Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Inexperienced writer, how to gain experience

aditipie
Community Guru
Aditi J Member Since: Jul 28, 2015
11 of 19

Yes, my science background has helped me immensely to be discerning. For instance, If Stanford offers you $15 to do a survey, accept the job. If Kolabtree offers you $20 for a blog, accept the job. That's exactly what I did.

 

Not all low paying jobs are scope creeps or problem behaviors. Indeed, my science background has given me an open mind to accept gigs without stereotyping clients or having sweeping generalizations

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
12 of 19

@Aditi J wrote:

Yes, my science background has helped me immensely to be discerning. For instance, If Stanford offers you $15 to do a survey, accept the job. If Kolabtree offers you $20 for a blog, accept the job. That's exactly what I did.

 

Not all low paying jobs are scope creeps or problem behaviors. Indeed, my science background has given me an open mind to accept gigs without stereotyping clients or having sweeping generalizations


 There is a high propensity for those jobs to be precisely that...scope creep and haggling. 

 

It's neither stereotyping nor a sweeping generalization, which is oddly a sweeping generalization of my comment LOL. Never did I state all jobs. Indeed I used a very specific term when referring to those behaviors. 

 

If you're on the forums long enough, there are distinct and noticeable patterns of behavior with accepting low ball jobs. New Upworkers NEED to be aware of this, which is the exact point of my post.

 

So no, if Stanford offered me $15 to do a survey, no thanks. But, I'm in a different field of science from you, so perhaps that's why I have the leverage to say "no." That's a feasible argument. Also, "no" to accepting $20 to do a blog. But, neither am I prescribing a certain amount for others. Merely restating a consistent behavior given a particular population based on a lengthy presence on Upwork and in the forums. 

 

Your patterns of discernment, on a personal level, do not translate to the bell curve population. Perhaps you're great at navigating through the Upwork system and slowly or quickly building up to a higher rate. But, that, again on your end is a sweeping generalization of the population who consistently vents in the forums about low-ball clients. 

aditipie
Community Guru
Aditi J Member Since: Jul 28, 2015
13 of 19

I would not argue with any freelancer about leverage they have or they think they have in refusing a job. When you visit their profiles, it is self-evident whether or not they practice what they preach. 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
14 of 19

@Aditi J wrote:

Depending on their circumstances, a freelancer may need to accept low-paying jobs. I would not label it best or worst, it is just what they needed to do in that moment. Is that the best way to gain experience? Maybe. If you do not have any other financial income then, accepting low paying jobs will help you with some bills. But if you can wait for the right job with right pay then that would be the best case scenario. Figuring out what is right for you is the key.   

 

I wish you the best. 

 


 Of course every freelancer has to figure out what is best for him/her. But, wouldn't you agree that it's important to factor in things like the fact that freelancers who start out offering bargain-basement rates to "get started" often end up locked into those rates for a long time, since future prospective clients see that they work for pennies and assume their skills are low-quality?

aditipie
Community Guru
Aditi J Member Since: Jul 28, 2015
15 of 19

a. In my view, a low paying job is better than nothing at all but I'm not advocating working for less than minimum wages (BaskinRobbins (an ice-cream shop) hires at $11 might as well work there Smiley Wink ). Low paying job might help one with paying bills or invest that money and watch it grow for 2-3 months until you get the right job.     

 

b. Getting locked at a certain rate is possible. I had attended an Upwork seminar - "Earning more on Upwork" in which the speaker had a methodical approach regarding how to increase your rate for new and existing clients. I used his suggestion and it worked for me. But I agree that for some freelancers getting locked for a long time may have happened. To any newcomer, I'd highly encourage attending Upwork webinars. 

 

c. Searching for jobs on Upwork can be extremely time-consuming. It was very important for me to get into Rising Talent or Top Rated Status or Groups as soon as possible so that I minimize the time spent on looking for gigs. As long as it was not below minimum wages, I did not care for $$, just focused on getting JSS.

 

(In some states, $10 or $8 is minimum wages and hence, I find Louisa's approach reasonable.)   

 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
16 of 19

Aditi, I think we are talking about two very different things. Certainly, someone in need of money might prefer to be paid McDonald's wages over no wages at all. My point wasn't really about money, though. My concern is the often irrevocable harm done to a freelancer's reputation when she publicly shows that she values her (just for example) programming work at the same rate that an employer values a 16-year-old sweeping the floor of a retail establishment.

sonnerlotus1
Active Member
Tonya S Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
17 of 19

Aditi J where can I find the upwork webinars you speak of? I would love to attend. Ive nevr heard the mentioned before.

craiggabriel
Community Leader
Craig G Member Since: Jun 20, 2017
18 of 19

I find this a highly interesting and relevant discussion, given where I am in my Upwork career. I recently asked about this very thing in another category of the forums.

 

I can see either side of it. I understand how taking low-paying jobs might get one stuck at that level, and if the alternative was to take high-paying jobs instead, well that would be a no-brainer. But as a newbie, it feels like the alternative is to get no jobs.

 

I mean, let’s say I do 10 low-paying jobs just to have some kind of Upwork history and positive feedback to show on my profile. I see how there could be a risk that a high-paying client could look at my profile and think, “This guy works for pennies. He must not be good enough for higher paying projects like mine.” But if I instead had zero jobs in my profile, how would that be more impressive?

 

It just feels like when I go in search of a decent-paying job, I’d rather be able to tell an employer “I worked at McDonald’s for five years for slave wages, and I have references from my manager there stating that I was an excellent employee” than “I’ve never had a job,” not that I’d expect him or her to be particularly impressed by either.

 

So I’m not sure. Right now I’d say I lean toward the view that it’s better to be able to show a work history, even of crappy, low-paying gigs, than to wait to somehow land a decent-paying gig with no prior experience. But I’m persuadable either way.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
19 of 19

I remember my dad pointing to McDonald's workers and asking me if I wanted to be a flunkie. He would then tell me if I was a flunkie that's where I'd end up. Thank god for my dad. Cuz now I look at those passionate writers and I just think of my dad. "Do you want to be that? A flunkie? Think of all the cool things you can do and have if you're not a flunkie."  My dad is ace and pretty much the OG pimp of Miami.

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS