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How Many Rewrites Are Too Many?

Active Member
Holly G Member Since: Jan 21, 2017
1 of 10

Generally, I provide small edits and changes to any work that I turn in to clients, for no added costs. After all, I want them to be pleased and continue using my services, so if they want some links, an added paragraph, a new intro, whatever, I'll do it. I think that's just a part of building a good business relationship.

 

However, if a client suddenly starts asking for large amounts of free rewrites (basically entire pieces), because they've decided they want to go with a different style than was originally requested upon hiring, should I do it, or politely request additional fees, and risk (a) no more work from said client and (b) a poor rating?

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
2 of 10

@Holly G wrote:
How Many Rewrites Are Too Many?

 One more than the exact number of rewrites you specifically agreed upon with the client before taking on the contract.

 

If you haven't done this, it's a serious oversight and one you would be wise to avoid for any and all future contracts unless they are hourly contracts, because with an hourly contract the client can have it re-written as many times as their hearts desire, as they are paying the hourly rate for the rewrites.

Community Guru
Christy A Member Since: Dec 30, 2015
3 of 10

I would politely explain to the client that the work is now out of scope and a new agreement needs to be made for the additional requests. If the contract goes south because of this, I would use your Top Rated perk to remove any negative feedback.

Active Member
Holly G Member Since: Jan 21, 2017
4 of 10

I rarely do hourly jobs, so, in the case of a set-amount job, wouldn't that mean that, if it's not discussed, no rewrites are agreed upon/required? (Speaking hypothetically) 

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
5 of 10

@Holly G wrote:

I rarely do hourly jobs, so, in the case of a set-amount job, wouldn't that mean that, if it's not discussed, no rewrites are agreed upon/required? (Speaking hypothetically) 


 No. From a client's perspective, a fixed price job means that's how much it will cost to get the end product they are purchasing, no matter what it takes to get there.

 

If you were selling cakes and you forgot to put sugar in the first cake and it was inedible, you wouldn't expect for your client to pay you to fix it, would you?

 

Of course, there is a big difference between that scenario and your customer coming in to pick up his blue-frosted cake and saying, "Oh, I've decided I want it yellow. Could your re-do it?" There's an upcharge for that. Changing the scope or paramaters of the project is different from asking for a legitimate revision. But, if you don't specify a number of revisions that are included in the price, the typical client will assume the price is for all work up to the point that you fulfill the original contract to his satisfaction.

Community Guru
Gerry S Member Since: Nov 23, 2014
6 of 10

Go to arbitration.

 

People know when they're out of line; but you have to call them out to change their behaviour.

 

I decide at what point an "interested client" becomes a freeloader; during the "interview" process; not afterwards.

 

You need to be more speciofic about "number of words"; pages; whatever makes sense as a "measure" (?) in your field.

 

My "measure" is "functions" / functionality.

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
7 of 10

It's funny about arbitration. Both my client and I got beat up. Me for not specifying that I don't do endless revisions. Learned that the hard way. Him for wasting time with simple edits that he could have just done himself.

 

Most clients that don't have the time to mess around won't even take me up on my revision offer. They just make changes and move on. Takes a lot less time than sending me comments, waiting for me to have bandwidth, and then I send them back. Basically, a few minutes versus a few days. These people are your common sense average joe worker guy.


Then you get people who want their pound of flesh and take advantage. The higher my rate goes, the less I run into these people. Seems counterintuitive, but the people with money seem to not want to fart around with nonsense and the ones with no money are the ones that want to send something back to you for a one word change, which has happened to me.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
8 of 10

@Gerry S wrote:

Go to arbitration.


 You do know that costs $ 291, non-refundable, win or lose?

Community Guru
Kathy T Member Since: Jul 17, 2015
9 of 10

Just one REWRITE is too many since that is a whole different job from the scope of work originally agreed on.

 

As for edits, that should be specified on the contract.

Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
10 of 10

I specify upfront regarding revisions/rewrites (though no one has ever asked for a rewrite--and very few ask for edits; indeed one client said his compliance team always kicks back the piece...so far, that hasn't happened). 

 

If they want changes as we move along and possibly even after I notify them the writing is done, then I tell them to set up an hourly contract.

 

If they just want me to write and send (I always copy-edit BEFORE I send it to them, and I also notify them of this), then fixed rate is fine. No edits after I send. 

 

So far, they've chosen hourly. 

 

I learned my lesson the hard way with my very first contract on Upwork Smiley Mad

 

 

 

 

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