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Query for a proposal

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Active Member
Ankish J Member Since: Jun 6, 2020
1 of 10

I recently received a proposal from a client. My bid for the project was $60, however, the client has only deposited $30 in the escrow account and wants me to submit the complete work. I have accepted the proposal but what about the remaining $30? He says it's a review draft. Please help!

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Moderator
Joanne Marie P Moderator Member Since: Nov 26, 2017
2 of 10

Hi Ankish,

 

For fixed-price contracts, clients can divide the project and fund each milestone. I checked, and it looks like your client is requesting that you submit the first draft so that they can review it. You may submit your work by clicking on the Submit Work for Payment button. The client has 14 days from the most recent submission on a milestone to review and approve or request changes. If the client approves, the payment from escrow will be released to you. For more information, please check out this article. Thanks!


-Joanne
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Ankish J Member Since: Jun 6, 2020
3 of 10
I understand what you said in the previous post but this milestone will already include the complete work. What will happen if he doesn’t respond or doesn’t add the other milestone and fund it? Will I be paid only $30?
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Community Leader
Sarah B Member Since: Dec 15, 2017
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4 of 10

Technically, the client can change his mind and decide he wants a first draft for $30 and if he likes it, he will pay you another $30. Of course, he can also say he doesn't and not pay you the second $30. So, yes, this way, you risk not being paid $30. You don't have to agree to this. You can walk away or tell the client you'll deliver a final draft for a milestone of $60.

 

It's up to you, but I think you can stick to your guns here. I've never had a problem personally, but you hear horror stories on the forum. The thing is, the system is set up so the client has 14 days to review your work before funds are released. So his insistence on reviewing a completed draft under a $30 milestone would send up red flags that he has no intention of paying $60 for a deliverable, or at least wants a way out of it, with or without getting further revisions out of you.

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Ankish J Member Since: Jun 6, 2020
5 of 10
Thanks Sarah for addressing my issue. I have sent him the draft on a Google doc with only viewing rights. Once he releases the full payment, I will give him the editing rights. I’ll hope for the best.
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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
6 of 10

Ankish J wrote:
Thanks Sarah for addressing my issue. I have sent him the draft on a Google doc with only viewing rights. Once he releases the full payment, I will give him the editing rights. I’ll hope for the best.

lol no.

 

Never click accept unless full escrow is funded. It's $60 not $60,000.

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Ankish J Member Since: Jun 6, 2020
7 of 10

Hey Jennifer,

 

I appreciate your reply, but every dollar's worth is different for every person. Plus, it's no crime to expect full payment for one's services. But yes, I'll be more careful next time.

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Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
8 of 10

Always provide the complete, usable file. Never a restricted or hamstrung file.

 

Never start work unless a milestone is fully funded.

 

Never expect to get paid more than is funded in escrow.

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Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
9 of 10

Ankish J wrote:

Hey Jennifer,

 

I appreciate your reply, but every dollar's worth is different for every person. Plus, it's no crime to expect full payment for one's services. But yes, I'll be more careful next time.


Jennifer meant that the client could have funded the full $60. So he might try to get the full work but only pay half.

If you agreed on an article for $60, the client does not own the work until he paid the full amount for it. So if he walks away without paying the agreed $60 and uses your article, you can file a DMCA. Just make sure you provid him with the finished article and not just a draft.

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Active Member
Ankish J Member Since: Jun 6, 2020
10 of 10
Thanks everyone for the help. You guys have been really helpful.

The client fulfilled his commitment and paid the full amount. Also, I’ll keep in mind all the tips you guys gave me, it will be really helpful in future.

Thanks once again!
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