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Is the word rewriting the new plagiarism?

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
11 of 20

@David A wrote:
Yep.

Who is your target market?

 

Most of us are "creative" writers - myself included. 

 

So, what makes you different from the thousands (ok, more likely, tens of thousands) of other "creative writers" on this platform?

 

These aren't necessarily questions to answer in the forum.

 

 

reinierb
Community Guru
Reinier B Member Since: Nov 3, 2015
12 of 20

My first job on Elance entailed writing some automotive diagnostics related articles for a Lemon Law lawyer in New York, which was the easy part. The hard part was the 50 comments he wanted to go with each of the 15 articles that he could place as "true experiences" from "actual" complainants. The really difficult part was spinning each   comment seven ways on the word level so that he could construct hundreds of additional comments from each set of 50.

 

The job paid extremely well, and the client is still using those spun comments three years later, but never in my life will I undertake any spinning of anything ever again, even if I wrote the original. It sucks the life out of you, or at least, it did for me, so no matter how much the job pays, the money is not worth the effort even if the client owns the copyright.  

allergywriter
Community Guru
Cheryl K Member Since: Jul 16, 2015
13 of 20

Now for something different:

 

I have one client for which I "spin" articles that I have previously written for one of his sites.  I write an originial and post to one site and about 9 months later I spin it and put it on another of his sites.  I've been doing this for about 4 years now.  I give him a $5 discount on the second article and since it is a client that is not on Upwork, I'm not losing any of my money in fees.

 

The arrangement works and will probably continue to work.  If that's what he wants and is willing to pay for it; that's what he gets. 

 

Don't know I would do it for a new client here on Upwork.

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
14 of 20

@Cheryl K wrote:

 

I have one client for which I "spin" articles that I have previously written for one of his sites. 


 Why don't they ask for entirely new content instead?

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
allergywriter
Community Guru
Cheryl K Member Since: Jul 16, 2015
15 of 20

I don't know why he doesn't ask for new material.  I ididn't question him.

 

Years back he just asked if I would do this and I said "yeah"

seawitch
Active Member
Cynthia W Member Since: Apr 29, 2017
16 of 20

I think these folks don't ask for newly written stuff because A) they think it will be cheaper to get rewrites than originals and B) they think the previously written material was very good so why take a chance on something new.

 

I ran into this issue (this thread) this morning. I'm new to Upwork, bid on a job, and after messaging it became clear that the person wanted me to rewrite some articles so they would not *appear* to be plagiarized. I said I wasn't comfortable with that kind of word. It smells bad to me, and I can't think of any good reason for doing it.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
17 of 20

I think it happens for a few reasons.

 

The client may not know a lot about the subject matter and feel safer relying on a trusted source's existing article--especially when hiring a low-end, low-cost freelancer who they may not want to entrust research to. 

 

Sometimes, though, the appropriate content just is what it is. Many years ago, in the more heavy-handed days of SEO (and before today's sophisticated local search), I had a team of contract writers creating legal information pages for each of hundreds of cities. Creativity wasn't called for: there was an effective, conversion-oriented page format and a several pieces of specific information that needed to be conveyed on each page. 

 

It's not a strategy I'd employ today, but I see job postings here and elsewhere that there are still a fair number of "SEO experts" engaging in that practice.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
18 of 20

@Rene K wrote:

@Cheryl K wrote:

 

I have one client for which I "spin" articles that I have previously written for one of his sites. 


 Why don't they ask for entirely new content instead?


 I have a client who does this (though contemporaneously) with everything I write for him. The reason he doesn't request entirely separate pieces is that he is an attorney and looking to convey specific information--the key information is going to be the same, and there's typically a most logical sequence in which to present it (or, at least, pieces of it).

allergywriter
Community Guru
Cheryl K Member Since: Jul 16, 2015
19 of 20

Tiffany

I suspect my client is running a retail direct site (he is a manufacturer of CNC tools) and he takes what is done for his mfg site and uses the rewritten stuff for the site where he sells stuff direct.

Once I am paid, I really don't care if he prints it and uses it for toilet paper. I did my job and gots my dollars!

jerryjames91
Community Leader
Jerry J Member Since: Jul 25, 2016
20 of 20

I think it's just another way of saying 'I don't know much about the subject at hand, but this is the best research material I could dig up from a Google search.' Of course, there are some who think that using the word 'rewrite' in a job posting grants them a license to offer slave wages.

 

I usually avoid rewriting gigs unless either the subject or pay seems interesting Smiley Wink 

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