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I am not getting any new job on Upwork

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Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
21 of 23

Wendy W wrote:

Petra R wrote:

Melanie M wrote:

How are your translation skills? Perhaps you can translate into your native language. I'm not a translator, though, so I am not knowledgeable on that subject.  


Why oh why do people assume that someone who more or less speaks more than one language can go forth and translate?

Would you suggest that the owner of a scalpel should go ahead and perform surgery?


It's hardly the same. That's like saying if you're not a trained chef you shouldn't try to make yourself dinner. People make that assumption because in English outside of legal settings we use the words "translate" and "interpret" interchangably, but many languages don't have a distinction.

 

If I have instructions in a language I can't read, I hardly care if someone translates or interprets, or does so into perfect English as long the actions are accurate.


Wendy,I am sure you are aware that Petra and I are professional translators with a long history. The point is that don't even have to be a trained chef to work in a restaurant. But you should not be preparing Fugu.

 

As to the meaning of "translate" and "interprete": They are clearly defind and I have not seen a language that does not make a difference. It is a general problem (like for most people "software developers" and "programers" are doing the same work):

to translate: transform written language from language A into language B

to interpret: translform spoken language from language A into language B

 

In this case it is the intransitiv verb. You are refering to the meaning of the transitiv verb which in the linguistics is referred to as "to localize".

 

Also, since you came with the example of instructions: A user manual is part of a certified product and a poor manual will prefent a product from being sold. A product can be certified for a region and has then the manual translated (very common in the EU). If the translation is poor=wrong and something goes wrong, the company producing and the shops selling it face serious trouble. Just because someone thought it is enough to run a text through google translate and then fix a few obvious mistakes.

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Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
22 of 23

Wendy W wrote:


> in English outside of legal settings we use the words "translate" and "interpret" interchangably

 

No, these words have a totally distinct meaning in English.

 

> If I have instructions in a language I can't read, I hardly care if someone translates or interprets, or does so into perfect English as long the actions are accurate.

 

That may work for your Chinese fridge manual.

 

 

 

 

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
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Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
23 of 23

Rene K wrote:

Wendy W wrote:


> in English outside of legal settings we use the words "translate" and "interpret" interchangably

 

No, these words have a totally distinct meaning in English.

 

> If I have instructions in a language I can't read, I hardly care if someone translates or interprets, or does so into perfect English as long the actions are accurate.

 

That may work for your Chinese fringe manual.

 

____________________

Unless the manual is correctly translated - it could be positively dangerous. 

 

That said, it seems in his profile that the OP is not offering translation (to English) as part of his skillset. I can see no reason why he should not write blogs in English even if it is not up to the exacting standards of some people whose native language is not English either. If the OP comes up with an interesting blog or a helpful blog in an English that is not perfect, I am not going to argue. 

 

The only time I would make suggestions for improvement, is if I were hired to do so. 


 

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