves specialized knowledge. Kat and the ultimate client know things about the effective creation of test items that the person passing messages between them does not. I run into the same problem with general agencies seeking legal content--they often simply don't understand the question I've asked, and if they attempt to paraphrase, the meaning is changed completely.

 

 

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
14 of 24

@Kat C wrote:
....He's the middle man....

 *shudder*

Community Leader
David D Member Since: Jun 8, 2016
15 of 24

I have another one to add to the list of things to watch out for. 

 

Be wary of any listing that looks like this:

 

"Hey, I have a quick 1,000-word writing job if anyone is looking for some 5-star feedback!"

 

Translation: These clients are essentially trying to trade good feedback for cheap writing. They're hoping that new writers will think they need to knock out some projects for cheap in order to establish themselves.

 

Don't fall for it. 1,000 words, no matter what, is not a "quick job." Even if you know the subject like the back of your hands. Even if you know you can knock that out in an hour, it's still a job that is worth a good amount of $. 

 

Don't sell yourself short. 

Community Leader
Jerry J Member Since: Jul 25, 2016
16 of 24

Great guide David! Thank you! 

However, I find it almost impossible to find clients who are willing to pay 3 cents a word, let alone 5 cents that you recommend. Any well-paying jobs (scarce) are directed at the US/UK regions, so I have to work at 2 cents a word if I want to pay my bills at the end of the month. 

 

All my clients have two standard arguments when I ask for higher rates - 

1. You're from India; I can hire American writers at that rate. They automatically assume that I am sub-par when compared to an American writer. 

2. There are plenty of freelancers willing to write a 1000 word article for $5. Another pain in the a** for freelance writers.

 

I'd like to know your opinion regarding these pricing issues. 

Community Guru
Kathryn B Member Since: Jul 22, 2015
17 of 24

1. If a client says that, they do not deserve your service.  Simple as that.

 

2. Good clients do exist.  If they say "plenty of freelancers are willing to work for x amount" then they can go find those freelancers.

~I am only here when I can tolerate having my eyes blasted, my privacy treated like a joke, and my temper pushed to it's limit. For all other times, please request alternate contact methods~
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
18 of 24

@Kathryn B wrote:

 

 If they say "plenty of freelancers are willing to work for x amount" then they can go find those freelancers.


 And then, later, they can come and hire one of us to fix what $5/1000 words bought them.

Community Guru
Kathryn B Member Since: Jul 22, 2015
19 of 24

@Tiffany S wrote:

@Kathryn B wrote:

 

 If they say "plenty of freelancers are willing to work for x amount" then they can go find those freelancers.


 And then, later, they can come and hire one of us to fix what $5/1000 words bought them.


 Precisely.  And generally, those job posts are written as "need a professional writer to rewrite" but still offer a low rate.  I've simply stopped looking at anything with a budget under $150 (well, stopped looking entirely, but that's my lowest budget search in my side list when I log in Smiley Tongue ).

~I am only here when I can tolerate having my eyes blasted, my privacy treated like a joke, and my temper pushed to it's limit. For all other times, please request alternate contact methods~
Community Leader
Jerry J Member Since: Jul 25, 2016
20 of 24

Yeah, that's true ;-)
I wish I could avoid wasting connects on clients who are searching for cheap and sub standard work. What are some red flags you see on jobs that make you go: Yeah...pass?

 

I'm on the lookout for people saying 'great 5* feedback' and ones who say they want 10x600 words while instructing freelancers to bid at or below the $20 mark -_-


Also, I've filtered out job postings that are marked as 'Entry Level.' It seems to be a code word for: I want you to complete a massive amount of work for pennies.

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