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Hourly contract

Active Member
Wilson D Member Since: Jul 23, 2019
1 of 13

The client's payment method was verified and I don't the reason why upwork gave a refund

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
2 of 13

re: "The client's payment method was verified and I don't the reason why upwork gave a refund"


The refund happened because your hours were not protected by the Upwork Payment Protection program.

 

To qualify, you need more than a payment-verified contract. Also need time logged by the destkop app (not manual time), adequate/informative memos, adequate activity levels, and screenshots showing you working on the project (not watching YouTube/Facebook, etc.)

Community Guru
Abinadab A Member Since: Sep 26, 2016
3 of 13

Preston H wrote:

(not watching YouTube/Facebook, etc.)


What if the job actually involved being on fb?

What if the freelancer was actually doing the job by being on fb or watching Youtube?

 

Call it an academic question, if you may.

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
4 of 13

re: "What if the job actually involved being on fb? What if the freelancer was actually doing the job by being on fb or watching Youtube?"

 

!!

Well if that's the job, then obviously that would count, and that wouldn't be something that would disqualify work diary screenshots from Upwork Payment Protection.

 

I was just trying to give an example.

Forget about what I said and use this example instead:

If the job is "Edit the punctuation and spelling in this Word file and never play Tetris while doing so," then a client would not want to see screenshots of a freelancer playing Tetris.

Community Guru
Abinadab A Member Since: Sep 26, 2016
5 of 13

Thanks for your response, Preston.

In general, I think that, as fb and the social networks increasingly become part and parcel of people's lives, it might become even tougher for the Upwork hourly protection team to arbitrate on disputes where the time tracker captured a few times that the freelancer was on fb, or Youtube, or playing tetris.

 

Upwork might not be able to say for sure that the freelancer was not looking for a solution to a problem related to the client's project, on fb. The freelancer might not want the client to know how he goes about finding his solutions. This is just a hypothetical scenario.

Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
6 of 13

Abinadab A wrote:

Thanks for your response, Preston.

In general, I think that, as fb and the social networks increasingly become part and parcel of people's lives, it might become even tougher for the Upwork hourly protection team to arbitrate on disputes where the time tracker captured a few times that the freelancer was on fb, or Youtube, or playing tetris.

 

Upwork might not be able to say for sure that the freelancer was not looking for a solution to a problem related to the client's project, on fb. The freelancer might not want the client to know how he goes about finding his solutions. This is just a hypothetical scenario.


In those hypothetical scenarios, the freelancer whose client failed to pay would remain unpaid. Not Upwork's problem. Payment Protection is a benefit subject to specific criteria, failure to meet the criteria means you don't receive the benefit. 

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
7 of 13

lol "Jane" went poof.

 

The Internet is not sending its best.

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
8 of 13

Abinadab A wrote:

Thanks for your response, Preston.

In general, I think that, as fb and the social networks increasingly become part and parcel of people's lives, it might become even tougher for the Upwork hourly protection team to arbitrate on disputes where the time tracker captured a few times that the freelancer was on fb, or Youtube, or playing tetris.

 

Upwork might not be able to say for sure that the freelancer was not looking for a solution to a problem related to the client's project, on fb. The freelancer might not want the client to know how he goes about finding his solutions. This is just a hypothetical scenario.


Tonya's reply gets to the heart of the matter: the rules are the rules, and you follow them for protection, or ignore them to forego protection. The screenshots conform to the rules, or they do not. There's no judgment involved on Upwork's part.

 

I only want to clarify, for the sake of anyone confused by your language, that Upwork never "arbitrate[s] on disputes." As escrow agent, it cannot do so. During "mediation"—something of a misnomer—it encourages the disputants to come to agreement. If no agreement is forthcoming, Upwork can only refer the parties out to a professional "arbitration" service for a legally binding resolution.

Community Guru
Abinadab A Member Since: Sep 26, 2016
9 of 13

Douglas Michael M wrote:

I only want to clarify, for the sake of anyone confused by your language, that Upwork never "arbitrate[s] on disputes." As escrow agent, it cannot do so. During "mediation"—something of a misnomer—it encourages the disputants to come to agreement. If no agreement is forthcoming, Upwork can only refer the parties out to a professional "arbitration" service for a legally binding resolution.


You're right. The Upwork team mediates in, and doesn't arbitrate on, disputes.

But I believe in the course of doing this to determine if a freelancer qualifies for hourly protection, they often have to make a decision or two.

If not, they would have appointed bots to do the job.

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
10 of 13

Abinadab A wrote:

Douglas Michael M wrote:

I only want to clarify, for the sake of anyone confused by your language, that Upwork never "arbitrate[s] on disputes." As escrow agent, it cannot do so. During "mediation"—something of a misnomer—it encourages the disputants to come to agreement. If no agreement is forthcoming, Upwork can only refer the parties out to a professional "arbitration" service for a legally binding resolution.


You're right. The Upwork team mediates in, and doesn't arbitrate on, disputes.

But I believe in the course of doing this to determine if a freelancer qualifies for hourly protection, they often have to make a decision or two.

If not, they would have appointed bots to do the job.


Given Upwork's base M.O., I wouldn't be surprised if they have. Robot wink

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